Turning Points: Life-Changing Moments by Magnum Photographers - Photographs and texts courtesy of Magnum Photos | LensCulture

From iconic images of major world events, to intimate moments of pleasure and delight — here is an outstanding selection of remarkable images from Magnum Photos — each with a personal story

Magnum Photos Names 5 New Nominees | PDNPulse

Members of the Magnum Photos collective voted to welcome five new photographers as Nominees to the agency. The new nominees are: Sim Chi Yin (Singapore) Gregory Halpern (USA) Rafal Milach (Poland) Lua Ribeira (Spain) Lindokuhle Sobekwa (South Africa) Magn

Sim Chi Yin (Singapore) Gregory Halpern (USA) Rafal Milach (Poland) Lua Ribeira (Spain) Lindokuhle Sobekwa (South Africa)

7 with VII: All About Gear

Expert photographers on the lenses, notebooks and tools they carry

We asked Facebook, Instagram and Twitter followers to submit questions about gear for the second installment of 7 with VII. Read on for the 7 answers from VII’s Ron Haviv, Sim Chi Yin, Ashley Gilbertson, Arthur Bondar, Ed Kashi, Poulomi Basu and Sarker Protick

Photo Zines That Explore Singapore's Identity

A series of zines produced by photographers in Singapore offer insider’s views of the country, ranging from transformations in its urban landscape to its social ills to the hidden history of one participant’s grandfather.

For years, Sim Chi Yin had felt unique, if out of place, within her family. Since starting out at Singapore’s The Straits Times in 2001, and later switching careers to become a full-time photographer, she never seemed to gain their approval.

LightBox | Time

Read the latest stories about LightBox on Time

In 2010, Sim Chi Yin threw away the “cushy, secure life” that comes with the job of staff foreign correspondent for the Straits Times, Singapore’s popular English-language daily, to become a freelance photographer. “I wanted to learn to swim or sink on my own,” she tells TIME.

A Familiar Destiny to Photograph the New China

Sim Chi Yin walked away form a comfortable reporting job to become a photographer with an interest in social issues. Her gamble paid off.

Sim Chi Yin had a cushy expat life in Beijing working as a reporter for The Singapore Straits Times, writing long feature stories and sometimes taking photos. The company paid for her education at the London School of Economics in exchange for eight years of employment. She had health insurance, a pension and job security. So why did she walk away from that after nine years?