Beyond war with conflict photographer Yuri Kozyrev

Coffee and conversation in Moscow with one of the great conflict photographers of our time.

He talked in Moscow with host Nathan Thornburgh, who worked alongside Kozyrev throughout Russia and the Caucasus while they were both at TIME magazine. They talked about the late great Stanley Greene, about traveling with mujahedin, and about why it was hard to quit war for good.

Perspective | Photographers edit photographers: The late Stanley Greene called Yuri Kozyrev’s war photography ‘lyricism in darkness’

An American war photographer selects the work of a Russian war photographer.

In the final installment of our series featuring the Noor agency photographers editing one another, we show 10 images by the renowned Russian war photographer Yuri Kozyrev chosen by the late Stanley Greene.

Perspective | A Russian photojournalist selects powerful images about Africa made by his Italian colleague

PHOTOGRAPHERS edit PHOTOGRAPHERS: Francesco Zizola spent years covering the suffering of African people and the route across the Mediterranean Sea by those seeking refuge in Europe. Yuri Kozyrev selects work from his archive.

The first edit is by Russian photojournalist Yuri Kozyrev, who selected work from Italian photojournalist Francesco Zizola. “Italians are such amazing people.  They enjoy life, they love their food, but they are also very serious. Francesco is a very serious photojournalist and I greatly admire his work on Africa and the refugee crisis,” Kozyrev said.

‘We Clean History’: Thoughts on Another Crimea

I recently reread Phillip Knightley’s The First Casualty, a commanding account of the role of war correspondents from the 1854 Crimean War through until the 2003 Invasion of Iraq. The book brillian…

Another Crimea brings together six photographers from the prominent photographic agencies Noor, VII and Magnum. The photographers (Christopher Morris, Francesco Zizola, Gueorgui Pinkhassov, Olivia Arthur, Pep Bonet and Yuri Kozyrev) each produced a documentary photo series, or in one case a film, in the region over ten days in summer 2014

Iraq: On the Front Lines of the War Against ISIS

Photographer Yuri Kozyrev goes back to Iraq

Photojournalist Yuri Kozyrev has lived through the full arc of the war in Iraq. Based in Baghdad from 2002 to 2009, he documented the U.S.-led invasion and occupation of the country, from the initial “shock and awe” phase of bombardment through the fall of Baghdad in April 2003. He was on the scene in Tikrit when U.S. forces pulled the deposed dictator Saddam Hussein from his underground hideout.

Yuri Kozyrev in Iraq, 2002-2016. Here are his best photos

A look back at 14 years of work in Iraq

Photojournalist Yuri Kozyrev has lived through the full arc of the war in Iraq – from the initial “shock and awe” phase of bombardment through the fall of Baghdad in April 2003. He worked on the front lines as more and more Iraqis grew to reject the U.S. presence in their country and some came to support an armed insurrection against the American forces. He photographed the war day by day as the insurgency metastasized into a brutal sectarian civil war, sowing the seeds of extremism that continue to devastate the country to this day.

Yuri Kozyrev: 15 Years of Chechnya's Troubled History

The photographer has witnessed Chechnya's dramatic evolution

When they returned to the base, it was clear from the glares of the troops that they all blamed Kozyrev for the fiasco, he says, and Gen. Otrakovsky advised the photographer to leave in the morning. “He said it may not be safe anymore for me to stay among his men,” Kozyrev remembers.

North Korea in Pictures: A Mind-Blowing Photo Gallery

When shooting our North Korea story, photographer Yuri Kozyrev didn't just stop at the film festival. He documented Pyongyang street life, the seldom-seen countryside, and even an amusement park. Here, we've collected thirty-four of our favorite images fr

When shooting our North Korea story, photographer Yuri Kozyrev didn't just stop at the film festival. He documented Pyongyang street life, the seldom-seen countryside, and even an amusement park. Here, we've collected thirty-four of our favorite images from his visit

LightBox | Time

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In late 2013, the medical humanitarian organizationDoctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) sent four photographers and videographers—Kate Brooks, Ton Koene, Moises Saman and Yuri Kozyrev—to outposts in Iraq, Lebanon and Jordan, where MSF provides help to Syrian refugees. The project, shot over a single day, chronicles the Syrian war’s reach beyond the country’s borders. Phil Zabriskie, Doctors Without Borders’ managing editor, speaks to TIME LightBox.

Iraq's Current Conflict Foretold

As rebel forces capture Iraqi cities, veteran photojournalists look at the lessons learned and the obstacles that lie ahead for independent coverage in the region.

The growing instability in Iraq was on the minds of members of the NOOR collective, who were in New York last week for an agency meeting. Andrea Bruce, Stanley Greene, Yuri Kozyrev and Kadir Van Lohuizen — all veterans of covering the war — spoke with Michael Kamber, the author of “Photojournalists on War: The Untold Stories From Iraq,” an oral history of those who covered the conflict. Their conversation has been edited.

LightBox | Time

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It had taken years, and several attempts each, to get Syrian visas for photographer Yuri Kozyrev and myself. Despite all that waiting, nothing had quite prepared us for what we would encounter in Syria

LightBox | Time

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Yuri Kozyrev, TIME’s contract photographer, was one of them. His grandparents owned an apartment in the center of Sochi, within view of the sea port’s elegant spire, and he would visit them each year between May and October starting from the age of three

Photographer Yuri Kozyrev on covering conflict

Since starting out 25 years ago, Russian photojournalist Yuri Kozyrev has documented wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, Egypt, Libya, Yemen and Syria. Yuri talks to Tina Remiz about finding new ways of telling stories...

LightBox | Time

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The work feels contemporary and well seen, reflecting hidden cultural phenomenons  allowing for a Where's Waldo pleasure of finding much more below the surface when the work is revisited.  Working Title: Significant Gestures captures isolation, anger, technology, stress, what we consume, and even American Girl Dolls in just a few images--truly capturing the human experience at this moment in time

LightBox | Time

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In 1955, a decade into the Cold War, the Museum of Modern Art in New York opened its doors to a monumental photography exhibition, an aesthetic manifesto visualizing ideas of peace and “the essential oneness of mankind.” Edward Steichen, then director of the MoMA photography department, curated 503 photographs — from a pool of two million — by 273 artists from 68 countries with the at-once simple and grand goal of definitively “explaining man to man.”

LightBox | Time

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In the five years Baghdad was my home, I got to work (or just hang out) with some of the finest news photographers in the world: Yuri Kozyrev, Franco Pagetti, Kate Brooks, James Nachtwey, Robert Nicklesberg, Lynsey Addario, the late Chris Hondros… the list is as long as it is distinguished. Their immense talent and incredible bravery combined to make the Iraq war arguably the most exhaustively photographed conflict in human history. This selection doesn’t begin to capture the immensity of their collective achievement, but it is evocative of the horrors — and just occasionally, hope — they were able to chronicle.

LightBox | Time

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there is the equivalent of more than 90,000 twenty-foot containers of equipment all over Afghanistan. All together, there is $36 billion worth of vehicles, weapons systems, repair parts and utter junk scattered throughout the country, and bringing it home will cost an estimated $5.7 billion.