The Best of Photojournalism 2014

The National Press Photographers Association’s Best of Photojournalism contest winners were announced Monday. John Tlumacki and Sean Proctor won top honors, and Patrick Smith was named Sports Photographer of the year.

John Tlumacki of The Boston Globe was named the Photojournalist of the Year (Large Markets), and Sean Proctor of the Midland Daily News in Michigan received the Photojournalist of the Year award (Small Markets)

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Our top ten photographs of 2013 celebrate a variety of images from a multitude of photographers, including seasoned photojournalists Tyler Hicks (the Westgate Mall Massacre in Nairobi), Philippe Lopez, (Super Typhoon Haiyan’s destructive wrath upon the Philippines), and John Tlumacki, for his extraordinary coverage of the terror bombing at the Boston Marathon.

Let's Be Professional About This

What we need, what editors should be trying to deliver (and what we got for a brief moment this week) is some photojournalism which harkens back to the Boston Globe of the eighties, and anyone who thinks otherwise deserves to have Stan Grossfeld's non-iro

There’s a big difference between a professional plying their trade and an amateur. In this image I see evidence of two people (in particular) reacting to an unexpected attack, an atrocity, in a professional manner. The first is the officer on the left, who unlike your average celluloid action star, has her finger in the proper position and not on the trigger of her weapon. The second, is photographer John Tlumacki of the Boston Globe who captured THE moment in a straight forward manner without any photo-gizmo trickery.

Tragedy and the Role of Professional Photojournalists

When spectators with cameras were fleeing, they headed towards the madness of the explosion. Tlumacki took his iconic picture just 15 seconds after the first explosion.   Think about this for a moment. At the finish line, there must have been hundreds of cameras. You would think everyone was taking pictures and recording videos. Twitter as a publishing platform is primed and ready for stills and video. It's a world where everyone has a camera. But I saw very few images from the general public.

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LightBox spoke with Boston Globe photographer John Tlumacki, who photographed the explosions at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. Tlumacki, who has photographed more than 20 marathons in his 30 years at the Globe, describes the sheer chaos of the scene: