War of Words: Meet the Texan Trolling for Putin – Texas Monthly

In 2014, Russell Bonner Bentley was a middle-aged arborist living in Austin. Now he’s a local celebrity in a war-torn region of Ukraine—and a foot soldier in Russia’s information war.

My Lai Massacre Anniversary: The Photographer who Captured an American Atrocity | Getty Images FOTO

EXCLUSIVE: Ron Haeberle talks with FOTO about his pictures from an American atrocity that changed the course of the Vietnam War.

The Siege of Eastern Ghouta and Seven Years of War in Syria – The Atlantic

More than a thousand people are believed to have been killed in recent weeks as Syrian government forces laid siege to the rebel-controlled region of eastern Ghouta outside the capital of Damascus. The United Nations estimates that 400,000 people still live in the villages and towns in the besieged region, trapped by several rebel groups who won’t let them leave and by Syrian government blockades that block their paths. Despite international pressure to call a ceasefire, Syrian ground forces and Russian-backed air forces have maintained their assault, recently gaining territory and splitting the region into three parts. This battle is just one of many still taking place across the fractured nation of Syria seven years since the start of its civil war.

A New Documentary Honors the Work and Life of Photojournalist Chris Hondros – The Atlantic

Conflict photographer Chris Hondros, working for Getty Images,  covered major events from the attacks of September 11 through the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the civil war in Liberia, and the chaos of the Arab Spring in Egypt and Libya. Hondros was killed while on assignment in Libya in 2011 in an attack that also took the life of photojournalist Tim Hetherington. The attack took place while they were covering the armed uprising against the government of Muammar Qaddafi. Released over the weekend and available today online is a new documentary film titled Hondros, directed by Chris’s friend Greg Campbell, and executive produced by Jake Gyllenhaal and Jamie Lee Curtis. The powerful photographs that Hondros made speak volumes about our era, and many belong in history books. The relationships that Hondros made throughout his lifetime speak even louder, leaving an amazing legacy that—along with his images—is examined in this film. Below, a handful of photos by and of Chris Hondros, who risked and then tragically lost his life to show the world the reality of warfare.


The amazing Sara Terry has been a guiding light and incredible supporter of compelling visual story telling over the years, reminding us that the effects of war are long reaching and devastating. In 2006, she created  The Aftermath Project,  a non-profit organization “committed to telling the other half of the story of conflict — the story of what it takes for individuals to learn to live again, to rebuild destroyed lives and homes, to restore civil societies, to address the lingering wounds of war while struggling to create new avenues for peace”.

Using Drones to Shoot War Zones

Photographer and director Joey L has been using camera drones to capture aerial photos and videos in conflict zones. Here’s a 21-minute talk he recently gave on his work at Hardwired NYC.

Photographers edit photographers: The late Stanley Greene called Yuri Kozyrev’s war photography ‘lyricism in darkness’ – The Washington Post

In the final installment of our series featuring the Noor agency photographers editing one another, we show 10 images by the renowned Russian war photographer Yuri Kozyrev chosen by the late Stanley Greene.

A Victory Against ISIS in the Philippines Leaves a City Destroyed – The Atlantic

Five months ago, a group of pro-ISIS militants attacked and took control of parts of the southern Philippine city of Marawi. More than 1,000 people have been killed in the siege that has raged since then, as Philippine government troops waged war against the pro-ISIS occupiers—local terrorist groups called the Maute Group and Abu Sayyaf. Airstrikes and thousands of government troops involved in street battles took an enormous toll on the city as well, damaging or destroying hundreds of houses, mosques, and other buildings. After the deaths of two of the militant leaders, President Rodrigo Duterte declared the fighting over last week, and said that Marawi City had been liberated. Today, some of the 400,000 displaced residents are being allowed to return to parts of their war-ravaged city.

War Photographer Giles Duley Tells the Story of War’s Long-Term Impact

Giles Duley, one of the world’s leading documentary and humanitarian photographers, is working on a new project titled Legacy of War. Learn what he thinks it means to tell a story in this inspiring 7-minute interview as part of Ilford Photo‘s new “Ilford Inspires” video series.

