Journalism

What the 2018 Pulitzers tell us about the state of American journalism | Poynter

The 14 Pulitzer prizes for American journalism can be a form of tea leaves for the state of the industry. The winners and finalists offer a highly imperfect view of who’s doing notable work. It is often said that you have to be both good and lucky to win one of the prizes. Here are a few observations:

What the 2018 Pulitzers tell us about the state of American journalism | Poynter

The 14 Pulitzer prizes for American journalism can be a form of tea leaves for the state of the industry. The winners and finalists offer a highly imperfect view of who’s doing notable work. It is often said that you have to be both good and lucky to win one of the prizes. Here are a few observations:

For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here’s What I Learned. – The New York Times

This has been my life for nearly two months. In January, after the breaking-newsiest year in recent memory, I decided to travel back in time. I turned off my digital news notifications, unplugged from Twitter and other social networks, and subscribed to home delivery of three print newspapers — The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and my local paper, The San Francisco Chronicle — plus a weekly newsmagazine, The Economist.

As Conservatives Gather, Anger at the News Media Runs Deep – The New York Times

This annual gathering is usually a moment to hammer out what divides the fractious conservative movement. What it has revealed so far is what unites it: contempt for “#fakenews” and the journalists that the former Breitbart News writer Ben Shapiro memorably described as “advocates of leftism, masquerading as objective truth-tellers.”

How Facebook Is Killing Comedy – Splitsider

Facebook is essentially running a payola scam where you have to pay them if you want your own fans to see your content. If you run a large publishing company and you make a big piece of content that you feel proud of, you put it up on Facebook. From there, their algorithm takes over, with no transparency. So, not only is the website not getting ad revenue they used to get, they have to pay Facebook to push it out to their own subscribers. So, Facebook gets the ad revenue from the eyeballs on the thing they are seeing, and they get revenue from the publisher. It’s like if The New York Times had their own subscriber base, but you had to pay the paperboy for every article you wanted to see.

Tackling the Internet’s Central Villain: The Advertising Business – The New York Times

But the online ad machine is also a vast, opaque and dizzyingly complex contraption with underappreciated capacity for misuse — one that collects and constantly profiles data about our behavior, creates incentives to monetize our most private desires, and frequently unleashes loopholes that the shadiest of people are only too happy to exploit.

HuffPost, Breaking From Its Roots, Ends Unpaid Contributions – The New York Times

The decision was rooted as much in a move to declutter the site as in Ms. Polgreen’s desire to focus on quality reporting and minimize unvetted stories at a time when there is so much misinformation online.

Media Organizations Grapple With the New Facebook – The New York Times

Over the next few months, with the implementation of a revised strategy, Facebook’s two billion users will see less content produced by news organizations and more from their friends, if all goes according to the company’s plan. So what does that mean for the media companies that have come to depend on the social media giant to drive readers to the articles and videos they create?

Not fake news, just plain wrong: Top media corrections of 2017 | Poynter

Two things can be true at the same time. Journalists screw up — often. And we have a responsibility to do better. At the same time, quality journalism is geared towards reaching the truth. We cross-check sources. We fact-check claims. We correct our mistakes, as the vast collection of examples below shows. Few other professions are as wedded to corrections as ours is. As a former fact-checker, I can count on the fingers of one hand the number of times a politician publicly corrected a false claim.

European Press Agencies to Google, Facebook: Pay Up | PDNPulse

Nine European press agencies on Wednesday published an op-ed in Le Monde arguing that Google and Facebook should be required to pay copyright royalties on the third-party news and information they distribute and profit from. The article was published as the European Parliament is debating new legislation that would, according to Agence France-Presse, “make Facebook, Google, Twitter and other major players pay for the millions of news articles they use or link to.” The arguments laid out in the statement should have photojournalists, editorial photographers and anyone who cares about the fate of media organizations in the digital age, nodding in unison.

www.theverge.com

Former Facebook exec says social media is ripping apart society – The Verge

Another former Facebook executive has spoken out about the harm the social network is doing to civil society around the world. Chamath Palihapitiya, who joined Facebook in 2007 and became its vice president for user growth, said he feels “tremendous guilt” about the company he helped make. “I think we have created tools that are ripping apart the social fabric of how society works,” he told an audience at Stanford Graduate School of Business, before recommending people take a “hard break” from social media.

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