New Yorker Photography in a Year of Crisis

Photographers for the magazine in 2020 located surprising forms of artistry within the pandemic’s constraints.

Among the many extraordinary challenges posed by 2020 were a few that were peculiar to photographers. When the pandemic hit, journalists who write for a living could conduct much of their reporting remotely, by phone or over Zoom, but photographers documenting the ravages of covid-19 had to go to the action—or at least within six feet of it. Philip Montgomery was the first photographer to venture out on assignment for The New Yorker when the virus overtook New York City in March. Donning an N95 mask and food-service gloves, he caught scenes of the city just as it was shuddering to a halt: customers eating a final meal in restaurants about to close their doors; anxious shoppers pushing carts past barren grocery shelves; eerily empty subway cars and airport halls; health-care workers in hazmat suits. At the time, such images looked brand-new, like dispatches from an alien world. Even the careful spacing-out of pedestrians on the city’s normally busy streets was a visual shock, an arrangement that, as Adam Gopnik wrote in an essay accompanying the images, seemed to “contradict the very concept of the city.”
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New Guide! The Photographer’s Outlook on 2021 - PhotoShelter Blog

In 2020, the photography industry was plagued with widespread job cancellations due to COVID-19, plus trips and workshops postponed courtesy of travel bans. But despite all of the challenges and unknowns, you adapted.  We recently asked more than a thousa

Today, we’re thrilled to share The Photographer’s Outlook on 2021. Download your free guide now to see how photographers remained imaginative and adaptable despite an arduous year, including firsthand accounts of what worked and what didn’t, advice on where to focus your efforts and more.
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Cameras and Lenses – Bartosz Ciechanowski

Over the course of this article we’ll build a simple camera from first principles. Our first steps will be very modest – we’ll simply try to take any picture. To do that we need to have a sensor capable of detecting and measuring light that shines onto it.
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Dafna Talmor, László Moholy-Nagy & Josh Kern- The Photographic Notebook

"For artists who do stage their work and find it in situ, the photographic sketchbook is virtually unnecessary as a pre-game facilitator. I would suggest though, that the photographic notebook is an indispensable tool after cheap prints have been made ava

“For artists who do stage their work and find it in situ, the photographic sketchbook is virtually unnecessary as a pre-game facilitator. I would suggest though, that the photographic notebook is an indispensable tool after cheap prints have been made available”
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Blind – Picto and Magnum Photos: 70 Years of Correspondences

Magnum Photos’ Gilles Peress in a conversation with Raymond Depardon offered an interpretation of this evolution of the print through history that could be applied to many other Magnum photographers: “When you look at Henri’s prints all through the years, you see an evolution between these “blond” prints of the fifties and the prints as of the years 1968-1970. As of that period, the prints have higher contrasts with another interpretation of light, and the question is, to know whether he [Henri-Cartier Bresson] is the one responsible, or if the times are. I think that in the fifties there was an interpretation of light and rendition that fulfilled another function, that of creating a certain harmony, a peace after the war, but that with the mounting of [societal] contradictions in the sixties, the tonality of prints not only of Henri’s, but of others too- undergoes a radical change.”
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WATCH: Essdras M. Suarez Reviews Your Photo Submissions - PhotoShelter Blog

Two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Essdras M. Suarez reviews 30 anonymous photos and shares compositional tips in this free PhotoShelter webinar.

Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Essdras M. Suarez knows a thing or two about the power of a strong portfolio. For years, he has helped fellow photographers improve their work through in-person lessons and online portfolio reviews.

15 Photographers on How Imagination Shapes Their Work

Dawoud Bey, Nan Goldin, KangHee Kim and more reflect on the photograph's potential to influence social and artistic images.

From the Magnum Square Print Sale in Partnership with Aperture, Dawoud Bey, Nan Goldin, KangHee Kim and more reflect on the photograph's potential to influence social and artistic images.

How to Add Words to Pictures

How do you go tackle writing about your photographs? This question poses possibly the most vexing challenge for most photographers. I keep coming back to it because I write about other people’s pictures, and I listen to or read what photographers say or write about their own work. In some ways, the preceding is going to be a variant of older pieces (you can find them here and here). However, now I feel that I have more clarity about the subject than before.
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The Return of Live Sports: Celebrating the Women Who Capture the Moment - PhotoShelter Blog

Find out which women in sports photography inspire PhotoShelter members Sarah Sachs, Jennifer Stewart, Abbie Parr and Casey Brooke.

As live sports begin to make a comeback, we want to take this opportunity to talk about representation, and to highlight some incredible women in sports photography. These women are creating stunning images and leading the way for other aspiring photographers in the field (and on the field).

The Photographer Peeking at Your Phone

Jeff Mermelstein’s photo collection “#nyc” captures the quotidian dramas taking place on the phone screens of unsuspecting strangers.

In October of 2017, the photographer Jeff Mermelstein, who has been taking pictures of New York City street life since the early nineteen-eighties, was walking in midtown, on one of his near-daily shooting expeditions, when he encountered something he had never thought to capture before. “It was somewhere around Eighth Avenue and the mid-Forties,” Mermelstein told me from his home in Brooklyn, when I called him the other day. “I noticed that a woman was sitting there, tapping something out on her phone.” Operating on half-conscious instinct, as he often does when photographing, Mermelstein raised his own phone, went up to the woman, and took a picture, focussing not on her, as he might usually have done, but on the screen of her device. “She was doing a Google search, and it was something about wills, and a line came up about finding six thousand dollars in an attic. It was just a couple of lines there, but I suddenly felt, This could be the germ of a short story. It was a galvanizing moment.”
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