The Chinese Art of the Crowd

After viewing news photographs from China for years, one of my favorite visual themes is “large crowds in formation.”

After viewing news photographs from China for years, one of my favorite visual themes is "large crowd formations."  Whether the subject is military parades or world-record attempts, mass exercises or enormous performances, the images are frequently remarkable. The masses of people can look beautiful or intimidating, projecting a sense of strength and abundance. Individuals can become pixels in a huge painting, or points on a grid, or echoes of each other in identical uniforms or costumes

Marc McAndrews: American Ultraviolence

Photographer's Photographer, Marc McAndrews' new project, American Ultraviolence, allows us entree into the world of extreme wrestling, where blood and posturing are part of the spectacle. Marc's work often explores fringe cultures, including his well-reg

Photographer’s Photographer, Marc McAndrews’ new project, American Ultraviolence, allows us entree into the world of extreme wrestling, where blood and posturing are part of the spectacle. Marc’s work often explores fringe cultures, including his well-regarded project, Nevada Rose that took a look at life in legal brothels. This access comes from being present and being curious and hours and hours behind a wheel.

Berenice Abbott, Writing Her Own History

The expanded archives of the pioneering photographer Berenice Abbott detail not just the range of her eye, but also the obstacles she confronted and overcame.

Laid out on the counter were portraits of the famous and the nameless, unpretentious wedding pictures, grandiose industrial architectural details, midcentury American scenes and close-ups of a brain, a wrench and a creepy-crawler. Next to them, a few yellowed notes. One, signed by the French writer Jean Cocteau, declared: “She exposes her delicious memory. She is a chess game between light and shadow.” The subject? His friend, the noted 20th century photographer Berenice Abbott.

Paris Photo LA 2015 : Diary of David Hume Kennerly – The Eye of Photography

As a photographer, and one who truly loves other people’s pictures, I try not to be critical, but when I see so many photographs in one place, my mind immediately goes into contest judging mode. I can’t help but sort the vast display of work into winners and losers categories. And that’s how most people look at art, whether they admit it or not, especially if they want to buy something.

Daimon Xanthopoulos - Portrait of West Africa's Secret Societies | LensCulture

Magic and secret societies play an important role in society of Sierra Leone and Liberia. It is something that is everywhere and part of politics, culture and religion. Secret societies can be found in all levels of society. Magic and the fight against wi

Magic and secret societies play an important role in society of Sierra Leone and Liberia. It is something that is everywhere and part of politics, culture and religion. Secret societies can be found in all levels of society. Magic and the fight against witchcraft is one major reason that the secret societies are so influential. All secret societies are using herbs and ceremonies to fight against the witchcraft. Witched people or children are being persecuted by a special healers union and even killed in some occasions. In the villages there are bush schools and dancing devel ceremonies. A portrait of mystical Sierra Leone, meeting traditional priests, hidden societies and magical healers.

carla kogelman - New Dutch Photography Talent: Carla Kogelman | LensCulture

A prime example of an upcoming and hardworking talent is Carla Kogelman (1961, Raalte). A selection of her black and white children's portraits was featured in New 2013 and presented with a World Press Photo award in 2014. Recently she received a grant fr

A prime example of an upcoming and hardworking talent is Carla Kogelman (1961, Raalte). A selection of her black and white children's portraits was featured in New 2013 and presented with a World Press Photo award in 2014. Recently she received a grant from the International Festival Photoreporter in the Baie of Saint Brieuc which will give her the opportunity to document the Xhosa generation in South Africa and Kogelman was shortlisted for the Sony World Photography Awards. Considering her previous success, were curious to hear how her career had progressed and decided to catch up with the Dutch photographer whose work evokes that of the American Sally Mann.

Photographers Revisit the Site of the Vietnam War, 40 Years Later - Feature Shoot

Berlin-based photographers Miguel Hahn and Jan- Christoph Hartung, who together form Hahn+Hartung, go against the grain of tradition war photography in that they are drawn not to modern-day battlefields but rather those that have been forgotten and buried

Berlin-based photographers Miguel Hahn and Jan- Christoph Hartung, who together form Hahn+Hartung, go against the grain of tradition war photography in that they are drawn not to modern-day battlefields but rather those that have been forgotten and buried by decades of history. For Texas Saigon, the duo returned to the scene of the Vietnam War, piecing together a story told by wounds that remain unhealed—if bandaged—forty years after the Fall of Saigon on April 30th, 1975.

Andre Kertesz, Watching From Above

From his window perch, Andre Kertesz captured candid moments where his subjects were unaware the master photographer was watching them.

A new show at the Stephen Bulger Gallery in Toronto titled “Surveillance” seeks to answer that question, featuring photographs Kertesz, who died in 1985, made using telephoto lenses, or at times a telescope attached to his camera. The show takes a photographer known for his still lifes, portraits of artists, and later work from his apartment overlooking Washington Square Park and places him on an entirely different stage.

American Archives - Photographs and text by Tetsuya Kusu | LensCulture

A Japanese photographer set out to challenge his own stereotypes and find the “real” America

As a member of the last generation to adore America, I was struck by a desire to see the real America—so I got in a car and hit the road. There, in between the vaguely nostalgic scenery I remembered, I found people who lived commonplace, dull, and unsurprising ordinary lives just like us. My stereotype of America changed its shape and began manifesting itself in front of me with a strange sense of familiarity.

Moving Pictures: Insight from a Photo Editor - Interview with Smithsonian Magazine editor Molly Roberts | LensCulture

With decades of experience in the industry under her belt, Chief Photography Editor Molly Roberts speaks about the importance of strong visual foundations and photography’s ability to stop you in your tracks

In talking with young photographers, even ones whose work I really like, I want to encourage them to know more: about the history of photography, the people who have walked the paths they are walking. There are so many different references that we should all have as part of our visual vocabulary. But some people have no idea, it feels like young photojournalists don't learn those things any more.

Behind the Scenes of the Fast-Paced, Small-Budget Movies of Dhallywood

Growing up in Dhaka, Bangladesh, Sarker Protick would look forward to Friday afternoons, when, on the national television channel, he could count on...

Growing up in Dhaka, Bangladesh, Sarker Protick would look forward to Friday afternoons, when, on the national television channel, he could count on the screening of a Dhallywood film. Full of epic romances and cartoonish violence, the movies made by the country’s film industry were exercises in extremes, made quickly and with small budgets to appeal to the widest possible audience. For the young Protick, they offered a glimpse into a fantastical world.

A Complex Self-Portrait of Africa

A prizewinning Nigerian photographer has devoted himself to documenting his nation’s social and political growth, offering an alternative narrative to the usual story of Africans as victims.

Holding a retrospective exhibit after only 15 years as a professional photographer may seem unexpected. But such was the timing for Akintunde Akinleye, the only Nigerian photojournalist to have won a World Press Photo prize, in 2007. Since then, he has continued his work for Reuters, capturing life in the heart of Lagos, whose population of more than 20 million makes it Africa’s largest city.

The Ruins of Nepal

Nepalis started fleeing their devastated capital of Kathmandu on April 27 after Saturday's earthquake killed more than 3,700 people and toppled entire streets, as the United Nations prepared a "massive" aid operation.

Nepalis started fleeing their devastated capital of Kathmandu on April 27 after Saturday's earthquake killed more than 3,700 people and toppled entire city blocks