Amazônia: Sebastião Salgado’s Photo Essay Nine Years in the Making

A conversation with Brazilian photographer Sebastião Salgado about his epic photo essay on the Amazônia nine years in the making.

Photography is another thing. Photography is the memory of the society that we’re part of. And the bigger problem with the smartphone is that it goes to your archive that you never use anymore. Sometimes you lose everything, sometimes, you drop into the cloud and don’t use it anymore. Photography is tangible. You touch it, have it in your hands, see it repeatedly, and I can do nothing from the smartphone.

Interview: Ed Kashi – “Abandoned Moments” — Analog Forever Magazine

You must believe in yourself, believe in this work and be ready and willing to work harder than you’ve ever worked. You must be able to withstand a seemingly inhumane amount of disappointment and rejection, learn to navigate the unseemly politics and favoritism that is rife in most creative fields, and basically be incredibly resilient. And you must bring your ideas to the table. You must be insatiably curious, sensitive, aware of your surroundings, learn the customs and mores of the places you work, want to engage with people, dedicate yourself to issues, know how to write and express yourself, be gracious, humble, and bring an open heart and mind

A Conversation with Rob Hornstra

Ordinarily, I would have simply introduced my conversation with Rob Hornstra with his history as a photographer, most notably his work with writer Arnold van Bruggen in the Caucasus: The Sochi Project. That work entailed a large number of highly successful self-published photobooks, all of them crowdfunded at a time when such an approach was only beginning to become more widely used. It ended up getting the pair being banned from Russia. There now is a new project, The Europeans, which follows similar ideas in a different setting.

Joe McNally Dishes "The Real Deal" - PhotoShelter Blog

Nearly twenty years ago, I came across Joe McNally’s photo of a Northrop Grumman X-47A Pegasus that he took for a National Geographic story entitled “The Future of Flying Faster Farther Smarter.” The piece was notable for being the magazine’s first to fea

“The Real Deal: Field Notes from the Life of a Working Photographer” (Rocky Nook) is part memoir, part business advice, and part technical notes. If you’ve ever contemplated a life in photography – especially as a freelancer – this is a must read (and the photos aren’t so bad either!). Joe’s writing is crisp and entertaining, and it’s a surprisingly quick read even at 378 pages.

50 Questions with Photographer Alec Soth

A Pound of Pictures is a window into both our world and Soth’s process itself. In every photograph, there is what we see and what lies beneath. Much the same way, Soth answers our 50 questions with consideration, sincerity and just the right amount of playfulness.

Ralph Gibson: "I am an insider, not an observer"

On November 4, 2021, as part of Leica‘s celebration of photography, American photographer Ralph Gibson received the Leica Hall of Fame Award 2021 for Lifetime Achievement. He is also being honored with a retrospective exhibition, on view through the end o

Here, Ralph Gibson shares his vision on photography and the epoch we live in.

How to Start a Photo Magazine in a Pandemic - PhotoShelter Blog

The past few decades have been unkind to photo magazines. Many industry stalwarts have gone defunct, while others have moved to online editions only. Ironically, many photographers still believe in the photographic print, even though they might contend th

In January, I chatted with renown photojournalist Kenneth Jarecke who had just announced the creation of The Curious Society, a large format photo magazine featuring the work of some of the world’s best photojournalists and documentary photographers. The goal wasn’t only to publish a visual tour de force on a quarterly basis, but to also pay photographers a traditional space rate that made producing such work economically viable.

Photographing the 10 Year Anniversary of Japan's Fukushima Nuclear Accident - PhotoShelter Blog

James Whitlow Delano traveled to Sendai, Japan to capture images of a region battered by a tsunami and nuclear reactor meltdown on the 10 year anniversary.

Photojournalist and Founder of @everydayclimatechange James Whitlow Delano has lived and worked in Tokyo for decades, and has covered the disaster, its aftermath, and the glacially slow rebuild. For the 10th anniversary of the tragic event, Delano created a haunting photo and video package for the New York Times. I reached out to him via email to learn more about his experiences.

Nat Geo's Editor-in-Chief Answers Her 7 Most-Asked Photography Questions

Susan Goldberg has been editor in chief at National Geographic for seven years. In the history of Nat Geo, which started in 1888, she is the 10th editor

Today, when everyone has a camera with them 24/7 (their phones), anyone can get lucky and make one great picture. We are looking for those photographers who can really craft a story: develop a unique idea, engage in the research, make compelling images, and build a powerful narrative across a series of photographs. We have core niches – among them, wildlife and the natural environment, archaeology, science, people, and cultures – and are always looking for photographers who are interested in these topics. But at its core, you do have to be able to take amazing photographs!

A Conversation with Karolina Gembara

KG: It’s called APP [Archiwum Protestów Publicznych — Archive of Public Protest]. This is Rafał Milach’s idea (my friend from Sputnik Photos). He invited other photographers who have been present in the streets since 2015 or 2016 to create an online platform where people could look at images from different places, from different protests, and use them.

The Curious Society Wants to Print a New Photojournalism Magazine - PhotoShelter Blog

Veteran photojournalist Kenneth Jarecke announced the creation of The Curious Society, a membership-based, quarterly print publication for contemporary photojournalism.

A few weeks ago, veteran photojournalist Kenneth Jarecke announced the creation of The Curious Society, a membership-based, quarterly print publication for contemporary photojournalism. While some might reflexively balk at starting a printed magazine in the digital age, Jarecke believes there is a market for people who want a tactile experience, and one that forces them to more slowly appreciate photography – and if he’s right, he’ll also be paying photographers a meaningful licensing fee in return.

Blind – Six Spreads: Ralph Gibson Visits Sacred Land

On his friend Helmut Newton: “I was talking to Helmut about his commercial photography, and I said to him, ‘Helmut, what do you tell yourself when you get up in the morning?’ He says, ‘Ralphie, I get up in the morning and I say to myself, 'I'll show those fuckers.'"