Turning Points: Life-Changing Moments by Magnum Photographers - Photographs and texts courtesy of Magnum Photos | LensCulture

From iconic images of major world events, to intimate moments of pleasure and delight — here is an outstanding selection of remarkable images from Magnum Photos — each with a personal story

13 Photographers on Turning Points in Their Work

Elliott Erwitt, Zun Lee, Alec Soth, and more on the turning points in their photographs—from global and national events to the most personal moments.

Turning points in the lives and works of photographers often span the extremes—from global and national events to the most personal moments. Photographers such as Alec Soth and Zun Lee are able to not only bear witness to events that shape our collective history, but also to map more intimate transitions within their craft and their everyday lives.

Bruce Gilden : Lost and Found

In collaboration with Magnum Photos, 10 Corso Como New York presents LOST AND FOUND, an exhibition of Bruce Gilden’s early New York street photographs from the mid 70s through 80s as well as his more recent fashion images.

Perspective | A photographer looks back at his work in New York City in the 1980s

Magnum photographer Bruce Gilden uncovers 75 images of New York shot between 1978 and 1984.

Bruce Gilden calls the photo “The Strangler.” The long-time Magnum photographer was just walking down a street of New York when he came across the scene. “It’s one of the few pictures where I can remember the scenario,” he said. “These two guys were having this battle in the street. They were so drunk and one had his hand on the other’s neck for a minute.”

Bruce Gilden’s Gritty Vision of a Lost New York

The street photographer’s new book of recently discovered pictures from the seventies and eighties, “Lost and Found,” shows the vibrance and squalor of the city.

Street photography has always been a predatory enterprise. Traditionally, the intrepid photographer sets out on the streets as if on safari, picking off prey with a camera unobtrusive enough to not raise the hackles of the local wildlife. (The 35-mm. Leica, introduced, in 1925, at the Leipzig Spring Fair, practically produced the genre, due to its then-novel portability, low profile, and whisper-quiet shutter.) Bruce Gilden, however, has made a name for himself by getting in people’s faces. When he stalks the streets, it is often with a blinding flash attached to his camera, which he’ll pop off at an arm’s length from his subjects, petrifying them in the glare. To extend the safari metaphor: this is akin to dismounting from your jeep and gambolling over to a lion so you can play a game of amateur animal tamer. Remarkably, he did this in New York in the nineteen-eighties. Gilden certainly had some gall.

Listen to Martin Parr and Bruce Gilden Talk Photography |

It's always a treat to listen to two major talents talk shop.

In “Sofa Sessions,” a new video series from the Martin Parr Foundation, you get a chance to see just that. In the latest installment, Parr sits down for a chat with street photographer Bruce Gilden. The two discuss Gilden’s background. thoughts on photography today and a lot more.

Bruce Gilden Has Balls | Leicaphilia

I like Gilden. It takes a lot of balls to walk up to someone on the street and push a flash camera in their face. Does it take some special photographic talent? No. But that’s not the point. It takes a certain unified vision. The point is Gilden has created an aesthetic unique to him and hasn’t much deviated from it in 50 years. As such, he’s created a large, coherent body of work. I’ve heard people criticize his work, claiming it gimmicky and artless, something any 8th grader would be capable of. Could your kid have taken these pictures? Yes. But your kid didn’t, and Gilden did, just like it would have been within your kid’s skill set to have painted Jackson Pollock’s Alchemy, 1947. Your kid didn’t, because your kid would have never considered the aesthetic potential inherent in the medium. The genius of Pollock -and Gilden- is having seen the aesthetic others missed.

This Legendary Street Photographer Traveled to State Fairs. See the Haunting Portraits He Captured

The photos are part of a series called 'Farm Boys and Farm Girls'

Bruce Gilden has shadowed the residents of cities around the world, capturing the dark side of urban dwellers with a flash in hand. His often-confrontational take on street photography is framed within his modern day film noir sensibility. Since the start of his career in 1968, he says, he has been compared to legendary street photographers like Weegee, William Klein and Lisette Model.” These are photographers who created a new space in a genre that has existed since photography’s inception, pioneering styles that were entirely personal and captured an attitude about their time and perception of the world. Fifty years later, Gilden has carved out a place for himself with almost twenty books in this category. Now he’s redefining himself again.