American wars in the photobook – Witness

I want to attempt to come to conclusions about both the way photographers described war and how underlying larger professional and societal trends influenced the description. Needless to say, these two aspects are not independent at all. Photographers are embedded in societies. However much they might try, they can never escape the restrictions put upon them. They might fully embrace them, fight them, or engage in a combination of both. This then feeds back into the societies, which might change their thinking around wars based on what photographs tell them. It’s an imperfect feedback loop, whose imperfections are frequently being discussed by both photographers and society. Both tend to voice their dismay about war imagery not having enough power and/or impact to dissuade the starting of yet another war (by the same society having such conversations).

In Her Own Words, Photographing the Vietnam War – The New York Times

Catherine Leroy was 21 when she arrived in Vietnam in 1966 with only a hundred dollars, a Leica M2 and a limited professional portfolio. Over the next three years covering the war, she built an exceptional body of work: surviving and documenting a capture by the North Vietnamese Army, parachuting in combat operations with the 173rd Airborne, and being published on the covers of major magazines, including Life and Paris Match.

‘I Am Not Useful for My Camera if I Die’: A Syrian Photographer’s View – The New York Times

When a Syrian Army sniper shot Hosam Katan in Aleppo in May 2015, Mr. Katan couldn’t feel where the bullet had hit. He hoped it wasn’t his eye or his thigh. In five years photographing the Syrian conflict, he had seen enough colleagues shot to know which wounds were fatal, and which were not. As he lay bleeding, he realized he might soon join Marie Colvin and James Foley on the list of journalists killed covering Syria’s civil war.

A photographer and a soldier talk about dealing with PTSD from being in war situations – The Washington Post

I wish I could pinpoint a defining moment, or a shutter click that marked the instant when I’d had enough of covering war. But I can’t. Maybe there was one hidden amid the dust and rubble and broken bodies I’d left behind when I walked out of Gaza after the 2014 war there. But rather than a sudden change of heart, my appetite for covering conflict faded gradually, a light waning until there was nothing left to see.

Burned-out buses, unexploded missiles: a photographer on the road through Syria. – The Washington Post

“We wanted to understand who is really ruling the country now, to see if there will be a chance of reconciliation in the close future,” photographer Christian Werner told In Sight. He and reporter Fritz Schaap drove the route in Syria that took them through the three largest cities, Aleppo, Latakia and Homs. In a two-part essay for Der Spiegel, Schapp described part of their route, which Werner’s photos echo. “Burned-out military vehicles and buses line the route while unexploded missiles jut from the brown, barren soil like cactuses.”

No One Would Buy My Photos, So Here They Are For Free: Mosul 2017

My name is Kainoa Little, and I am a Shoreline, Washington-based conflict photographer. I was in Mosul in April and May 2017, documenting Iraqi forces as they fought Islamic State militants to liberate the city.

The Battle for Mosul Enters Its Final Stage – The Atlantic

Eight months ago, thousands of Iraqi and Kurdish troops, supported by the United States, France, Britain, and other western nations, began a massive operation to retake Iraq’s second largest city of Mosul from ISIS militants. Now, after months of war, the Iraqi military says it has reached the final few days of the battle, having encircled an estimated 350 remaining Islamic State militants in Mosul’s Old City . Reuters reports that more than 50,000 civilians remain trapped in the Old City, as ISIS fighters are “dug in among civilians in crumbling houses, making extensive use of booby traps, suicide bombers and sniper fire to slow down the advance of Iraqi troops.” Also, see previous stories on the battle for Mosul here, here, here, and here.

The images Saudi Arabia doesn’t want you to see – CNN.com

But you won’t find the story splashed on front pages and leading news bulletins around the globe — Yemen’s grinding two-and-a-half-year civil conflict, between Houthi militants and a Saudi Arabian-led coalition of Arab states that support the former Hadi government, is often called “the silent war” because it receives relatively little attention in the media.
Yet that’s not for want of trying: for the past two months CNN and dozens of other journalists have been actively pushing to gain access to the hardest-hit parts of the country.

War photographer Alessio Romenzi on covering conflict and managing his fear – LA Times

Photographer Alessio Remenzi has been covering conflict in the Middle East since the Arab Spring and was among the first photographers smuggled into Syria to cover the civil war. Most recently he has been covering the battle for Mosul, Iraq. He was previously interviewed by The Times in 2012. He recently discussed covering the fighting in Iraq.