María Daniel Balcázar – Kilombo

  KILOMBO María Daniel Balcázar     Kilombo is a tribute to the resilience and vitality of the African legacy in Brazil. During the Atlantic slave trade, approximately 4.8 million pe…

This work took place in the states of Bahia, Rio de Janeiro, Minas Gerais, and São Paolo, from 2015 to 2018 in rural quilombos and urban favelas, in the welcoming homes, and places of work and of worship of Afro-Brazilians. They are still struggling against poverty, racism and violence and for the recognition of their rights, including the rights to the lands they have inhabited since their founding as rebel quilombos. From there, the African heritage has intertwined with Indigenous and Christian-European cultures, creating the richly multicultural XXI Century Brazil.

Politics of the Kitchen: Counter Histories - LENSCRATCH

By Barbara Ciurej and Lindsay Lochman Counter Histories: Documenting the Struggle to Desegregate Southern Restaurants is a timely resource bringing together photojournalism, history and politics with food. Connecting desegregation protests and demonstrati

Counter Histories: Documenting the Struggle to Desegregate Southern Restaurants is a timely resource bringing together photojournalism, history and politics with food. Connecting desegregation protests and demonstrations of today and yesterday, Counter Histories provides viewers a context to consider the role of civil disobedience in the face of systemic racism and injustice.

The Timeless Pleasures of Dawoud Bey’s Street Portraits

His pictures make me think about the times I’ve walked down the street feeling invisible, until I pass another Black person who holds my gaze long enough for us to exchange a nod.

few years ago, while on a road-trip assignment with the photographer Andre Wagner, I began to needle him with questions about street photography. I wanted to know about the emotional mechanics and structure of it: what a photographer’s eye picks up, what makes a stranger agree to a moment of intimacy with someone she may never see again. Andre told me that it primarily entailed getting people to trust you within a short window of time. But there was another secret, too. Andre loved photographing Black people. They were familiar to him, as he was to them. He could read their cues, and sense their excitement. And so many of the Black people he encountered were eager to have their photos taken, just one adjustment away from being camera-ready.

30 Over 50/In Context at the Center of Fine Art Photography - LENSCRATCH

 Toni Lovejoy, Winner of the In Context Award A new exhibition recently opened online at the Center of Fine Art Photography that celebrates artists over the age of 50, with an eye on wisdom and history accrued over decades of living. Titled 30 Over 50 /In

A new exhibition recently opened online at the Center of Fine Art Photography that celebrates artists over the age of 50, with an eye on wisdom and history accrued over decades of living. Titled 30 Over 50 /In Context, the exhibition was jurored by gallerist Arnika Dawkins. Complete projects and bios are on the C4FAP site. There is a curator and artist talk with Arnika Dawkins and the award-winning artists on April 14th at 5 pm mountain time via zoom. Please join them by signing up HERE.

A Cyclist on the English Landscape

Grounded by the pandemic, a travel photographer spent the year pedaling the roads around his home, resulting in a series of poetic self-portraits.

At the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, with travel restrictions in place worldwide, we launched a new series — The World Through a Lens — in which photojournalists help transport you, virtually, to some of our planet’s most beautiful and intriguing places. This week, Roff Smith shares a collection of images from around his home in southeast England.

Tim Huynh: Fill the Frame - LENSCRATCH

The feature length documentary FILL THE FRAME by Tim Huynh puts the viewer into the shoes of the street photographer in a cinematic, visceral way. It immediately demonstrates the boldness required of street photographers to step in front of their subjects

Why Jamel Shabazz Is New York’s Most Vital Street Photographer

Since the early 1980s, Shabazz has captured the energy of street life and hip-hop culture in New York, making indelible images of joy, style, and community.

New York is a ghost town. The COVID-19 pandemic has brought the metropolis to a standstill. Many are scared to even leave their apartments to buy groceries. The globe-trotting photographer Jamel Shabazz is tucked away in his Long Island home, his “sanctuary.” Shabazz’s world is rocked daily by yet another phone call announcing the death of a loved one. It is a calendar of loss with which he is intimately familiar. He survived the 1980s crack era and the AIDS crisis, when so many friends from his Brooklyn neighborhoods—Red Hook and then East Flatbush—did not.

Suffering and Hope in the Streets of São Paulo's 'Crackland' - Feature Shoot

Every morning, José Carlos leaves home at 5:00 AM and takes several buses into the heart of São Paulo to deliver bread and juice to the people living on the…

The bread shepherd was one of the first people to introduce the photojournalist Luca Meola to the community three years ago, when he started documenting life in Cracolândia. And in some ways, his story has become emblematic of a larger truth that the photographer has come to understand about the area. It’s a place touched by acute suffering, hardship, and heartbreak–Meola describes it as an “open wound” at the core of the city–but if you stick around long enough, you might find moments of resilience, hope, and unconditional kindness.