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Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – 22 March, 2018 – Photojournalism Now

This week on Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – Format Festival in the UK and the Australian and New Zealand Photobook Award. Plus check out my review for Australian Book Review of a new academic text, Visualising Human Rights. Next week there won’t be a blog post as I’m taking the weekend off for a family wedding!

Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – 22 March, 2018 – Photojournalism Now

This week on Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – Format Festival in the UK and the Australian and New Zealand Photobook Award. Plus check out my review for Australian Book Review of a new academic text, Visualising Human Rights. Next week there won’t be a blog post as I’m taking the weekend off for a family wedding!

The Grieving Woman at the Ethiopian Airlines Crash Site, and the Western Gaze – Reading The Pictures

This astonishing photo from the Ethiopian Airlines crash site hits me two ways. The expression of grief is so intense, I cannot forget it, all the way down to the tension in this woman’s cheek, jaw, and neck, and the dirt that misses her face and seems permanently suspended. At the same, however, I feel challenged looking at the photo as a westerner.

The NPPA Confronts Issues of Diversity and Inclusion within Photojournalism – PhotoShelter Blog

Diversity, inclusion and representation have become increasingly salient topics as many organizations – from government to restaurants – grapple with a generational shift that is forcing a re-examination of institutional bias, racism, sexual harassment and assault, misogyny and more. After many years of “open secrets” in the photojournalism industry, a scathing report from the Columbia Journalism Review revealed how pervasive and insidious the issues are within the industry.

Beautiful Deaths – Witness

These are Goya’s Disasters of War, a series of 82 prints made between 1810 and 1820 that show the horrors of war and its aftermath during the Spanish Napoleonic Wars. They are etchings, not photographs, but they are complete in their depiction of atrocity; there is death, mutilation, torture, execution, rape, pillage, starvation, sorrow, disgust and despair in unflinching detail. They show the effect of war on the civilian population and, in his etchings of the aftermath of the war and the restoration of a flawed monarchy and church, the ways in which suffering, corruption and war are linked to wider structures of power.

Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up 22 February 2019 – Photojournalism Now

This week on Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – the MiamiPhotoFest opens next week with 16 exhibitions including works by Kerry Payne Stailey and Maggie Steber. Plus the 2019 winner of the FotoEvidence World Press Photo Book Award Patrick Brown.

The Legacy of Photos – Witness

Mario Cruz (Instagram) is a 31-year-old photographer based in Lisbon, Portugal. Starting in 2006, he worked with LUSA, a Portuguese news agency, and European Pressphoto Agency, before starting to work on his own personal projects more fully in 2012. “The talibes project appeared naturally,” he remembers:

Women of Color Organize for Access and Accountability in Photojournalism – The New York Times

Tara Pixley often felt isolated in the newsrooms where she worked as a photographer or photo editor. As a “black woman who was the child of immigrants, raised by a single mom, and also a first-generation college student,” she struggled for a decade to fit in. She was the only woman of color in the photo departments where she worked and was ignored or treated dismissively.

Gaia Tripoli on Editing Sergey Ponomarev’s Photos for a New York Times Feature | PDNPulse

In our story about how Sergey Ponomarev documented the arctic village of Shoyna being swallowed by sand, we mention New York Times photo editor Gaia Tripoli’s role in assigning and editing the story.
Here, Tripoli explains in detail how she edited and sequenced Ponomarev’s take, which included Polaroids, images of the landscape and village life, and videos.

SF Chronicle Doubles A1 Photos Shot by Women Photographers | PDNPulse

According to data compiled by the organization Women Photograph, San Francisco Chronicle was far and away the leader among major newspapers in publishing A1 lead photographs shot by women in 2018. Forty-one percent of the Chronicle’s A1 images were shot by women, which nearly doubled their 2017 mark of 23.4 percent. According to Women Photograph, which promotes women journalists, other publications showed slight increases in 2018, but most continued the practice of publishing A1 images made by men more than 80 percent of the time; for several publications that number was more than 90 percent. At 26 percent, The Washington Post had the second-highest percentage of A1 lead images by women. Just 5.4 percent of The Wall Street Journal‘s lead images were by women, according to the Women Photograph data.

Quick Tip: Darcy Padilla on How to Make Better Photographs | PDNPulse

Darcy Padilla: We can walk into a room, we see things, we know in this one setting what we’re going to do. [Reed was saying] to think of all the possibilities, and how that [eventually] takes you to these things that you don’t know.

Slow Violence, Slow Photography: Chris Gregory’s Portrait of Puerto Rico after Maria – Reading The Pictures

How do you photograph systemic failure? How do you photograph the long tail of the United States’ brutal, gradual, incompetent betrayal of Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria? Christopher Gregory does it through juxtaposition. He moves from portraits to infrastructure and back again. He pairs photographs in diptychs that simultaneously jar and gel. He pictures Puerto Rico one year after Hurricane Maria but makes the hurricane seems like yesterday.

Of the Trillion Photos Taken in 2018, Which Were the Most Memorable?

But that age has come to an end: Digital journalism and social media have changed the way we consume images. Each day, audiences are bombarded with photos. Many are shocking, inspiring and heartbreaking. But in their overwhelming volume, they’re easily forgotten.

The State of Photojournalism Today – Interview with MaryAnne Golon by Cat Lachowskyj | LensCulture

The Washington Post’s Director of Photography offers her insights into why photojournalism will always prevail, despite our persistent doubts.

13 Stories That Captured Photography in 2018 – The New York Times

Because photography touches most everything, our topics have been far-ranging — from the environment, cyberbullying and immigration to race, gender and class. We have written about famed photographers like Dorothea Lange, Gordon Parks and Diane Arbus as well as emerging image makers like Citlali Fabián, Fethi Sahraoui, Daniel Edwards and Mengwen Cao. And we have written about the need for more diverse storytellers to help us better understand the world we live in.

Shocker: News Photography Gets Worse Without Actual News Photographers | Fstoppers

Researchers Tara Mortensen and Peter Gade, in a study published in Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, analyzed photographs from the Middletown (N.Y.) Times Herald-Record pre- and post-layoff of the photo staff in 2013. From this set of photographs, 488 were identified as taken by a professional and 409 were not. These photos were then classified on a scale devised by Ken Kobré, a professor who wrote the seminal photojournalism text, “Photojournalism: The Professionals’ Approach.” The scale rated photos as informational, graphically appealing, emotionally appealing, and intimate.

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