Searching for a Human Side in North Korea - Photographs by David De Vleeschauwer | LensCulture

A portrait of “the Hermit Kingdom”—a photographic effort to pierce the veil of mutual misunderstanding and find something human beneath the grandiose propaganda and widespread misinformation

Lost in this sea of misunderstanding are, of course, the people of the country itself. Belgian travel photographer David de Vleeschauwer decided to visit the country with "an open mind and the belief that something human lies behind...despite negative reporting in the West."

Rebuilding Lives After a Factory Collapse in Bangladesh – NYTimes.com

An hour after the Rana Plaza garment factory collapsed in Dhaka, Bangladesh, Abir Abdullah got to the scene unsure where to begin taking pictures. More than a thousand people had died and hundreds more were trapped alive in the rubble. Injured workers were screaming and crying all around him as rescue workers pulled bodies from the debris.

Germany: Service by Platon at Jablonka Galerie – The Eye of Photography

“Service” took many weeks to develop but Platon’s enthusiasm for the project never faltered. He rose to each photographic challenge, no matter what difficulties a shoot presented. Like a house being built, stone by stone, the photographs were crafted into a sequence of spreads that in the end added up to an exceptional essay. Access was difficult, shoot times often limited, and making each spread unique instead of repetitive was a great challenge. In addition to portraiture for which Platon is well known, he took documentary images, and even some still-lives. In the end the New Yorker published a series 16 pages and won a National Magazine Award for it. Bravo Platon!

Photographer Documents the Perilous Journey of Central American Migrants to the U.S. - Feature Shoot

The Suchiate River is the crossing point between Mexico and Guatemala for thousands of Central American migrants hoping to make it to El Norte, the United States. They cross the water on a couple of beat-up intertubes with planks of plywood taped on top o

The Suchiate River is the crossing point between Mexico and Guatemala for thousands of Central American migrants hoping to make it to El Norte, the United States. They cross the water on a couple of beat-up intertubes with planks of plywood taped on top of them. Mexican photojournalist Rodrigo Cruz shot these migrants across the Guatemala-Mexico frontier for his latest project Frontera Sur.

A bold and beautiful portrait of Brazil

With the 2016 Olympics on the horizon in Rio de Janeiro, a look at Brazil's vibrancy through a Washington Post photographer's Instagram.

Ahead of the upcoming 2016 Olympics to be held in Rio de Janeiro, Washington Post staff photographer Bonnie Jo Mount traveled to Piquiá de Baixo to document a community of residents in clay-brick and wooden houses suffering from the heavy pollution from nearby pig iron factories and the noisy Carajás railway that runs through the Amazon region transporting ore.

Migrants at the gates, lives in the balance along the shores of Europe

Hundreds of migrants have perished at sea journeying to Europe, and hundreds more await asylum assessments at the door of coastal European cities.

Panos Pictures photographer Carlos Spottorno has been documenting incoming immigrants and their experience along various European coastal cities for years. “They leave their home countries because poverty, war and hunger have made their lives intolerable, and they’re determined to find a better life for themselves, and maybe their families back home,”  he describes about his series via Panos Pictures. “Some of them travel for years, being passed from one trafficker to the other at the mercy of unscrupulous criminals who see them as a commodity and play on their desperation.”

African-American Life, Double-Exposed

“Through the African American Lens,” culled from a Smithsonian collection, shows how photography — and black photographers — reshaped a people’s image.

The late 1930s image by Eliot Elisofon shows Zack Brown taking a picture of two dapper African-American men on a Harlem street. It challenged the then-dominant view of black urban life, focusing on dignity instead of suffering, self-possession instead of defeat, happiness instead of sorrow. Mr. Elisofon’s picture also reminds us of the powerful role of photography in African-American life, how the medium — and black photographers — helped reshape the image of a people.

A Visual Remix

Some artists have become digital collectors, turning other people’s pictures into new images with new meanings.

In the seven years between the invention of the daguerreotype and Whitman’s visit to Plumbe’s, the medium had become popular enough to generate an impressive, and even hectic, stream of images. Now, toward the end of photography’s second century, that stream has become torrential.

Searching for Peace and Justice in Guatemala

The civil war ended almost 20 years ago, but the country is struggling to bring justice to communities shattered by the conflict.

The war no longer rages, but conflicts persist. That realization led James Rodriguez, a Mexican-American photographer living in Guatemala, to document the continuing search for justice in a country whose people find peace by leaving the country by any means necessary.

Miracles and Tragedies: Conveying the Wonder of Life Through Photographs - Photographs by and interview with Chris Jordan | LensCulture

Inspirational artist Chris Jordan shares his views on the power of photography — “Art has always made an immeasurably important difference in human culture, and right now might be the most potent time ever for the arts to contribute to the healing and tra

But perhaps the most mysterious part for me is the way the medium can transmit feeling. Digital cameras record millions of tiny electrical signals that get sent down wires and through multiple computers; and yet somehow the feeling of the photographer's relationship with the subject can make it through that whole process intact. For me that is one of the greatest powers of photography—to convey relationships, which for me, are all about reverence.

Tracing the Dark Roots of Border Smuggling

Very few photographers have the gift of finding beauty within conflict. Photographer Dominic Bracco II believes that it’s important to humanize the individuals involved in violent confrontations. One of his photographs in particular illustrates this princ

Very few photographers have the gift of finding beauty within conflict. Photographer Dominic Bracco II believes that it’s important to humanize the individuals involved in violent confrontations. One of his photographs in particular illustrates this principle—a striking image of a murdered man and pregnant woman embracing in a dark vehicle in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. The image won him a second place prize in the 2011 POYi competition, bringing him international recognition.

The Impossibly Meticulous Photography of Andrew Myers

It’s funny. It’s weird. And we can’t stop looking at it.

In the age of digital image making, we’ve grown to accept that even the most photorealistic images are really just electronic fabrications. It’s led to visual sensibilities that make the real and the unreal tough to distinguish. A world of impeccably composed, crisp lines, hotly lit with fully saturated color.

Digging for Gold in the Andes

Moises Saman photographed unregulated gold mining in the ramshackle town of La Rinconada, in the Peruvian Andes.

The mines at La Rinconada, a bitter-cold, mercury-contaminated pueblo clinging to the glaciered mountainside, are “artisanal”—small, unregulated, and grossly unsafe. To stave off disaster, the miners propitiate the mountain deities with tiny liquor bottles. CREDITPHOTOGRAPH BY MOISES SAMAN / MAGNUM

Photographer Documents the Rapid Development of Chongqing, a 21st Century Megacity - Feature Shoot

If you’re measuring by sheer space, Chongqing is the largest city in China. Over the last few decades, it has grown so large that in 1997 its status was changed from that of a city in Sichuan province to a direct-controlled municipality; it was essentiall

If you’re measuring by sheer space, Chongqing is the largest city in China. Over the last few decades, it has grown so large that in 1997 its status was changed from that of a city in Sichuan province to a direct-controlled municipality; it was essentially made its own mini-province. In the latest project from Tim Franco, Metamorpolis, the Shanghai-based photographer seeks to document the 21st century mega-city, in all its gritty magnitude.