Using Texts as Lures, Government Spyware Targets Mexican Journalists and Their Families – NYTimes.com

The targets include lawyers looking into the mass disappearance of 43 students, a highly respected academic who helped write anti-corruption legislation, two of Mexico’s most influential journalists and an American representing victims of sexual abuse by the police. The spying even swept up family members, including a teenage boy.

This Website Reveals How JPEG Photos Were Edited in Lightroom

As photographers, we’re always interested in how other people edit their photos to achieve a certain look. Pixel Peeper is a new website that can take a JPEG and tell you exactly how it was edited in Lightroom, along with the camera model, lens, and settings — as long as that info is found in the file’s EXIF data.

War photographer Alessio Romenzi on covering conflict and managing his fear – LA Times

Photographer Alessio Remenzi has been covering conflict in the Middle East since the Arab Spring and was among the first photographers smuggled into Syria to cover the civil war. Most recently he has been covering the battle for Mosul, Iraq. He was previously interviewed by The Times in 2012. He recently discussed covering the fighting in Iraq.

Larry Fink, The Polarities – The Eye of Photography

The portrait of American society that Fink sketches out starting in the 1950s continues. The Polarities narrates modern America, the radical changes between the Obama years and the arrival of Trump, the society of the spectacle – in which “the show must go on” – and the continuing divide between metropolitan and rural areas. Here, Fink’s images recall those of the Farm Security Administration, the great project designed to study the American territory between 1935 and 1943.

On the closure of Roger Viollet Agency – The Eye of Photography

The City of Paris wants to shut down the legendary Roger Viollet Agency it inherited in 1985, following the murder of the owner by her husband and the suicide of the latter in prison

A Bygone Era of Big City Life – The New York Times

“Mehr Licht” — more light — were Goethe’s famous last words. That deathbed declaration was also the title of Fred Stein’s only book, featuring images taken along Fifth Avenue, which was published posthumously. What could be more fitting?

Photographers Turn Their Lens to the Refugee Crisis in Belgrade – Feature Shoot

Close to 75,000 refugees are still living in a state of limbo between the Balkans and Greece, unable to enter the EU due to reinforced border control. Their living conditions are often deplorable, their prospects bleak. “Around 1000 on these refugees are sleeping rough in abandoned warehouses, train wagons and shacks in the central station of Belgrade, the capital of Serbia” reveal Danish photographers Ulrik Hasemann and Mathias Svold, discussing the focus of their project The Lost Boys of Belgrade.

Rules for Photojournalism in the age of social media – Thoughts of a Bohemian

The world of photojournalism has changed but photojournalists do not seem to have noticed. Either schooled by tired teachers repeating the same outdated mantra to wide-eyed students or self-taught by blindly following obsolete rules, they are hitting a wall of incomprehension and misunderstanding. The result is an unhealthy combination of painful frustration and very poor reach. Change is long overdue and for this purpose, here are some preliminary elements for a better understanding.

The World According to Black Women Photographers – The New York Times

As a young photographer growing up in Brownsville, Brooklyn, Laylah Amatullah Barrayn was deeply influenced by Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe’s book “Viewfinders: Black Women Photographers.” The 1986 book took a historical look at female photographers from the 1800s to the present day and left her eager to see more.

Magnum Protest Photography: Capturing the Emotion of Protest | Time.com

Photography’s role in this democratic exercise has changed over the years, particularly as technology has developed and mutated, and a new Magnum Photo exhibition makes that clear by looking back at the scale and impact of protest photography from the 1930s up until the present day.

8K When Stills & Motion Converge *Without Apologies or Qualifiers « Vincent Laforet’s Blog

The Key here is that a STILL image garnered attention at a CINEMA event …   why, well obviously it was shot on a motion camera at 8K – in this case the RED WEAPON 8K camera which is capable of capturing 36 megapixel stills in full RAW up to 60 times per second.     And when you slow down to look at the quality of this image… it kind of speaks to the future of where we all are headed.

Update: Photographer Khadija Saye Killed in London Grenfell Tower Fire | PDNPulse

A graduate of the University for the Creative Arts, Farnham, Saye uses photography to explore culture and identity, and has photographed communities in both England and Gambia, where her mother was born. The Diversity Pavilion, on view at the Venice Biennale, includes Saye’s tintype self-portraits in which she incorporates objects her mother uses in her spiritual practice. Artist Nicola Green, who mentored Saye, said in an appeal for information, “She is our dear friend, a beautiful soul and emerging artist.”

Sony SLT Camera Found in Crashed North Korean Spy Drone

According to Reuters, South Korean authorities said that the drone had apparently crashed while flying back to North Korea after shooting photos of an advanced U.S. anti-missile battery located in South Korea.

Danielle Villasana’s Advice on Applying for Grants and Awards | PDNPulse

Here is her advice about writing successful grant applications. Grant writing is hard, photography grants are competitive and, as Villasana notes, rejection is inevitable. But here she explain how you can turn the rejection of your grant application to your advantage

A Fascinating Portrait of the Working-Class in Northern England in the 1970s and 1980s – Feature Shoot

North England as presented by Manx photographer and Harvard professor Chris Killip is bleak not only for the lack of colour, but for the immediacy at which it hits the viewer that the subjects reside in a world where there are no prospects. Work, for those who work hard, is often intrinsically entangled with one’s identity. When an industry ceases to exist, for its former workers it’s literally like being lost in the fog that so often hangs like a weight behind the protagonists of Chris’ photographs.

The Art of Difference | by Hilton Als | The New York Review of Books

Both he and Arbus used the word “freaks” to describe their subjects (a word I found disparaging and objected to, albeit silently in his presence). But Arbus’s subjects were unlike Mitchell’s: her photographs showed them pursuing their otherness with a fierce velocity that had little in common with his ultimately more assimilated characters, seen through the skein of his elegant and sometimes ironical prose.

Portraits from a Genocide – PhotoShelter Blog

Photographs act as records, and records are what the Nazis and Khmer Rouge sought to create during their brutal genocides of the 20th century. Portraits of thousands of men, women and children taken shortly before their deaths is a savage reminder of the photo as a weapon, but ironically also illustrates how the photos came back to haunt the perpetrators as evidence of their crimes against humanity.

What’s behind the recent media bloodbath? The dominance of Google and Facebook – Poynter

“There is a clear correlation between layoffs and buyouts with the growth in market share for the duopoly — Google and Facebook,” said Jason Kint, CEO of the trade organization Digital Content Next, in an email to Poynter.

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