New York City’s Kids, Back at School

Kids, masked, greeted their teachers with pantomimed high-fives. Some rushed jubilantly toward their classmates, while others solemnly maintained a perimeter of personal space.

On Tuesday, after seven months of closure due to the coronavirus pandemic, and two reopening delays, New York City’s public elementary schools welcomed students back inside their buildings. It wasn’t technically the first day of school—the beginning of the academic year took place remotely—and in many ways it didn’t feel like one. The streets of the East Village, a neighborhood with one of the highest densities of primary schools in the city, would in any other year be a snarl of yellow buses, and sidewalks and schoolyards would reverberate with operatic shouts and shrieks of greeting. This time, by comparison, the activity was sparse and subdued. Parents and caretakers, queuing for drop-off (their times staggered, at most schools, to avoid crowding), stood atop social-distancing markers—yellow lines painted on the pavement outside of one school building, yellow stars at another, blue “X”s of electrical tape on the sidewalk at a third. Kids, masked, greeted their teachers with pantomimed high-fives. Some rushed jubilantly toward their classmates, while others solemnly maintained a perimeter of personal space.

What We’re Buying for the Quarantine

A look into the grocery carts of New Yorkers on the edge of a pandemic.

Plenty of New Yorkers—including health-care providers, delivery couriers, and transportation workers—don’t have the luxury of withdrawing from the public, even if they desire to. One group that’s possibly busier than ever are the employees of the city’s grocery stores, one of the few types of businesses that remain open. At supermarkets across the city, shoppers have thronged the aisles, some anxiously provisioning for weeks of bunkering at home, others simply (and, perhaps, defiantly) going about their normal routines.

New York : Dina Litovsky, Fashion Lust – The Eye of Photography

Beginning January 8th, Anastasia Photo presents Fashion Lust, documentary photographer, Dina Litovsky’s first solo show in the United States. For decades, Fashion Week has been the ultimate, highly exclusive pageant for the fashion aristocracy. Held twice a year in Paris, Milan, New York and London, its visibility has exploded in recent years with the skyrocketing prevalence of digital cameras and fashion blogs—giving the general public access to this previously private event. Through live social media coverage of the runways, the audience at home has become the new front row VIPs.

Last Night to Bend the Rules

Dina Litovsky has been photographing bachelorette parties, where brides-to-be confront the tricky rituals of the last night of single life.

Dina Litovsky, 34, has traveled throughout New York, Philadelphia, Atlantic City and Amsterdam to document brides for her series “Bachelorette,” gaining an inside look at an often private, but highly speculated upon process of a woman’s transition from “Miss” to “Mrs.”