The Rohingya’s Desperate Journey Out of Myanmar

The photojournalist Moises Saman was in Bangladesh this past week documenting the conditions Rohingya refugees are enduring as they flee.

The Magnum photojournalist Moises Saman was in Bangladesh this past week documenting the conditions Rohingya are enduring as they flee, whether wading through the river that marks the border between the two countries, making desperate efforts to obtain food and shelter, or finding dignified ways to bury their dead

Powerful Photos of Five Years of Upheaval in the Middle East

We spoke to photographer Moises Saman about the work in his new book, 'Discordia'

Moises Saman: In Discordia, I felt the need to transcend the "news" aspect of the story, and instead work with the slightly more imprecise images that, in my opinion, offer a more nuanced narrative, one that was more in tune with my personal experience in the region

Photographer Moises Saman tells Newsweek about his journey documenting the Arab Spring

Magnum photographer Moises Saman has been chronicling the turmoil of the Arab Spring since 2011 for his new book, "Discordia"

"I was going from one assignment to another, from one revolution to the next, without really seeing the big picture," says Saman, who now lives in Barcelona, Spain with his fiancée. "I was working one week in Tunisia, the next week in Egypt, and two weeks later I was in Aleppo. I didn’t really have the luxury of much perspective—not that there was necessarily any to be had. The situations were so complex. I just felt the need to sort of slow down and take a look at what I had done."

Moises Saman’s Diary from the Middle East

The combat photographer Moises Saman’s new book captures the quiet moments peripheral to the action of a photojournalist.

in his new book, “Discordia,” which he is self-publishing this month, Saman collects images that convey a more personal and poetic account of his experience in the Middle East. The photographs often capture quiet moments peripheral to the action of a photojournalist: men collecting scrap metal from vehicles burned during the Rabaa massacre, in Cairo; the burial of a fallen fighter in Aleppo

Magnum Photos Blog

SamanMagnum photographer Moises Saman visited Iraqi Kurdistan, known as “Bashur”, or southern Kurdistan to Kurds, and to Kurdish-controlled parts of northern Syria, collectively known to Kurds as Rojava, or western Kurdistan, to document the latest phase of the Kurds’ battle against the Islamic State

Digging for Gold in the Andes

Moises Saman photographed unregulated gold mining in the ramshackle town of La Rinconada, in the Peruvian Andes.

The mines at La Rinconada, a bitter-cold, mercury-contaminated pueblo clinging to the glaciered mountainside, are “artisanal”—small, unregulated, and grossly unsafe. To stave off disaster, the miners propitiate the mountain deities with tiny liquor bottles. CREDITPHOTOGRAPH BY MOISES SAMAN / MAGNUM

Photojournalist Moises Saman Receives Guggenheim Fellowship

Saman plans to use the funds to continue his project about the Arab Spring

Awarded annually since 1925 “to further the development of scholars and artists by assisting them to engage in research in any field of knowledge and creation in any of the arts, under the freest possible conditions” the Guggenheim is one of the most prestigious awards of its kind.

Discordia: The Arab Spring

Since 2011, photographer Moises Saman has been documenting the upheaval in Egypt, Iraq, Lebanon, Libya, Syria, and Tunisia.

Since 2011, the photographer Moises Saman has been documenting the upheaval in Egypt, Iraq, Lebanon, Libya, Syria, and Tunisia. Though the photographs collectively capture the events of the past four years, his project “Discordia: The Arab Spring” is less literal, less linear. “From the start, I didn’t see ‘Discordia’ as a straightforward journalistic project but rather an exploration through imagery of my personal experience of the Arab Spring,”

Capturing Hong Kong

The ongoing protests in Hong Kong, says the photographer Moises Saman, are different from those that swept the cities of the Arab Spring.

The photographer Moises Saman spent the weekend documenting the protests in Hong Kong

LightBox | Time

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With temperatures reaching 100 degrees, the conditions on the Sinjar Mountains are dire. Most of the Yezidis ran for the hills without food and water. “That’s why it’s been such a dramatic situation for them,” says Moises Saman. “Without supplies on a mountain like that, nobody can survive more than a couple of days.”

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In late 2013, the medical humanitarian organizationDoctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) sent four photographers and videographers—Kate Brooks, Ton Koene, Moises Saman and Yuri Kozyrev—to outposts in Iraq, Lebanon and Jordan, where MSF provides help to Syrian refugees. The project, shot over a single day, chronicles the Syrian war’s reach beyond the country’s borders. Phil Zabriskie, Doctors Without Borders’ managing editor, speaks to TIME LightBox.

LightBox | Time

Read the latest stories about LightBox on Time

Another photographer, Adam Ferguson, and the New York Times’ Paris bureau chief Alissa J. Rubin were also on board and sustained minor injuries. “If we had been another 50 meters higher we’d all be dead,” Ferguson told the Times.

Magnum Photos Names Nominee, New Member, Appoints New Executive Director | PDNPulse

At the annual meeting of Magnum Photos last week, members of the photography collective voted to make Moises Saman, a long-time Magnum associate, a full member of the agency. Bieke Depoorter and Jerome Sessini were elevated from nominees to associate memb

members of the photography collective voted to make Moises Saman, a long-time Magnum associate, a full member of the agency

Moises Saman’s Return to Iraq

The photographer Moises Saman, who has covered the Arab Spring and the Syrian civil war for The New Yorker, has done extensive work in Iraq, but had not been back since 2010. He returned in March to take photographs to accompany my piece, and found what he called “a mood of pessimistic perseverance.”

Moises Saman's Stunning Photos See a Place Beyond Death

I asked him how to keep your humanity in a warzone.

Peruvian photographer, Moises Saman, has spent his recent years living in Cairo, documenting the Arab Spring's effect on the city's residents. Though he might argue "documenting" is the wrong word. His work wilfully avoids a chronological, ordered, historical view of the uprising – instead focusing on honesty and emotions. We spoke to him about how he maintains faith in humanity after working in warzones for years, and the irrelevance of "objectivity" in relation to his work.

Conflict Photographer's Best Pictures Are Some of Humanity's Worst Moments

Moises Saman is one of the leading conflict photographers of our time. In recent years, he has worked in Afghanistan, Egypt, Iraq, and Libya. In the August Issue of WIRED, Saman's photographs and interviews from Aleppo in Syria accompanied Matthieu Aikins

Moises Saman is one of the leading conflict photographers of our time. In recent years, he has worked in Afghanistan, Egypt, Iraq, and Libya. In the August Issue of WIRED, Saman’s photographs and interviews from Aleppo in Syria accompanied Matthieu Aikins’ article about bomb-makers in the rebel homemade arms industry. The assignment was Saman’s third visit Syria since the onset of civil unrest in March 2011. Early in the conflict, he documented protests against the regime in the cities of Hama and Homs and in 2012, Saman was in Aleppo shortly after the Free Syrian Army had taken control.

Moises Saman in Cairo

“In the two years since I moved here, every milestone of the revolution has been marred by an outburst of street violence,” he says. “However, the events of the past week are unprecedented: rocks have been replaced by sniper bullets, city mosques transformed into front line field hospitals, and isolated street clashes superseded by systematized killings.”