Category: Portfolios & Galleries

Facing Fire: Art, Wildfire, and the End of Nature in the New West | LENSCRATCH

Natural disasters are ever increasing with climate change, and in California, we have been bracing ourselves for The Big One for decades. We are kept alert by tremors and shakers that seem to state,"Don't get too comfortable", but another disaster, insidi

Bruno Mouron & Pascal Rostain : Paparazzi

YellowKorner presents the exhibition “PAPARAZZI” with the photographs by Bruno Mouron and Pascal Rostain, magnifying the garbage of celebrities. This exhibition is to be discovered in the 100 galleries of YellowKorner around the world as well as at La Hune, the historic bookshop- gallery of Saint-Germain-des-Prés in Paris, for an event exhibition. Bruno Mouron and Pascal Rostain succeeded in renewing “Paparazism” with genius.

Link:
https://loeildelaphotographie.com/en/bruno-mouron-pascal-rostain-paparazzi-pp/

Michael Wolf : Life in Cities

The Robert Koch Gallery presents Michael Wolf: Life in Cities, a survey celebrating Michael Wolf’s life and work. For over four decades Wolf examined the layered urban landscape, addressing juxtapositions of public and private space, and anonymity and individuality in relation to history and modern development. Michael Wolf’s work on life in cities was always driven by a profound concern for the people living in these environments and for the consequences of massive urbanization on contemporary civilization. This commitment and engagement remained central throughout his career. The Robert Koch Gallery was the first gallery to represent Michael Wolf, and did so exclusively for many years, presenting Wolf’s first exhibition of his breakthrough project Architecture of Density in 2005 and later the first gallery exhibition of Transparent City in 2008. The gallery has mounted many ground-breaking exhibitions of Michael Wolf’s work prior to his untimely passing in 2019.

Link:
https://loeildelaphotographie.com/en/michael-wolf-life-in-cities-2-pp/

Michael Ashkin | 1000 Words

n the desert, the traces of human presence are visible on the ground for a long time. Alongside the remains of earlier inhabitants are other, more recent legacies –– accidental landscapes of exhausted ground, tracked and paved over, sown with garbage, shattered and heaped up. Created by obscure acts of violence, places such as these seem to exist below the horizon of sense, their dialect both familiar and unreadable.

Link:
http://www.1000wordsmag.com/michael-ashkin/