Exploring Detroit’s Soul – The Leica Camera Blog

Street photography can come in many shapes and sizes. For Bruce Gilden, it has a strong definition, one that is exemplified by the close up images he takes of people in the streets. “Detroit: Against the Wind” is Magnum photographer Bruce Gilden’s ode to the Midwestern city and its inhabitants. The exhibition, open until October 6th, commissioned by Leica UK, includes more than 20 new photographs taken by Gilden earlier this year, shot on the Leica M-System.

LFI artist talk – Bruce Gilden (video) - Leica Rumors

Magnum photographer Bruce Gilden is talking about his projects: Coney Island, Haiti, Black Country and American Made. Related posts: “American Made” by Bruce Gilden (video) Bruce Gilden on his project for RATP Bruce Gilden – Postcards from America, Magnum

Magnum photographer Bruce Gilden is talking about his projects: Coney Island, Haiti, Black Country and American Made.

Bruce Gilden’s Mardi Gras

Gilden’s images from New Orleans in the seventies and eighties find confrontations of character and power amid Carnival’s topsy-turvy social order.

We find here, of course, the mirth of the party, though less than we might expect, as well as many photos in which the “underdog”—Gilden’s preferred subject—has his day

Bruce Gilden & the Absence of Empathy - PhotoShelter Blog

I used to believe that photojournalism represented a platonic ideal of veracity, but this naïve notion has eroded. The cause of this loss of innocence isn’t limited to the high profile manipulation that has dogged the industry, but also the realization th

I confess to being previously enamored of Gilden’s style – if nothing else, I have respect for people who do “their thing” for years and years. But after reading May’s article, and seeing Gilden’s images shot over a paltry two days, the love affair is over. Gilden’s images are nothing more than caricatures. His essay is a visual freakshow that says little about the place or the people, and more about creating provocative clickbait. If his intent is to trigger disgust, then mission accomplished

Listen: Is Bruce Gilden’s ‘Two Days in Appalachia’ Poverty Porn? | American Photo

Roger May, the director of Looking at Appalachia, which recently got some nice coverage on Lens, was invited on West Virginia’s “Front Porch” podcast to discuss. Embedded above, you’ll hear 20 minutes of very fair criticism exploring whether Gilden’s garish images feed into existing stereotypes that plague the region in the wake of a long history of exploitative visual representation made by those who parachute in. Or, whether by virtue of being just about indistinguishable from the work Gilden makes anywhere he goes, they engage with that history in a more nuanced way.

A Collection of Bruce Gilden's Up Close and Personal Portraits - Feature Shoot

“They’re my friends for twenty minutes,” says New York City-based photographer Bruce Gilden of the personalities that together make up his newest book Face. Over the past few years, he has collected the countenances of those who spend their lives overlook

“They’re my friends for twenty minutes,” says New York City-based photographer Bruce Gilden of the personalities that together make up his newest book Face. Over the past few years, he has collected the countenances of those who spend their lives overlooked and unseen in crowds, visages that when scrutinized, slip from the familiar and banal and over—ever so slightly—into the extraordinary.

You Can’t, and Shouldn’t, Ignore These Faces

There are 50 portraits in Bruce Gilden’s new book, Face, published by Dewi Lewis, and it’s a safe bet you’ll probably remember all of them.

There are 50 portraits in Bruce Gilden’s new book, Face, published by Dewi Lewis, and it’s a safe bet you’ll probably remember all of them.

Two Days in Appalachia

Every person in Appalachia has a relationship with God, intentionally or otherwise. You could say the same thing about these pictures taken by Magnum photographer Bruce Gilden.

Photos by Bruce Gilden / Magnum Photos Appalachia is beautiful. The mountains and the forests make it so. But the region's topography has a strange effect on those who call its habitable valleys, crevices, and crannies home. Most of the towns exist, to some extent, in isolation. Sure, roads and technology connect them to the outside world, but when you're inside, they can feel like landlocked islands. The result is that God is everywhere. That is to say, you encounter religiosity everywhere, not just because of the population's devotion but because that devotion has nowhere to go. It's born into the world, only to bounce off the mountains and echo right back to Main Street. The pot has nowhere to overflow, so every person in Appalachia has a relationship with God, intentionally or otherwise. You could say the same thing about these pictures.

Bruce Gilden on his project for RATP - Leica Rumors

In this new Magnum Photos video Bruce Gilden speaks about his photographic project for RATP currently shown in 16 stations of the Parisian Metro and at Polka Galerie: Related posts: Bruce Gilden – Postcards from America, Magnum Miami (video) “American Mad

In this new Magnum Photos video Bruce Gilden speaks about his photographic project for RATP currently shown in 16 stations of the Parisian Metro and at Polka Galerie