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A Photographer’s Loving Ode to Small-Town Texas | The New Yorker

The five decades that Keith Carter has spent documenting small-town Texas more than make up for the fact that he was born in Wisconsin. His family moved to the town of Beaumont when he was just a few years old, in the early nineteen-fifties, and his single mother took up commercial portrait photography to support them. Mesmerized by the red-tinted darkroom printing he witnessed in their kitchens growing up, he turned to photography after graduating from Lamar University with a business degree. He has since built a prolific career making art of and for the place he’s from. “My home town,” Carter has said, “is the backdrop for a rich East Texas storytelling culture, an occasional mystifying spirituality, and abundant folklore,” qualities that manifest themselves in the rich, allegorical images he produces.

You can now watch the entire “Everybody Street” documentary film for free on YouTube and Amazon Prime Video – Leica Rumors

The full length “Everybody Street” documentary film is now available on YouTube (with ads). You can also stream it for free on Amazon Prime Video (or purchase the DVD from Amazon):

CJR Special Report: Photojournalism’s moment of reckoning – Columbia Journalism Review

In interviews with more than 50 people, in a CJR investigation spanning more than five months, photojournalists described behavior from editors and colleagues that ranged from assault to unwanted advances to comments on their appearance or bodies when they were trying to work. And now, as the #MeToo moment has prompted change across a range of industries—from Hollywood to broadcasting to the arts—photojournalists are calling for their own moment of reckoning.

The Surrealist Photos of Ralph Gibson – The New York Times

“I wanted to make photographs you could look at for a long period of time, photographs that were not ephemera, photographs that were made to last and could support a great depth of content,” he said. “That’s the opposite of working for the media.”