Access & Censorship

You Won’t Find the Trump White House on Flickr

A week after the inauguration of President Donald J. Trump, the White House announced the appointment of Shealah Craighead as Souza’s successor. The Obama Flickr feed was promptly moved to a new location to make room for the Trump administration, but two months later, not a single image has been uploaded. Not even the cover image has been changed from the default.

Reading the Trump “First 50 Days” Photo Album

You would think that the gift of this photo album, commemorating Trump’s first fifty days in office and showcasing the work of the official White House photographer, would erase, or at least allay the concerns raised by The New Yorker article. If anything though, the album brings the issues of Trump’s guardedness, the quality and amount of White House visual disclosure, and even internal photographic access within the administration into greater relief

Telling the Stories of Egypt’s Endangered Journalists

I was on a bus heading back to New York when I got news from Egypt that my brother Abdullah had been released from solitary confinement. I was so overwhelmed with joy, all I could do was scream hysterically. Then I realized: Our friend and colleague Shawkan wasn’t so lucky. I grew quiet, as the thought of Shawkan still imprisoned left me wondering. When would Shawkan and his family have their moment of relief and happiness?

Barring Reporters From Briefings: Does It Cross a Legal Line?

“That was unconstitutional,” he said. “If you exclude reporters from briefings that they otherwise have a right to attend because you don’t like their reporting, then you have engaged in viewpoint discrimination.” Viewpoint discrimination by the government in a public forum is almost always unconstitutional.

Cambodian Government Cites Trump in Threatening Foreign News Outlets

The Facebook comments “show pretty clearly that as soon as there are perceptions that the United States has wavered on its commitment to press freedom, then countries with authoritarian tendencies are very quick to abandon any pretense of allowing the media to operate freely,” said Shawn W. Crispin, the Bangkok-based Southeast Asia representative for the Committee to Protect Journalists, a nonpartisan advocacy group based in New York

Donald Trump and the Theater of Access

Reporters had been following Trump all year. Early rallies had been covered as curiosities; later ones as political mass spectacles. But on the eve of the election, it was clear that a perilous dynamic had been ignored. “He never once failed to invite his crowds to heckle us,” he wrote. “He was placing us on display like captured animals. And it worked.”

WhatsApp backdoor allows snooping on encrypted messages

Privacy campaigners said the vulnerability is a “huge threat to freedom of speech” and warned it can be used by government agencies to snoop on users who believe their messages to be secure. WhatsApp has made privacy and security a primary selling point, and has become a go to communications tool of activists, dissidents and diplomats.

No End In Sight

British journalist John Cantlie has been a prisoner of ISIS for more than four years. Throughout his captivity, he’s been forced to act as a sort of warped foreign correspondent, extolling the virtues of the group in propaganda videos. With every appearance, he looks weaker and gaunter. In this special hour, we consider how Cantlie’s plight is a window into the challenges of reporting on Syria, and why the world’s tangled policy on hostages means that some live to tell the tale, and others don’t. 

Categories