Fifty Years On...

  I stumble a bit, me, the former Math major, when I try and do the 'math.'   Last fall was fifty years:   I arrived in Vietnam in October 1...

When I told John I was heading to Vietnam, he said to me… “do a story for me -  call it  Children of War…”    I paused, then bagan to ask, “John, what do you want me to do… ?”  and before I could finish the sentence, he said “No, no!  You tell ME the Story.  YOU’re the journalist, your pictures should show ME the story.”  Over the decades since, I have been immensely glad for that teaching moment.

‘When the heart gets filtered up through the camera’: Vietnam War photographers on how to cover COVID better

On February 29, Washington State health officials announced what they believed to be the first death due to the novel coronavirus in the United States. By March 31, the official national death toll stood at 3,173. It was a larger number, news outlets n

“War is 95 percent boredom and 5 percent sheer terror, from a journalist’s point of view,” says David Hume Kennerly, who won a 1972 Pulitzer Prize for his feature photography of the Vietnam War. CJR sat down with Kennerly and three other esteemed photojournalists from that conflict, Art Greenspon, Robert Hodierne, and David Burnett, to ask what lessons we can take from Vietnam to cover today’s invisible killer and the absence of public suffering.

Photographing Impeachment Proceedings Against Three Presidents

David Burnett, whose images from the Watergate hearings and Clinton impeachment have become iconic, will be on hand as the Senate decides the fate of Donald Trump.

For more than half a century, David Burnett has been photographing impeachments, wars, revolutions, Olympic Games, and artists, making himself one of the stars of his field. He got his start around the time of the moon landing, when he had the idea to take pictures of the people watching that historic event. A couple of years later he was in Vietnam, where he was present when the Associated Press’s Nick Ut took a legendary photograph of a nine-year-old girl covered in napalm. Burnett gained wider renown several years later for his work in Iran during and after the Revolution. Since that time, he has shot numerous sporting events, and compiled a book about the reggae star Bob Marley.

Photojournalist David Burnett has switched to Sony after 40 years with Canon! – sonyalpharumors sonyalpharumors

Photo history is a long litany of the lost and found. Reputations rise and fall; trends and tools come and go. A photographer might be the toast of the town for a time, then fall into oblivion a few short years later. William Mortensen, anyone? The opposite of Mortensen might be someone like Mike Disfarmer or Vivian Maier who bursts onto the scene from nowhere and is quickly integrated into the canon. Critical variance seems more the rule than the exception, and the pace of that variance has only increased of late as we plunge further into the end-times.

This is the Pain of Loading Film Into an Old Leica II from the 1930s

Renowned photojournalist David Burnett just posted this short 2-minute video showing how you load film into the old screw-mount, knob-wind Leica II, a

Renowned photojournalist David Burnett just posted this short 2-minute video showing how you load film into the old screw-mount, knob-wind Leica II, a rangefinder introduced in 1932.

Business of Editorial Photography – Panel Discussion - The Photo Brigade

This special Business of Editorial Photography Panel Discussion features some of the best photographers on the planet: David Bergman, David Burnett, Al Tielemans, Rob Tringali, and via Skype, Robert Seale. Moderated by PhotoShelter's Allen Murabayashi, th

This special Business of Editorial Photography Panel Discussion features some of the best photographers on the planet: David Bergman, David Burnett, Al Tielemans, Rob Tringali, and via Skype, Robert Seale. Moderated by PhotoShelter‘s Allen Murabayashi, they talk about their collective 100+ years of experience working for the top publications of our times

A New Day in Newburgh

David Burnett has traveled the world on assignment. So why hadn’t he done anything in the upstate New York town he now calls home?

