UPDATE: Another Contest Scam? Who Runs Monochrome and Monovisions Awards? | PDN Online

Photographers who were asked to judge the Monochrome Awards, a black-and-white photography competition that charges entry fees ranging from $15-$25 tell PDN that they never judged the competition. The stories of these photographers, and the refusal of Monochrome Awards representatives to respond to PDN’s questions about the organization and one of its organizers, Sebastian Markis, suggest there may be a connection between the Monochrome Awards and the International Photographer of the Year awards, another competition that came under scrutiny recently and is suspected of falsely promoting its jurors. Markis is also involved in a third organization, Monovision Magazine, which runs a black-and-white photography competition, PDN has learned.

Photo Contest Judges Raise Alarm: We Didn’t Judge Anything…

There’s something strange going on with the International Photographer of the Year (IPOTY) photo contest. 11 of the 14 photographers listed as judges for the IPOTY 2017 contest say they weren’t asked to judge a single thing before the winners were announced in February (and the other 3 couldn’t be contacted).

National Geographic: ‘For Decades, Our Coverage Was Racist’

National Geographic made ripples today by acknowledging that the famous yellow-bordered magazine spent decades of its history publishing photographs and stories that were racist.

Photographer Exposed for Using Film Set Shots as ‘Documentary’ Photos

As Oskouei completed his film and entered it into international festivals, Souri wrapped his photo essay Waiting Girls (Persian: دختران انتظار), a series of black and white images from the correctional facility. In all international publications and contests, Souri’s photo series has a more provocative title, Waiting for Capital Punishment. Souri never informed the director nor asked for his permission to publish his pictures.

Prime Collective Drops Photographer Following Sexual Harassment Allegations | PDNPulse

Prime, the cooperative photo agency, announced this week that it has dropped Christian Rodriguez from its roster in October 2017 after an unnamed female photographer reported he had tried to pressure her into posing nude. In an article posted March 7 on the website, members of the collective noted that they had voted to remove him in November; his work was taken off the collective’s website. Since then, other women shared similar complaints about Rodriguez. “To date, approximately 32 women have come forward to share their stories,” the article states. Prime states that some incidents occurred within recent weeks, others took place years ago.

A Black and White Comparison: What Does Retouching Tell Us About Photojournalism? – PhotoShelter Blog

Do Frayer’s images pop? Yes, they do – especially when compared to Nachtwey’s. But does the retouching style support or detract from the content of the photos? And more importantly, does it matter? I would suggest that if any material percentage of the public believes that the scene has been staged, then insofar as photojournalism is concerned, there is a problem. But in today’s world where punchy Instagram-style images have influenced a news-weary public’s perception of photography, perhaps the discussion is moot.

Sex, Lies and Lemmings: Hossein Fatemi and the toxification of photojournalism – duckrabbit

The year long world tour of photojournalist Hossein Fatemi’s controversial Iranian photos is coming to an end.

Should the Media Show Photos from School Shootings? It’s Complicated

Fundamental questions remain: What is the line between informing audiences and exploiting victims and their families? Should the media find a balance between shocking and shielding audiences? And when it comes to mass shootings – and gun violence more broadly – if outlets did include more bloody images, would it even make a difference?

Should the Media Publish Photos of Gun Violence? – PhotoShelter Blog

The “common sense” position rejects publication of death photos out of respect for the victim and their families, but the truth is that the media has had an uncomfortable relationship with images of violence, murder and death almost since the inception of photography.

Photographer: Beware ImageRights International

Notable American photographer Kalliope Amorphous has published a warning to other photographers who are considering protecting their copyright using ImageRights International. She accuses the company of an “egregious grab” that forces photographers to use the company’s legal services.

A Treatise On Landscape Photography’s Dark Side

a potentially disturbing trend has emerged and become quite popular, especially on social media – not only are landscape photographers using Photoshop to control contrast, white balance, saturation, and sharpening, they are also using it to: add in objects that were not in the photograph such as a person, meteors, the moon, a mountain, or the Milky Way core; add objects that are literally not even possible to be seen in the scene depicted such as galactic objects, the moon, and the Milky Way core; or, to grossly exaggerate the size of certain objects such as mountains, lakes, rivers, people, etc. On the surface, it seems that certain landscape photographers have become so desperate for a sliver of social media attention in a suddenly over-crowded field that they are incapable of restraint. Or, it’s just art, let it be. Which one?

How graphic is too graphic when covering Florida high school shooting? | Poynter

Within minutes of the school shooting at Parkland High School in Broward County, Florida, video of the shooting, including shots and screams flowed online. Graphic video of a bloody body gave a hint of the horrors that would unfold. Another student snapped photos while crouched in a classroom while another recorded SWAT officers herding children out of an auditorium. I am not linking to those images here. You can find them easily if you want to.

How the “Global Leader” in Journalism Fails Photographers by Promoting Free Photos – PhotoShelter Blog

Put aside the intellectual laziness of using an interview format for a expository piece on how to illustrate the news, but this Poynter piece entitled “These Tools Will Help You Find the Right Images for Your Stories” is garbage.

Peter Lik Called Out by Photographers Over ‘Faked’ Moon Photo

A number of observations are being made about this photo — many of them arguments as to why it can’t possibly be real. One of the most glaring ones for many people is the fact that some of the clouds in the photo appear to be behind the moon.

10 Questions for a Founder : TruePic – Kaptur

With each iteration of Photoshop, it is easier and easier to alter images, making it impossible to spot the alterations. Soon, with AI generated images taking over in many fields, it will be impossible to trust if an image is an actual photograph or a complete fabrication. Photography is in danger of losing its essential tie to reality and truth. Enters TruePic. With an array of patented technologies, the company offers a solid counterbalance to this seemingly unstoppable wave of reality-altering technologies. It certifies that a photograph is 100% original and has not been tampered with. We spoke with CEO Jeff McGregor to learn more:

#MenToo: On Sexual Misconduct in the Photo Industry

In light of another prominent figure in the photography industry being accused of sexual misconduct, I feel compelled to pen my feelings about it all, specifically what it has done to MY profession of choice; photojournalism.

Vanity Fair Gives Reese Witherspoon and Oprah Extra ‘Leg’ and Hand

Vanity Fair just unveiled its latest Hollywood issue, which features a cover photo of 12 Hollywood stars captured by photographer Annie Leibovitz. But people are talking about the photos today for all the wrong reasons: the cover photo (shown above) appears to show Reese Witherspoon with a 3rd leg and another photo definitely shows Oprah with a 3rd hand.

Update on a Photo Scam: Photographer Lucky to Get Money Back After Fake Fader Assignment | PDNPulse

A photographer reached out to PDN last week with details of a fake assignment scam that nearly cost him $4100. A person pretending to be an editor for The Fader, Patrick McDermott, contacted the photographer in late December with an offer of an assignment to shoot a fashion editorial for the magazine. He accepted and was sent a check to cover his fee and expenses for models and crew. He was instructed to use models from an agency that turned out to be fake. The agency demanded fees in advance, and the photographer deposited $4100 into the bank account of the fake modeling agency. Then he found out the check from the client had been recalled.