A Three-Volume Book Becomes a Testament to Mary Ellen Mark's Career

The late photographer, who left behind more than two million images, spent her life in search of the elusive iconic frame.

“Mary Ellen would never have made this book,” Martin Bell, Mary Ellen Mark’s husband and collaborator of more than thirty years, writes in an essay accompanying The Book of Everything, the three-volume collection of the photographer’s life’s work recently published by Steidl.

15 Photographers on How Imagination Shapes Their Work

Dawoud Bey, Nan Goldin, KangHee Kim and more reflect on the photograph's potential to influence social and artistic images.

From the Magnum Square Print Sale in Partnership with Aperture, Dawoud Bey, Nan Goldin, KangHee Kim and more reflect on the photograph's potential to influence social and artistic images.

Attitude, by Mary Ellen Mark

Mary Ellen Mark’s subjects often projected an unusual degree of self-confidence. A new exhibit of portraits showcases her intimate relationship to the people she photographed.

Mary Ellen Mark often photographed individuals who, despite being on the fringes of society, projected an unusual degree of self-confidence. They had strong personalities, with a clear sense of self.

The Fearless Gaze of Mary Ellen Mark: A Friend Remembered

Iconic documentary photographer Mary Ellen Mark passed away on Monday, May 25. She was well known for her penetrating work and for the number of photographers’ lives she touched in a myriad of ways. In 1988 she photographed a story for National Geographic

Yes, she was a diva, but she earned every bit of it. Just spend some time with her work. Deep, brilliant, and everlasting.

Mary Ellen Mark, Photographer and Force of Nature

Mary Ellen Mark, a trailblazing documentary photographer, could find the essence of a subject by relying on her passion and drive, keeping things simple but deeply honest.

Melissa Harris, the editor in chief at Aperture, who edited two books with Ms. Mark and was a close friend, described her as “a force of nature” who pushed herself despite her illness. She described Ms. Mark as someone who cared deeply about people and calling attention to injustice. That meant going back often to her subjects, in order to delve deeply into their lives, relying on that connection to give her work a humane touch.

Mary Ellen Mark (1940-2015) in The New Yorker

Mark, who died on Monday, was fierce in her love of photography, and her love extended to the people she worked with.

Her love extended to the people she worked with: to her staff, her subjects, her students, and the other photographers in her life. Loyalty was one of her essential qualities. Once she embraced a person, that person became a part of her life

Mary Ellen Mark, Leica Shooter, Dies at 75 | La Vida Leica!

Those in the Leica circle are no stranger to the name Mary Ellen Mark. It is with great sadness that we must inform our readers that she has passed... She was 75. Time has an article entitled, "In Memoriam: Mary Ellen Mark (1940 – 2015)" that's worth a re

Those in the Leica circle are no stranger to the name Mary Ellen Mark (link is external). It is with great sadness that we must inform our readers that she has passed... She was 75. Time has an article entitled, "In Memoriam: Mary Ellen Mark (1940 – 2015)" (link is external) that's worth a read. She was an avid Leica shooter, owning four Leica cameras - two M4-2s, one M4-P and one M-6 along with five Leitz lenses. She was featured on the Leica blog (link is external) several times and even held appearances (link is external) and workshops (link is external) at Leica stores.

Remembering Iconic Photographer Mary Ellen Mark - Feature Shoot

Back in 2005, when I thought I wanted to be a photographer, I took a few classes at the International Center of Photography (ICP) in NYC. One was a lighting class taught by one of Mary Ellen Mark's previous assistants (who had since moved on to do lightin

Like the rest of the photography community, I’m very saddened to hear of her death today. I didn’t know her personally, but she has always been one of my favorite photographers. And her kindness and complete lack of pretension is something that has always stuck with me and something that I will always remember when I look at her work. RIP MEM.

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Why is it that some photographers take to the studio, while others take to the street? Is street photography photojournalism, art — or both? These are some of the questions raised by Everybody Street, a new documentary chronicling the life and work of 13 of New York’s most renowned street photographers, including Joel Meyerowitz, Bruce Gilden, Mary Ellen Mark, Elliot Erwitt, Jeff Mermelstein, Boogie and Martha Cooper

Mary Ellen Mark

I think what photography can do is open up all sorts of lives for people -- worlds that people couldn't understand. Some of the very dramatic pictures people have done, particularly of wars, the Vietnam war especially (because access was better), made people aware of how horrible it was – for example, the photograph that Eddie Adams took of General Nguyen Ngoc Loan executing a Viet Cong prisoner or the photograph that Nick Ut took of the burned child running down the street -- it's very important to make people aware of what's going on in the world.

LightBox | Time

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For those who don’t know Mary Ellen Mark personally, the notion of one of the world’s premier documentary photographers hosting a Christmas party for dogs might sound downright weird. But for the past decade, Mark has opened the doors of her New York City studio to throngs of canines.

LightBox | Time

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 “I don’t relax,” Mark has said. “I can’t take vacations. I’m obsessive-compulsive and I worry with every project that I’m going to fail. When it starts to go well, and I sense that something beautiful and important and meaningful is being created, it’s a fantastic feeling and I find it very hard to stop.”