War

Egypt: Legacy of Rabaa Massacre 5 Years Later | Time

In the early hours of Aug. 14, I was trying to make my way into Rabaa Square with my camera, unaware of the violence I was about to witness. The sun had just become visible on the horizon when a block of armored military vehicles jammed the square — one of Cairo’s busiest thoroughfares — shutting down all major exits to the sit-in. Police and military soldiers advanced to clear the sit-in using live ammunition, armored vehicles and snipers. Around 800 people were killed in fewer than 12 hours. A huge fire engulfed the sit-in, burning down tents and the nearby Rabaa al-Adawiya Mosque.

Looking at the war in Syria through a Syrian photographer’s eyes – The Washington Post

For most of the war, journalists have had trouble getting into the country because of the dangers. Many have been kidnapped and killed. And, of course, Syrian journalists have been working under extraordinarily dangerous conditions. Photojournalist Hosam Katan is one of those Syrian journalists, and his new book, “Yalla Habibi: Living with War in Aleppo’” (Kehrer Verlag, 2018), takes us into the conflict that has been ravaging his country for nearly a decade.

I Could Have Been One of the Journalists Killed in Kabul – The New York Times

On April 30, I read the first tweets about the initial bombing in downtown Kabul as I was going to bed. In Ottawa, the place I have called home for the past four years, news of an attack in Afghanistan always triggers a flurry of text messages to my mother. She assured me that everyone in my family was fine. I woke up an hour later to her texting me about a second blast. A suicide bomber, carrying a camera to blend in, had detonated explosives that killed 25 people, including nine journalists. She wanted to know if I knew any of them. I did.

I Walked Into Iraq – Vantage – Medium

Fifteen years ago, at the start of the war on Iraq, I left Turkey and walked for four nights through monsoon-like rains into Iraq. I was on assignment for Time. I didn’t tell this story for ten years.

Sketching Cruelty and Finding Humanity Beside Syria’s ‘Waterfall of Blood’ – The New York Times

A conversation with Rania Abouzeid, author of “No Turning Back: Life, Loss, and Hope in Wartime Syria” (W.W. Norton & Company, 2018)

War of Words: Meet the Texan Trolling for Putin – Texas Monthly

In 2014, Russell Bonner Bentley was a middle-aged arborist living in Austin. Now he’s a local celebrity in a war-torn region of Ukraine—and a foot soldier in Russia’s information war.

The Siege of Eastern Ghouta and Seven Years of War in Syria – The Atlantic

More than a thousand people are believed to have been killed in recent weeks as Syrian government forces laid siege to the rebel-controlled region of eastern Ghouta outside the capital of Damascus. The United Nations estimates that 400,000 people still live in the villages and towns in the besieged region, trapped by several rebel groups who won’t let them leave and by Syrian government blockades that block their paths. Despite international pressure to call a ceasefire, Syrian ground forces and Russian-backed air forces have maintained their assault, recently gaining territory and splitting the region into three parts. This battle is just one of many still taking place across the fractured nation of Syria seven years since the start of its civil war.

A New Documentary Honors the Work and Life of Photojournalist Chris Hondros – The Atlantic

Conflict photographer Chris Hondros, working for Getty Images,  covered major events from the attacks of September 11 through the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the civil war in Liberia, and the chaos of the Arab Spring in Egypt and Libya. Hondros was killed while on assignment in Libya in 2011 in an attack that also took the life of photojournalist Tim Hetherington. The attack took place while they were covering the armed uprising against the government of Muammar Qaddafi. Released over the weekend and available today online is a new documentary film titled Hondros, directed by Chris’s friend Greg Campbell, and executive produced by Jake Gyllenhaal and Jamie Lee Curtis. The powerful photographs that Hondros made speak volumes about our era, and many belong in history books. The relationships that Hondros made throughout his lifetime speak even louder, leaving an amazing legacy that—along with his images—is examined in this film. Below, a handful of photos by and of Chris Hondros, who risked and then tragically lost his life to show the world the reality of warfare.

Sara Terry and Teun Van Der HEIJDEN: WAR IS ONLY HALF THE STORY, TEN YEARS OF THE AFTERMATH PROJECT | LENSCRATCH

The amazing Sara Terry has been a guiding light and incredible supporter of compelling visual story telling over the years, reminding us that the effects of war are long reaching and devastating. In 2006, she created  The Aftermath Project,  a non-profit organization “committed to telling the other half of the story of conflict — the story of what it takes for individuals to learn to live again, to rebuild destroyed lives and homes, to restore civil societies, to address the lingering wounds of war while struggling to create new avenues for peace”.

Photographers edit photographers: The late Stanley Greene called Yuri Kozyrev’s war photography ‘lyricism in darkness’ – The Washington Post

In the final installment of our series featuring the Noor agency photographers editing one another, we show 10 images by the renowned Russian war photographer Yuri Kozyrev chosen by the late Stanley Greene.

A Victory Against ISIS in the Philippines Leaves a City Destroyed – The Atlantic

Five months ago, a group of pro-ISIS militants attacked and took control of parts of the southern Philippine city of Marawi. More than 1,000 people have been killed in the siege that has raged since then, as Philippine government troops waged war against the pro-ISIS occupiers—local terrorist groups called the Maute Group and Abu Sayyaf. Airstrikes and thousands of government troops involved in street battles took an enormous toll on the city as well, damaging or destroying hundreds of houses, mosques, and other buildings. After the deaths of two of the militant leaders, President Rodrigo Duterte declared the fighting over last week, and said that Marawi City had been liberated. Today, some of the 400,000 displaced residents are being allowed to return to parts of their war-ravaged city.

War Photographer Giles Duley Tells the Story of War’s Long-Term Impact

Giles Duley, one of the world’s leading documentary and humanitarian photographers, is working on a new project titled Legacy of War. Learn what he thinks it means to tell a story in this inspiring 7-minute interview as part of Ilford Photo‘s new “Ilford Inspires” video series.

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