The world traveler David Burnett was back home in the Hudson Valley when his wife’s cousin challenged him to an assignment. “She threw an elbow at me,” Mr. Burnett recalled. “ ‘Sure, you go off to France, Spain and Vienna. But what about Newburgh?’ ”

David Burnett: Marathon Man — zPhotoJournal

To be a photographer in this age, you have to really WANT to do it.  Don’t do it just because you can’t think of anything else to do.  Go to workshops, and perhaps more important, use your library and even the web to find work which inspires you.  One of the things which I find so disconcerting is that very few young photographers today can tell you who the photojournalists of note were in the 50's, 60's, and 70's. I fear there is a certain kind of self-validation which shooting/seeing immediately engenders

Are Personal Projects Worth It? Why David Burnett, Ami Vitale & David duChemin Say Yes - PhotoShelter Blog

How important are personal photography projects to distinguishing your voice? And will a project on the side help catch the eye of your dream client? In our guide, The Inspiration Handbook: 50 Tips from 50 Photography Trailblazers, we got advice from Davi

How important are personal photography projects to distinguishing your voice? And will a project on the side help catch the eye of your dream client? In our guide, The Inspiration Handbook: 50 Tips from 50 Photography Trailblazers, we got advice from David Burnett, Ami Vitale, David duChemin, Dixie Dixon, Scott Strazzante, Dianne Debicella, and Jonathan Gayman who share why personal projects really matter.

The Heralded Veteran Who Still Reaches for Film - PhotoShelter Blog

For nearly 50 years, David Burnett has been traveling and documenting the world – much of it on film. While most of the photojournalism world has shifted to using digital photography exclusively, Burnett stubbornly continues to carry around a Speed Graphi

For nearly 50 years, David Burnett has been traveling and documenting the world – much of it on film. While most of the photojournalism world has shifted to using digital photography exclusively, Burnett stubbornly continues to carry around a Speed Graphic camera and dozens of sheet film holders – making him instantly recognizable on the sidelines of events such as the Olympics.

Photo Brigade Podcast #55 with David Burnett - The Photo Brigade

On this very special episode, legendary photojournalist David Burnett joins Robert Caplin in our first video podcast, recorded live in NYC.

On this very special episode, legendary photojournalist David Burnett joins me in our first Video podcast, recorded live at Adorama in NYC. David and I talk about everything from getting his start in photography in high school, his first time being published in Time Magazine, his time in Iran, Vietnam, his relationship and access to Bob Marley, business of photography, and so much more. This is one you don’t want to miss. Sit back, relax, and enjoy this episode of The Photo Brigade Podcast! 

David Burnett | An Interview

"If You Could Find Other Ways In Photojournalism To Put Talented Groups Of People Together, Good Editors, Our World Would Be Damn Near Perfect." —David Burnett

This Just In: Luminance 2012 Speaker Videos - PhotoShelter Blog

If you haven’t noticed, we’re surrounded by photography. We not only consume copious amounts of photography through social media and everywhere else online, but we’re just as likely to create photos on a daily basis – whether it’s with our DSLRs or phones

From the most decorated of photographers (David Burnett, Zack Arais, Peter Yang), to the technologists who are redefining how photos are captured (leaders from 20×200, Lytro, Facebook Photos), Luminance provided a tremendous amount of thought provoking material, which we are excited to share with you with our Luminance 2012 Speaker Videos

2012 Summer Olympics – David Burnett

I am not saying that there is no good to be had from the new technologies. Far from it. The new cameras let us make pictures that were never even imaginable a dozen years ago. But in all of that, in the rush to bestow the crown of technical achievement upon the head of digital photography, I think we risk losing a piece of the soul of all our work. And whatever each of us can do as individuals to get beyond the norm, the expected, the predictable, and the obvious that is what photography in the new century demands of us.

A Tyranny of Ones

There just didn’t seem to be enough hours in the day that I could manage so that the work load of both shooting and file management was done with confidence  and competence.  In addition,  I was exhibiting signs of retrograde camera envy.  Besides the digital cameras at hand, I wanted to shoot with my 1940s Speed Graphic, a beautiful old beast of a press camera, with a 1943 aerial recon camera lens on it.  I have shot with this camera for a decade, and find that when I look into its amazing viewfinder, I see things I just miss with my digi cams.  The old lens, long and fast, sees the world in a very different way than the Canons, and in many ways IS a perfect foil for the smaller more agile counterparts.  First, it uses Film.  There is no practical affordable digital back for a 4×5” camera at least not yet, and frankly I kind of hope no one develops one anytime soon.  There is, in the use of film, film holders, and a semi ancient camera, something very satisfying, very “I have to get this in ONE shot,” something very, shall we say, Romantic.