Would Showing Graphic Images of Mass Shootings Spur Action to Stop Them?

Returning to an old debate after the horrific killings in Uvalde, Texas.

The root of their pain lay in the photographs’ gruesome specificity and its capacity to answer in precise detail questions that were too lurid to have occurred otherwise: how the bodies lay; how the dead faces were contorted; how the spatters of blood patterned the walls. Many in the courtroom, journalists and family members alike, averted their eyes. It seemed that the cumulative detail of those images could tell them little that they did not already know: nine people were dead for no other reason than the color of their skin.

Watching the resistance

In western Canada, land defenders keep filming

As it is, newsrooms don’t necessarily prioritize sustained, nonviolent opposition in editorial decision-making. “The public eye wants violence and destruction, but turns away from our quiet resistance,” wrote Anne Spice, a Tlingit sociologist, and Denzel Sutherland-Wilson, a Gitxsan land defender, in the New Inquiry in 2019. “People are less interested in our governance systems operating as they should.”

Stringent Texas Anti-Drone Law Overturned in Federal Court

The oppressive drone laws in Texas have been found to be unconstitutional.

The drone law in question amounted to a broad ban on drone use for a wide range of purposes that included journalism. The NPPA says that it stood against the law back when it was first proposed in 2013 and, at the time, urged the legislature to reject the bill.

Photojournalist shot to death outside his home in Tijuana

Margarito Martínez Esquivel, a Tijuana photojournalist who covered police and security issues, was killed Monday

Martínez, 49, was beloved by colleagues and known as fearless. Last year, he documented a shootout between two groups, putting his own safety at risk. Journalist chat groups for Baja California were flooded with messages of grief and support on Monday afternoon.

Sony World Photo Awards Leaked Real Name, Forcing Photographer Into Exile

He has been living in exile ever since.

In 2018, Turkish photojournalist Uygar Önder Şimşek says he entered the prestigious Sony World Photography Awards under a pseudonym in order to protect his identity. His work was shortlisted, but the Awards mistakenly sent his real name to the media, forcing him to flee his homeland. He currently lives in exile.

Police in Minnesota Round Up, Detain Photographers Covering a Protest

Detained, forced on their stomachs, and not released until they submitted to having faces and press credentials photographed.

Tim Evans, a freelance photojournalist for the European Pressphoto Agency, says he was tackled to the ground, punched, and sprayed with chemical irritants. He claims that all the while, he was identifying himself as press with his credentials clearly visible. He goes on to claim that the officer who had carried out this attack took Evans’ press badge and threw it away, saying he didn’t care if he was with the media.

Opinion | Justice may finally arrive for photojournalist slain in Libya

Relatives must be allowed to know the fate of their loved ones.

Ten years ago, on April 5, 2011, photojournalist Anton Hammerl was killed in Libya when loyalists to Libyan dictator Moammar Gaddafi targeted Hammerl and several other journalists he was traveling with. The assailants opened fire on them although they clearly identified themselves as members of the international media.

Myanmar Soldiers, Aiming to Silence Protests, Target Journalists

The security forces have arrested at least 56 reporters, outlawed online news outlets and crippled communications. Young people have stepped in with their phones to help document the brutality.

Another photojournalist shot that day, U Si Thu, 36, was hit in his left hand as he was holding his camera to his face and photographing soldiers in Mandalay, the country’s second-largest city. He said he believes the soldier who shot him was aiming for his head.

Tennessee Bill to Make 'Offensive' Nonconsensual Photos Illegal

Tennessee state lawmakers working together with the Sullivan County District Attorney's Office have introduced a bill to the state legislature that seeks

This new law would target those who are taking “embarrassing” or “offensive” images of people in public but would apparently not target general public photography. This new bill, which you can read here, would make it illegal to take a photo for the purpose of “sexual gratification or arousal.” This would apply to photos that would offend or embarrass the subject or are focused specifically on an “intimate” part of the body.

Journalists Covering the 2021 Inauguration Urge Officials to Allow Them to Wear Protective Equipment

The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press (RCFP), National Press Photographers Association (NPPA), New York Times, and Washington Post are urging

“We heard through the Reporters Committee’s hotline that one photojournalist wore a bulletproof vest that prevented her from getting injured when she was stabbed by one of the members of the mob,” the letter reads. “Accordingly, we request that credentialed journalists covering the 2021 inauguration be allowed to carry this life-saving gear, at least outside the most secured area where the inauguration will occur.”

Reporters covering the Capitol attack were used to harassment and heckling. But Wednesday was different. - Poynter

Rioters spat at reporters and hurled slurs. They chased journalists down and destroyed their gear. Some physically assaulted media workers.

When Trump took the stage Wednesday at his “Save America” rally, he started his speech with a rant against the media, calling it “the biggest problem we have as far as I’m concerned — single biggest problem” and falsely claiming “fake news” had stolen the election. Hours later, some of his supporters had taken his message to heart and went after the media members who they saw as responsible for Trump’s loss in the 2020 election.

Covering Pro-Trump Mobs, the News Media Became a Target

“Murder the media” was scratched into a door of the Capitol. Violent protesters smashed equipment and punched a photographer.

As Trump supporters rampaged on Wednesday, incited by the president’s false claims of a stolen election, they hit on a secondary target: journalists.