Photojournalism

Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up 16 November 2018 – Photojournalism Now

This week on Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – it’s all about the Museum of Contemporary Art (Sydney) with my reviews on the David Goldblatt retrospective and Primavera 2018.

This is a Photographer Covering the Wildfires in California

As dry and windy conditions cause raging wildfires in California, there are brave men and women putting themselves in harm’s way to document what’s happening and serve as the eyes of the world. This incredible photo by photographer Noah Berger shows photographer Justin Sullivan braving wind-blown embers while covering the devastating Camp Fire in Paradise, California.

pdnpulse.pdnonline.com pdnpulse.pdnonline.com

Visual Tropes of Migration Tell Predictable but Misleading Stories

When mainstream news agencies report on Central American migration, they frequently use a series of visual tropes to turn complex issues into predictable narratives. Editors often select formulaic photographs from subscription news agencies to illustrate stories. Many of these borrow from religious iconography or draw on stereotypes to portray the displaced.
The images shape readers’ understanding of stories, often without their awareness. In my research into representations of 21st-century global migration, I have identified a series of recurring tropes.

Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – 2 November 2018 – Photojournalism Now

This week on Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – the 9th edition of the Carmignac Photojournalism Award “Arctic: New Frontier” by Yuri Kozyrev and Kadir van Lohuizen (NOOR) and Open Society Foundation’s Moving Walls 25  – Another Way Home.

pdnpulse.pdnonline.com pdnpulse.pdnonline.com

The Village Voice’s Photographers Captured Change, Turmoil Unfolding on New York City’s Streets

Just as the photographs of Lewis Hine and Jacob Riis communicated the horrors of child labor and tenement overcrowding in the early 20th century, Voice photojournalists such as Donna Binder, Ricky Flores, Lisa Kahane, T.L. Litt, Thomas McGovern, Brian Palmer, Joseph Rodriguez, and Linda Rosier conveyed the fears, rage and struggles of the city’s marginalized communities.

Taking the leap: Why I’m leaving TV news after 24 years | Poynter

I’ve been contemplating this decision for a long time now, ever since my shoulder issues in January 2017 which put me off work for four months.

It’s part of why we’ve been living vagabond for the last year, not wanting to settle in case I made the jump. I tell ya … pulling the trigger has been the hardest decision I’ve ever had to make. But I’m making it.

I’m moving on from my career as a photojournalist for NBC LA.

When your kid is in the school: Shooting made me rethink decades of photojournalism | Poynter

By the time the Aurora theater and Arapaho High School shootings struck my city of Denver, I no longer accepted assignments to cover mass murder. A churn in my stomach stopped me from saying yes again.

Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – 12 October 2018 – Photojournalism Now

This week on Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – the third edition of Photo Kathmandu, Everyday Climate Change and an exhibition on Cuba by Melbourne artist Helga Leunig.

Why David Butow’s Image of Jeff Flake Stands Out – PhotoShelter Blog

Both position and timing matter in capturing a compelling and visually descriptive photo. Last week’s explosive SCOTUS confirmation hearing of Brett Kavanaugh provided another interesting opportunity to explore this concept as a small group of photographers trained their cameras on the Senate Judiciary Committee members before the key vote on a motion to proceed to the full Senate.

Kavanaugh hearing highlights the power of photo editors – Columbia Journalism Review

THE FRONT PAGE OF FRIDAY’S NEW YORK TIMES is dominated by two impressive photos: Brett Kavanaugh, the nominee to the Supreme Court, on the right, and Christine Blasey Ford, who accused Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her in high school, on the left. The images are technically beautiful, and striking in their contrast.

Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – 28 September 2018 – Photojournalism Now

This week on Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – Anthropocene, an expansive and immersive multimedia exhibition opens in Canada featuring the work of Edward Burtynsky (above), plus Getty Reportage Grant winners 2018.

Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – 21 September 2018 – Photojournalism Now

This week on Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up Chinese-born, Perth-based photo artist Tami Xiang’s new work Peasantography: Family Portrait and American photojournalist Chuck Fishman’s Re-Generation: Jewish Life in Poland.

Voices of African Photography: Dancing with Casablanca’s light – The Washington Post

Voices of African Photography is a 10-part series presented in partnership with the African Photojournalism Database, a joint project of Everyday Africa and World Press Photo, to highlight the work of 10 African photographers and photojournalists.

Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – 14 September 2018 – Photojournalism Now

This week on Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up the spotlight is on New York. If you’re looking for a nostalgic view of Greenwich Village check out Village Voice staff photographer Fred W. McDarrah: New York Scenes at Steven Kasher. In keeping with historical tropes is The New Beginning for Italian Photography: 1945-1965 at Howard Greenberg. And for a contemporary view of photography, the seventh edition of Photoville kicks off in Brooklyn.

What Is Missing From Photography | PDNPulse

It has been bugging me for a while now, there is just something that is missing from photography. From my personal work to the majority of photographers out there. I’m talking about the photos on your feeds, be it personal to commercial. It has been bugging me and I finally found out what it is, what is missing from photography, is stories.

How We Came to Know His Fall – Witness

That is, until an image came in from Richard Drew, a photographer for the Associated Press. A man in a simple white shirt and black pant ensemble, with one leg bent, in the upper third. His frame symmetrically dividing the North and South tower. He was falling, arms by his side, seemingly resigned to his fate. And in that moment, Margaret O’Connor was both a sifter and potential victim of casualty.

Celebrating 30 years of photojournalism at Visa pour l’Image – The Washington Post

Beyond the exhibitions and screenings, where hundreds of thousands of visitors can discover or rediscover some of the best of photojournalism produced around the world, Visa pour l’Image, the annual photography festival held in Perpignan, France, is also a meeting place.

Categories