Photos From America’s Longest War

A visual chronicle of the Afghanistan conflict.

Here, in chronological order, are images showing the long arc of the war, as seen through the eyes of New York Times photographers.
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Industry Insights: Ron Haviv on the changing landscape of conflict photography | 1854 Photography

Reading Time: 5 minutes From cutting through the oversaturated image market to combating fake news, the renowned conflict photographer and Emmy-nominated filmmaker discusses how the role – and risks – of photojournalism continue to shift in the digital ag

From cutting through the oversaturated image market to combating fake news, the renowned conflict photographer and Emmy-nominated filmmaker discusses how the role – and risks – of photojournalism continue to shift in the digital age

‘You Are Not A Soldier’: Watch Clip Of Hot Docs Film About War Photographer André Liohn

EXCLUSIVE: Brazilian production and distribution outfit Elo Company has unveiled a first look at their new documentary feature You Are Not A Soldier, which will have its world premiere at Hot Docs …

Brazilian production and distribution outfit Elo Company has unveiled a first look at their new documentary feature You Are Not A Soldier, which will have its world premiere at Hot Docs this week

Peter van Agtmael Chronicles the Frontlines of War in the 21st Century

Magnum Photos member Peter van Agtmael shares his journey as a conflict photographer, and the importance of adopting an open, questioning approach to photojournalism.

While at Yale, van Agtmael also developed a more critical approach to the mythos of America he had consumed as a youth. His friends, Chesa Boudin, now the District Attorney of San Francisco, and Sarah Sillman, currently a staff writer at The New Yorker, shared their perspectives on “how power is used to manipulate people across the political spectrum into a status quo narrative of the nature of American power and justice,” helping him to see beneath the surface of things and find a new way to engage.

The Twenty Years War

Peter van Agtmael has been documenting the Twenty Year War since its very beginning. I first spoke with him in 2007 and then again ten years later. He has published a number of books, all of them essential records of a country too embroiled in its own senseless militarism to recognise the folly of it all. There’s Disco Night Sept. 11, there is Buzzing at the Sill, and now there is Sorry for the War.

Fifty Years On...

  I stumble a bit, me, the former Math major, when I try and do the 'math.'   Last fall was fifty years:   I arrived in Vietnam in October 1...

When I told John I was heading to Vietnam, he said to me… “do a story for me -  call it  Children of War…”    I paused, then bagan to ask, “John, what do you want me to do… ?”  and before I could finish the sentence, he said “No, no!  You tell ME the Story.  YOU’re the journalist, your pictures should show ME the story.”  Over the decades since, I have been immensely glad for that teaching moment.

Blind – When War Reporters Document Peace

The VII Foundation presents a new book by photographer Gary Knight. Imagine: Reflections on Peace (also published in French as Imagine: Penser la paix), created in collaboration with several photo reporters and journalists, is a collection of 200 images accompanied by reflections on the imperfect construction of peace.

Photos: The 2020 Nagorno-Karabakh War

After six weeks of armed conflict between Azerbaijan and Armenia, a peace agreement, a handover of disputed territories, and mourning

One week ago, on November 10, a Russian-brokered ceasefire agreement was signed by the president of Azerbaijan and the prime minister of Armenia, ending six weeks of warfare over disputed territory in the Nagorno-Karabakh region. It is estimated that thousands of fighters and more than a hundred civilians were killed in the fierce conflict. Nagorno-Karabakh—officially part of Azerbaijan, but controlled by ethnic Armenians—broke away from Azerbaijan in a six-year-long war that ended in 1994, but was never completely resolved. In September of this year, simmering conflicts broke out into war once again, with each side blaming the other for escalations. The new ceasefire agreement cedes control of large areas of disputed territory back to Azerbaijan, and places 2,000 Russian soldiers in the area to act as peacekeepers. As the handover date approached last weekend, some villagers set their own homes on fire before fleeing to Armenia.
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He lost both legs and an arm to a bomb but still fights for others

Photographer and triple amputee Giles Duley – who lost his legs and an arm to an IED on assignment in Afghanistan – explains why losing his limbs has made him even more passionate about highlighting human suffering.

“People have asked me if I regret going to Afghanistan and whether any one photograph is worth losing your legs for,” says Duley, who is currently engaged on a long-term project photographing health workers in Britain and their battle to contain the coronavirus.