Maggie Steber’s Documentary Work Paves the Way for Future Photojournalists

Photographers Tasneem Alsultan and Maggie Steber share their work in our annual photo issue.

For our annual photo issue we reached out to 16 up-and-coming photographers and asked them which photographer inspired them to pursue the medium. Then we approached their "idols" to see if they would be willing to publish work in the issue as well. What was provided, we think, creates a unique conversation about the line of influence between young artists and those more established in their careers. This post features work by Tasneem Alsultan and her chosen idol, Maggie Steber.

How Maggie Steber Turned a Brutal Portfolio Review into Career Success | PDNPulse

During our interview with photojournalist Maggie Steber, she observed that the photography business is now so challenging that you have to be a “never-say-die person” to succeed. But it was no easier for Steber when she was starting out than it is for any

During our interview with photojournalist Maggie Steber, she observed that the photography business is now so challenging that you have to be a “never-say-die person” to succeed. But it was no easier for Steber when she was starting out than it is for any fledgling photographer. She explains in this excerpt from the interview how she learned to persevere through failure, and prepare for her big break.

Why We Make Photographs

Maggie Steber on fighting for ideas, photographing oneself, the quiet heroism photo editors, and that “University of Missouri look”

Maggie Steber on fighting ones corner, turning the camera on yourself, the quiet heroism of photo editors, and that “University of Missouri look”

Spotlight On Maggie Steber

Eating dark chocolate in the middle of the night is a hidden secret pleasure. No one needs to know about it. In that way, it is mine alone. It's like a secret garden, where I can retreat and work on something and it doesn't matter whether I ever show the work and if anyone likes it or not. It's where the dark side of my personality can come out to play and thrive. It's like a guilty pleasure. I've thought about this a lot.... maybe this is where one's work reveals a longing to be free of one's self. I think we are described, for the most part, by how people regard us personally and professionally. In this secret garden where I might "eat dark chocolate in the middle of the night" I get to define myself and my work. I think this is a healthy and critical thing for anyone engaged in the creative process.

Women on the Front Lines and Behind the Lens

While you can’t necessarily identify if an image was captured by a woman or a man, women still tend to be underrepresented in the photography world — and tend to face unique challenges.

“Women of Vision: National Geographic Photographers on Assignment,” an exhibition opening Thursday and on view through March 9, 2014. It features 10 other photographers — Lynsey Addario, Kitra Cahana, Jodi Cobb, Diane Cook, Carolyn Drake, Lynn Johnson, Beverly Joubert, Erika Larsen, Maggie Steber and Amy Toensing — who have been published by the magazine in the past decade.

Maggie Steber: Seeing Past the Veil, Part 2

Here, is the second and final installment on her amazing career, including her thoughtful views on her personal goals and achievements and her observations on the role and relevance of photography in today’s rapidly changing world of digital imaging

Maggie Steber: Seeing Past the Veil, Part 1

When I applied for my first job at a small Texas daily paper, the managing editor told me the position would go to a male applicant. I talked him into giving me 24 hours to prove myself. I went out, found a story, photographed it, interviewed people, wrote the story, printed the pictures and returned to his office 24 hours later with a story of importance in the small town, ready for publication. He hired me on the spot. I never say die!

Maggie Steber responds to critics of @MediaStorm 's new pay to view model — duckrabbit

MediaStorm are charging $1.99 for people to access their latest films. One of them features the work of Maggie Steber....

I don’t think $1.99 is too much to ask because of the subjects…these are stories, and we should not think of them only as photography. If you do, you are mistaken and shortsighted. These are universal stories about life and the end of life and about how we as loved ones can be braver and more involved with those aspects of life. If those stories and what you can learn from them isn’t worth $1.99 than we are doomed as story tellers. We have to quit thinking that it’s only about photography. It’s far beyond that.

Quietly Finding Haiti's Audacious Beauty

During scores of trips to Haiti, Maggie Steber decided she had to find the country’s quiet moments. A new Web site showcases her 25-year search for beauty there.

To much of the outside world, the image of Haiti — when it pops up at all — is one of catastrophes, both natural and man-made. Violence, grinding poverty, flood, earthquakes all leave a lingering image of a benighted nation bereft of tender moments. Maggie Steber thinks that’s nonsense — and she has the pictures to prove it.

OUCH: Maggie Steber accuses duckrabbit of conducting a hysterical witchunt. Am I? — duckrabbit

There’s no question that Maggie Steber is a top, top photographer. She’s hugely respected for all the right reasons and...

There’s no question that Maggie Steber is a top, top photographer. She’s hugely respected for all the right reasons and her voice carries weight.  Tonight she’s written that duckrabbit’s (Benjamin Chesterton’s) questions regarding  Jodi Bieber’s World Press winning photograph are ‘hysterical’ and amount to a ‘witchunt’.  That’s quite a dressing down that deserves some thinking space.