Interviews

David Hurn’s Social Arizona Trips – The Eye of Photography

Magnum photographer David Hurn’s documentary photographs are distinguished by their quiet observation and remarkable insight. “Life as it unfolds in front of the camera is full of so much complexity, wonder and surprise that I find it unnecessary to create new realities,” he writes. “There is more pleasure, for me, in things as they are.” Hurn fell in love with the state of Arizona, in the United States, and made several trips back between 1979 and 2001, turning his eye to ordinary Arizonians in their daily life, their schools, exercise classes, holidays and their landscape. His new book entitled Arizona Trips contains more than 150 photographs on the subject. The British photographer is here in conversation with writer Sir Christopher Frayling.

Telling Complex Truths About Africa at LagosPhoto Festival – The New York Times

The eighth edition of the LagosPhoto Festival opened last week and runs through Dec. 15th. Azu Nwagbogu, the festival’s founder and director, spoke with James Estrin about photography in Africa. Their conversation has been edited for clarity and brevity.

A Marriage of Lives and Photos – The New York Times

The photographers Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb have produced a book, “Slant Rhymes,” that pairs images by each of them in diptychs. In an email exchange with James Estrin, they discussed the book, photography and their relationship.

Ken Weingart interviews Edward Burtynsky | LENSCRATCH

Edward Burtynsky is a legendary Canadian fine art photographer who specializes in chronicling the extraction and destruction of the earth and it’s minerals, mines and more. His images bring a painterly beauty to the banal. A photographer and master printer for over forty years, Burtynsky has pioneered a unique way of looking at the planet. I had the opportunity to speak with the artist at the Von Lintel Gallery in Los Angeles.

Mark Peterson: Photographing the Hate in Charlottesville Up Close | PDNPulse

The New Republic has published Mark Peterson’s dramatic images of clashes in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend between white nationalists at the so-called “Unite the Right” rally, and counter-protesters who showed up to demonstrate against the rising fascist movement. Peterson has covered US politics since the 1990s. We caught up with him to find out why he covered the rally, what he was trying to accomplish, and how he positioned himself to photograph the white nationalist leaders—and the violence—at such close range.

What it’s like to be President Trump’s White House photographer | PBS NewsHour

From the start of the presidency of Donald Trump, it’s been photos not snapped by the official White House photographer that have gotten the most attention. There were the press images that confirmed his inauguration crowd size was smaller than the first Obama inauguration, that showed the president’s tie held in place with Scotch tape, and that revealed a stone-faced Pope Francis in his meeting with Trump at the Vatican. As the weeks passed, media reports began to suggest that Trump was actually avoiding Shealah Craighead, his new photographer, as many pictures posted to social media by the White House were taken by other members of staff. And after day 50 of the presidency, when Craighead released her first real set of photos, photography websites declared her a rigid, boring photographer, unable or willing to take candid or unguarded photos of the president.

An Interview with Photographer Richard McLaren

What do President Nelson Mandela, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Tina Turner, Halle Berry, Gwyneth Paltrow, Pierce Brosnan, Jon Bon Jovi, Marc Anthony, Mariah Carey, Jennifer Lopez, Eva Mendes, Orlando Bloom, Patrick Swayze and Heath Ledger have in common? The magical lens of Richard McLaren has captured them all. And this is only a small sampling of famous people who McLaren has photographed in his four decades in the industry.

It’s Nice That

It’s Nice That | Mustafah Abdulaziz’s 15-year photography project depicts the global water crisis

15 years and 32 countries: Mustafah Abdulaziz’s Water project presents an outstanding full-time commitment to documenting our relationship with water. The initial idea to embark on such a journey began in 2011 and has since developed into a monumental ongoing photography series that couldn’t be more necessary worldwide. Ideas surrounding water and our intimate affair we have with the natural resource are often underrepresented; water connects everything, it’s the source of life and the stem of all routes. Our planet is in jeopardy and Mustafah aims to tell the story of this crisis through powerful imagery. We were lucky enough to talk to him to find out more about this project and the impact it will have on a global level.

