Interviews

This BuzzFeed Photo Editor is Always on the Lookout For New Photographers

Today, Kate Bubacz is the Senior Photo Editor at BuzzFeed News. We talked with Kate to learn some of her challenges, mistakes she sees photographers making, and where she looks to find new talent (and yes, she’s always looking).

The Trauma of Life on Skid Row, in Photos

She has been photographing life on Skid Row since the fall of 2015, and in the last year, Suzanne Stein has borne witness to the acute suffering of others. She’s heard firsthand from survivors of rape and abuse. She’s befriended people who are addicted to heroin. She’s been in the presence of infections and illness, true life and death situations. And throughout all of it, a fundamental decency and humanity have remained at the heart of all her images. 

An Interview with Fine Art Photographer Roger Ballen

I want to go out and take photographs. I just relax and keep a focused mind and make the photographs. I don’t have any particular goals. I’ve always said that if you define my pictures with words other than enigmatic or mysterious, then the pictures are bad.

The Social Photo Editor of The New York Times Breaks Down Her Job

At a large publication like The New York Times, there are a number of photo editors – including those in charge of curating great photography on Instagram. To find out what these photo editors are looking for, we caught up with their Social Photo Editor Kerri MacDonald, who oversees the @nytimes and @nytarchives Instagram accounts.

Eugene Richards: A Life in Photography

The George Eastman Museum in Rochester will open the first museum retrospective of the work of the photographer Eugene Richards on June 10. The exhibit, “Eugene Richards: The Run-On of Time,” covers his career as a photojournalist and documentary photographer from 1968 to the present and was produced in collaboration with the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Mo. Curated by April Watson and Lisa Hostetler, the retrospective includes 146 photographs, 15 books, and selected videos. It is accompanied by a catalog distributed by Yale University Press.

Q & A with Karl Baden

Every Day has received media attention because of what it is and what the media’s function has become. Although a number of journalists have written/commented about the project thoughtfully and with insight, much of the time I find myself in a position of trying to explain my motivation[s] in a way that might compel the interviewer not to file the project in the Ripley’s Believe it or Not/Guinness Book of World Records/Weird News Dept. Of course I fail more than I succeed; after all, one reason I’m being interviewed is because they already have me pegged. To some extent, this brings us back to the lack-of-website issue

Democratizing the Sky: Drones in Visual Journalism

The New York Times staff photographer Josh Haner was an early adopter of drone photography. His earliest forays were with a $60 gadget that he maneuvered around his living room. Since then, he has aimed ever higher, doing videos and stills high above the Gobi Desert and the Marshall Islands. He has embraced the technology in ways that add a stunning dimension to his storytelling, while at the same time presenting unforeseen challenges

11 Night Photographers on Mischief and Magic After Dark

In the darkness, everything that was once familiar becomes alien. Photographers who choose wandering over sleep grow to understand the strange, parallel world that emerges under the moonlight, and every frame they bring back with them has a story behind it.

Q & A with Ivars Gravlejs

In such a configuration people will find out immediately when you photograph them. If your intervention with the camera is objectionable for them, they will quickly fight back and virtually compress you. 

Richard Mosse on Using a Military Grade Camera to Find Signs of Life in Refugee Camps

On a tip from a friend, Mosse bought a military-grade camera meant for long-range battle surveillance that doesn’t see visible light. Instead, this camera sees heat and produces crisp black-and-white images that are exposed based on the relative warmth of everything in the frame. Mosse then used this camera, intended to track and target, as a way to document displacement and the daily fight for survival by the refugees living in camps across Europe for a new project called Heat Maps.

An interview with Harry Benson

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Photography is the easiest thing to keep you motivated. The camera will basically do whatever you want it to do. There is a simplicity and excitement; it doesn’t have to be complicated. You can judge what’s a good picture, what’s a bad picture – don’t take anybody else’s opinion – it’s what you like.

Tim Tadder Interview

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Tim Tadder is an internationally acclaimed photographic artist. Most recognized for his highly inventive conceptual advertising photography Tadder has been ranked in the top 200 photographers worldwide by the prestigious Luezer Archive Magazine 8 years running. In 2015 Epson, the world leader in photographic printing technology recognized Tadder as one of the top influential photographers, producing a TV commercial and worldwide ad campaign featuring Tadder and his work.

Musée Magazine : Interview with Alex Soth, Photographer of the social landscape

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AS: That’s a tough one, and I love processing Szarkowski quotes. He also talked about how photography, on a mental level, is just pointing. It’s just pointing your finger, and saying, “look at that.” And when you point to something you’re not showing the molecules, you’re not showing its history, its ‘everything.’ You’re showing this thing in this context, in this fraction of a second, in this light. Everything beneath the surface exists, but it’s imagined. And one has to come to terms with that.

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