A Photographer’s View from Inside a Brooklyn Junior High

Puppy love, cafeteria jousting, and other scenes from a public school in Bushwick in the eighties and early nineties.

Between 1981 and 1994, the photographer Meryl Meisler worked as an art teacher in Bushwick, Brooklyn, at Roland Hayes Intermediate School 291. In a new book, “New York: PARADISE LOST Bushwick Era Disco,” out in June, she collects photos that she took of her students and colleagues during those years—the Menudo fans, the puppy love, the cafeteria jousting, the sneaker style, and a bit of teacher trash-talking. “The students were on the pulse of popular culture, exuded youthful pride, and could challenge one’s wits,” she said recently. Meisler (who’d previously photographed the disco scene and her own family on Long Island) eventually moved to a school in Manhattan, where she continued to teach—and take pictures—until 2010. Her photography from three decades inside the city’s public schools is her largest unseen body of work. “I still get teacher nightmares,” she said.

Meryl Meisler: LES YES! Photographs of The Lower East Side During The 1970s & ‘80s

I've featured Meryl Meisler's wonderful photographs on Lenscratch numerous times and needless to say, I'm a fan. Her legacy as a New York City street photographer over the past 40 years ago reveals a grittier metropolis, nights of drugs and disco, and liv

I’ve featured Meryl Meisler‘s wonderful photographs on Lenscratch numerous times and needless to say, I’m a fan. Her legacy as a New York City street photographer over the past 40 years ago reveals a grittier metropolis, nights of drugs and disco, and lively neighborhoods filled with small dramas and  daily routines. In celebration of the Lower East Side History Month, Meryl has an exhibition at the The Storefront Project, running through this weekend, June 3, 2018. The exhibition, LES YES!, focuses on the Lower East Side during the 1970s & ‘80s, when as a 1978 CETA Artist grant recipient, Meryl created a portfolio of photographs documenting Jewish New York for the American Jewish Congress.
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New York : Meryl Meisler – The Eye of Photography

Steven Kasher Gallery has inaugurated last week its new solo exhibition devoted to Meryl Meisler’s earliest work. The exhibition includes over 35 black and white prints. The photographs capture the drama and exuberance of the 1970s, when pop-psychology encouraged everyone from suburban Long Island housewives to drag queens and disco queens to self-actualize and act out. The photographs drift between the kitsch-filled rooms of Meisler’s hometown in Long Island to the gritty clubs and streets of disco-era New York.

Seventies Long Island: The Whole Mishpocha

In the Jewish suburbia of Meryl Meisler’s youth, the bouffants are tall, the décor is loud, and everyone is a character or a ham.

before she began documenting urban life in New York, Meryl Meisler trained her eye outside of the city, photographing her own Jewish extended family on Long Island’s South Shore. In the early seventies, while home on winter break from studying illustration at the University of Wisconsin, Meisler began experimenting with deadpan self-portraiture, donning the Girl Scouts uniforms and the ballet and tap costumes of her childhood

Meryl Meisler: A Tale of Two Cities: Disco Era Bushwick

Photographer Meryl Meisler has a lot going on.  She recently published A Tale of Two Cities: Disco Era Bushwick to much acclaim and will soon be launching a new book, Purgatory & Paradise: Sassy ‘70s Suburbia & The City at the Bushwick Open Studios at The

Photographer Meryl Meisler has a lot going on.  She recently published A Tale of Two Cities: Disco Era Bushwick to much acclaim and will soon be launching a new book, Purgatory & Paradise: Sassy ‘70s Suburbia & The City at the Bushwick Open Studios at The Black Box Gallery in June 2015.  Today I feature work from A Tale of Two Cities, a project that highlights New York in the 1970′s and focuses on two cities existing in very different realities.