Documenting the Anguish of War: An Interview With Photojournalist Paolo Pellegrin – Pacific Standard

After more than two peripatetic decades of assignments in the Balkans, Lebanon, Palestine, and Afghanistan, among many other places of conflict, photographer Paolo Pellegrin is still out there.

A Collective Determined to Share the Untold American Stories

Just recently, a handful of talented photographers launched American Reportage, a collective dedicated to telling stories about the American experience. Founded by photographers Pete Marovich, Justin Merriman, Brian Plonka, Jeff Swensen, Kathleen Flynn and Adria Malcolm, the goal is for its members to produce in-depth stories of people and communities whose voices often go unheard.  

We spoke with two of the founding photographers, Justin Merriman and PhotoShelter member Pete Marovich, about the inspiration behind the project.

What The Photo Editor of VanityFair.Com Wants

Last month I was flipping through Vanity Fair, when I caught Chiara Marinai’s name on the masthead. Chiara is the Photo Editor of VanityFair.com, which means any imagery you see on their site goes through her first.

I connected with Chiara over email to find out a little more about what her role entails, including some of her biggest challenges, her specific photography needs, and the one thing she does before making a final decision about a photographer.

Ken Weingart interviews Mark Seliger | LENSCRATCH

Mark Seliger is one of the best-known editorial portrait photographers in the U.S., for over thirty years. He succeeded Annie Leibovitz as the designated “chief photographer” for Rolling Stone Magazine and has photographed over 125 Rolling Stone covers. His magazine work in portrait and fashion continues to be extensive and includes: Italian Vogue, Elle, Vanity Fair, GQ, and others. He has won many of the top photo awards worldwide, and continues to create self-realized projects and endeavors. I had the opportunity to talk to Mark about his most recent personal project On Christopher Street: Portraits, which is being exhibited at the Von Lintel Gallery in Los Angeles.

Edward Burtynsky – Interview Part Two – Luminous Landscape

Continuing my interview with Ed Burtynsky, we talk about every photographer’s favorite subject, cameras. Ed shares with us his evolution of camera systems from 4×5 and 8×10 film to the Hasselblad 100 mega-pixel digital camera. Much of Ed’s work is shot from high altitude, and he has a few stories about how that is accomplished. You’ll also hear why during the film days Ed decided to shoot his work with color negative film. He shares his evolution of color printing and how he went from a hybrid color workflow to his eventual full digital workflow.

Vendôme : Who’s a photographer? #2 – The Eye of Photography

For its thirteenth edition and continuing last year’s programme, the Promenades photographiques de Vendôme is continuing its reflection on the theme Qui est photographe? Odile Andrieu, the festival’s artistic director, tells us about the 2017 programme.

Edward Burtynsky – Interview Part One – Luminous Landscape

Edward is a true photographer because for him taking the photo is one part, but making the print is the second and the most important part.  His prints are large, very large.  Because of this, he has had to use cameras that would allow him to print big.  He’s worked with 8×10 cameras and, as of lately, the Hasselblad H6D 100.

An Interview with Photographer Joe McNally

Joe McNally is a photographer and a storyteller. The word photography comes from Greek and means to write with light. That, in a nutshell, is what McNally does: he a writes with light, whether it be daylight or Speedlight. And for a student who started out as a writing major and ended up being a photographer, that is just the perfect result.

War photographer Alessio Romenzi on covering conflict and managing his fear – LA Times

Photographer Alessio Remenzi has been covering conflict in the Middle East since the Arab Spring and was among the first photographers smuggled into Syria to cover the civil war. Most recently he has been covering the battle for Mosul, Iraq. He was previously interviewed by The Times in 2012. He recently discussed covering the fighting in Iraq.

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