Tag: Marcus Bleasdale

Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – 7 February, 2020 – Photojournalism Now

This week on Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – the 10th annual Women’s show at Magnet Galleries, Melbourne, plus a review of Dr. Lauren Walsh’s exceptional book, Conversation…

The 76th Annual Overseas Press Club Awards – The Eye of Photography

The 22 award-winning entries for the annual Overseas Press Club Awards depict a world in which entire nations and millions of people have been torn apart by newly intensified forces of nationalism, extremism, disease and environmental degradation. Al Jazeera America, Los Angeles Times and The New York Times won multiple awards. The Robert Capa Gold Medal Award, which honors the best photographic reporting from abroad requiring exceptional courage and enterprise, was presented to Marcus Bleasdale, a global documentary photographer, for his work “Central African Republic Inferno” done on assignment for Human Rights Watch, Foreign Policy and National Geographic Magazine.

Link:
http://www.loeildelaphotographie.com/2015/05/05/awards/27966/the-76th-annual-overseas-press-club-awards

Photography as Advocacy: Origins of a Journey

Sometimes you can pinpoint the exact moment when you decide to change the rest of your life. For photographer Marcus Bleasdale, it happened one London morning in 1998 when he walked into the office where he was working as an investment banker. “Even at that point, I had long known I wouldn’t stay in banking, but that day there was just this trigger,” he recalled. “I didn’t even sit down, and I walked into my boss’s office and resigned.”

Link:
http://proof.nationalgeographic.com/2013/09/24/photography-as-advocacy-origins-of-a-journey/

Marcus Bleasdale’s Zero Hour: From photography to the world of video games

Marcus Bleasdale is always thinking about new ways to highlight the grim living conditions in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and our own complicity in its people's troubles. In 2009, he co-produced a comic book based on his images, and now he's working with a team of games developers to create an immersive experience that will convey the complex reality. He speaks with Olivier Laurent

Link:
http://www.bjp-online.com/british-journal-of-photography/feature/2290573/marcus-bleasdales-zero-hour-from-photography-to-the-world-of-video-games

Photo Essay: Lord's Resistance Army, DR Congo by Marcus Bleasdale

The rebel Lord's Resistance Army and Joseph Kony, its messianic leader, have waged a campaign of massacres, torture, and abduction on civilians across Central Africa since the mid-1980s. Their 20-year bush war against the Ugandan government, which aimed to establish a theocracy based on the Ten Commandments, killed thousands and forced the displacement of around 2 million people.

Link:
http://www.viiphoto.com/showstory.php?nID=1192

Van Houtryve Wins POYi's Freelance Photographer of the Year Award

Photographer Tomas van Houtryve has won POYi's Photographer of the Year award in the freelance/agency category. His portfolio included several critical essays about the social and political effects of entrenched communist regimes in Moldova, Cuba and China. The second place award went to Getty staff photographer Paula Bronstein, while Marcus Bleasdale, a member of VII, won third place.

Link:
http://www.pdnonline.com/pdn/content_display/features/pdn-online/e3i128fcc3d3e64156a049c744f29747d3c

Photo Essay: Kenya, By Marcus Bleasdale

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By Marcus Bleasdale:

The post election violence in Kenya has killed nearly 1,000 and displaced 270,000. It is the most devastating violence to hit Kenya since its independence. Whilst politicians try to find solutions in Nairobi, the ethnic tensions in the Rift Valley reach new highs. Ethnic cleansing has led to killings and houses being burnt in a movement to shift different tribes out of their non-ancestral homes.

Huge parts of different cities across the valleys have been razed to the ground and the inhabitants forced to flee. In the villages, warriors from opposing tribes battle with bows and arrows, rocks and occasionally guns to gain or regain control of their land.

While the politician’s talk, the future of Kenya will depend, not on the final results of the discussions in Nairobi, but on the ability of Kenyans to forgive and live together again. That will take much longer.

Check it out here.