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How Google and Facebook Are Slowly Strangling Their Digital Offspring | Vanity Fair

The conventional wisdom used to be that digital natives were the only journalism businesses that would thrive. But big layoffs at BuzzFeed and HuffPost show that the Web’s dominant companies can’t be trusted to build a news business on.

The digital winter turns apocalyptic – Columbia Journalism Review

THIS WEEK, AS A LONG-PREDICTED collapse seemed to hit digital media, we saw a few of the tried-and-true ways managers use to explain to employees why they’re  laying them off.

The digital winter turns apocalyptic – Columbia Journalism Review

THIS WEEK, AS A LONG-PREDICTED collapse seemed to hit digital media, we saw a few of the tried-and-true ways managers use to explain to employees why they’re  laying them off.

With Foreign Bureaus Slashed, Freelancers are Filling the Void – At Their Own Risk

Since then, freelancers have increasingly filled the void. These include both Western journalists working in conflict zones around the world, as well as local journalists working in their own non-Western countries.

The Fresno Bee and the War on Local News | GQ

Local newspapers like The Fresno Bee have long been an endangered institution in America, and that was before California Rep. Devin Nunes began waging a public campaign against his hometown paper. Zach Baron spent time with the reporters fighting to keep news alive in an age when the forces they cover are working equally hard to destroy them.

Meet Jonathan Albright, The Digital Sleuth Exposing Fake News | WIRED

Buried in media scholar Jonathan Albright’s research was proof of a massive political misinformation campaign. Now he’s taking on the the world’s biggest platforms before it’s too late.

What the 2018 Pulitzers tell us about the state of American journalism | Poynter

The 14 Pulitzer prizes for American journalism can be a form of tea leaves for the state of the industry. The winners and finalists offer a highly imperfect view of who’s doing notable work. It is often said that you have to be both good and lucky to win one of the prizes. Here are a few observations:

What the 2018 Pulitzers tell us about the state of American journalism | Poynter

The 14 Pulitzer prizes for American journalism can be a form of tea leaves for the state of the industry. The winners and finalists offer a highly imperfect view of who’s doing notable work. It is often said that you have to be both good and lucky to win one of the prizes. Here are a few observations:

For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here’s What I Learned. – The New York Times

This has been my life for nearly two months. In January, after the breaking-newsiest year in recent memory, I decided to travel back in time. I turned off my digital news notifications, unplugged from Twitter and other social networks, and subscribed to home delivery of three print newspapers — The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and my local paper, The San Francisco Chronicle — plus a weekly newsmagazine, The Economist.

As Conservatives Gather, Anger at the News Media Runs Deep – The New York Times

This annual gathering is usually a moment to hammer out what divides the fractious conservative movement. What it has revealed so far is what unites it: contempt for “#fakenews” and the journalists that the former Breitbart News writer Ben Shapiro memorably described as “advocates of leftism, masquerading as objective truth-tellers.”

How Facebook Is Killing Comedy – Splitsider

Facebook is essentially running a payola scam where you have to pay them if you want your own fans to see your content. If you run a large publishing company and you make a big piece of content that you feel proud of, you put it up on Facebook. From there, their algorithm takes over, with no transparency. So, not only is the website not getting ad revenue they used to get, they have to pay Facebook to push it out to their own subscribers. So, Facebook gets the ad revenue from the eyeballs on the thing they are seeing, and they get revenue from the publisher. It’s like if The New York Times had their own subscriber base, but you had to pay the paperboy for every article you wanted to see.

Tackling the Internet’s Central Villain: The Advertising Business – The New York Times

But the online ad machine is also a vast, opaque and dizzyingly complex contraption with underappreciated capacity for misuse — one that collects and constantly profiles data about our behavior, creates incentives to monetize our most private desires, and frequently unleashes loopholes that the shadiest of people are only too happy to exploit.

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