Photographing the 10 Year Anniversary of Japan's Fukushima Nuclear Accident - PhotoShelter Blog

James Whitlow Delano traveled to Sendai, Japan to capture images of a region battered by a tsunami and nuclear reactor meltdown on the 10 year anniversary.

Photojournalist and Founder of @everydayclimatechange James Whitlow Delano has lived and worked in Tokyo for decades, and has covered the disaster, its aftermath, and the glacially slow rebuild. For the 10th anniversary of the tragic event, Delano created a haunting photo and video package for the New York Times. I reached out to him via email to learn more about his experiences.

Nat Geo's Editor-in-Chief Answers Her 7 Most-Asked Photography Questions

Susan Goldberg has been editor in chief at National Geographic for seven years. In the history of Nat Geo, which started in 1888, she is the 10th editor

Today, when everyone has a camera with them 24/7 (their phones), anyone can get lucky and make one great picture. We are looking for those photographers who can really craft a story: develop a unique idea, engage in the research, make compelling images, and build a powerful narrative across a series of photographs. We have core niches – among them, wildlife and the natural environment, archaeology, science, people, and cultures – and are always looking for photographers who are interested in these topics. But at its core, you do have to be able to take amazing photographs!

A Conversation with Karolina Gembara

KG: It’s called APP [Archiwum Protestów Publicznych — Archive of Public Protest]. This is Rafał Milach’s idea (my friend from Sputnik Photos). He invited other photographers who have been present in the streets since 2015 or 2016 to create an online platform where people could look at images from different places, from different protests, and use them.

The Curious Society Wants to Print a New Photojournalism Magazine - PhotoShelter Blog

Veteran photojournalist Kenneth Jarecke announced the creation of The Curious Society, a membership-based, quarterly print publication for contemporary photojournalism.

A few weeks ago, veteran photojournalist Kenneth Jarecke announced the creation of The Curious Society, a membership-based, quarterly print publication for contemporary photojournalism. While some might reflexively balk at starting a printed magazine in the digital age, Jarecke believes there is a market for people who want a tactile experience, and one that forces them to more slowly appreciate photography – and if he’s right, he’ll also be paying photographers a meaningful licensing fee in return.

Blind – Six Spreads: Ralph Gibson Visits Sacred Land

On his friend Helmut Newton: “I was talking to Helmut about his commercial photography, and I said to him, ‘Helmut, what do you tell yourself when you get up in the morning?’ He says, ‘Ralphie, I get up in the morning and I say to myself, 'I'll show those fuckers.'"

Meet the Jury: Feature Shoot Emerging Photography Judge Cheriss May - Feature Shoot

As part of this year’s Emerging Photography Awards, Feature Shoot is offering two major exhibition opportunities to up-and-coming photographers of all genres working across the world. Three to five photographers…

Beyond her career as a leading editorial and portrait photographer Cheriss May is also the current President of Women Photojournalists of Washington, an organization fostering success for women in photojournalism and educating the public about the role of women in the field. She’s also an adjunct professor at her alma mater, Howard University, where she teaches visual communications. Read on to learn more about May’s work and her hopes for the future of the industry.

Q & A with Sinna Nasseri

Photo by Kyle Myles Sinna Nasseri is a photographer based in New York City. He is currently on a road trip  around the United States. • BA:...

Sinna Nasseri is a photographer based in New York City. He is currently on a road trip around the United States.

Q & A with Ed Templeton

Ed Templeton is a photographer, artist, and skateboard executive based on Huntington Beach, CA. (This interview was compiled from two chats...

SO, that leads to the answer. I think I am drawn to anything that is interesting to me, mostly people and how they present themselves and act. I trust my eye and sensibilities as I walk around to guide me. I probably err on the side of being a tad cynical. I like shooting people most. I think that is the hardest kind of photo to take, so I enjoy the rush of getting close and seeing and and trying to compose and capture a little slice of reality that can transcend the moment and tell a story on its own. Although I'm sure many of mine do not succeed on that level, and of course they are open to varying interpretations, that's the idea.

Matt Stuart: Into The Fire

Matt Stuart's book Into The Fire was recently published by Setanta Books.  • BA: How did you discover Slab City? MS: I discovered Slab City...

Q&A: Rosem Morton, photographer and nurse on the front lines of the pandemic

Rosem Morton, a nurse for eight years, works full-time at a Baltimore hospital. When she isn’t assisting airway surgeries and distributing personal protective equipment to coworkers, she works as a freelance photojournalist and documentary photographer

ROSEM MORTON, a nurse for eight years, works full-time at a Baltimore hospital. When she isn’t assisting airway surgeries and distributing personal protective equipment to coworkers, she works as a freelance photojournalist and documentary photographer, focusing on health care, trauma, and resilience. Since the onset of the pandemic, much of her work concerns COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.