Meditation On The Death Of A Hero

As we walked the streets, I noticed a certain type of photographer that stood in contrast to the sophisticated, mature practioners like Tim or our other luncheon mates, John Stanmeyer, Ami Vitale, David Strick, Jack Picone and others. It seemed to me this group was like a pack of roving jackals. There was a certain aggressive energy, wildness and a willingness to do whatever it takes to get the job done. This subset of photographers spoke about wanting to change the world, but their words sounded somewhat disingenuous. They wanted the thrill of danger, the clarity that comes when Life faces Death; the hunt, the kill. Their giant cameras slung around their necks while strolling around the peaceful streets of this French city were like bazookas, and shooting was an act of aggression for them.

Diversifying with workshops: rewarding but hardly easy

Diversifying with workshops: rewarding but hardly easy | RESOLVE — the liveBooks photo blog:

In the ’90s, Australian photojournalist Jack Picone covered eight wars in ten years. Then, like so many, he recognized that assignments were dwindling and decided to diversify in several areas, especially workshops. Based in Bangkok, Jack brings a non-Western mentality to his workshops, involving local photographers and inviting the community to see the final-night slideshow. Jack’s next workshop, with fellow Australian photographer Stephen Dupont, will be in Sydney and Melbourne in early October and November. But regardless of where they happen, as you’ll see from Jack’s comments, workshops are anything but easy — they are a lot of work for inconsistent money. The big reward is still helping students improve.