15 Photographers on How Imagination Shapes Their Work

Dawoud Bey, Nan Goldin, KangHee Kim and more reflect on the photograph's potential to influence social and artistic images.

From the Magnum Square Print Sale in Partnership with Aperture, Dawoud Bey, Nan Goldin, KangHee Kim and more reflect on the photograph's potential to influence social and artistic images.

Turning Points: Life-Changing Moments by Magnum Photographers - Photographs and texts courtesy of Magnum Photos | LensCulture

From iconic images of major world events, to intimate moments of pleasure and delight — here is an outstanding selection of remarkable images from Magnum Photos — each with a personal story

13 Photographers on Turning Points in Their Work

Elliott Erwitt, Zun Lee, Alec Soth, and more on the turning points in their photographs—from global and national events to the most personal moments.

Turning points in the lives and works of photographers often span the extremes—from global and national events to the most personal moments. Photographers such as Alec Soth and Zun Lee are able to not only bear witness to events that shape our collective history, but also to map more intimate transitions within their craft and their everyday lives.

Magnum Photos Blog

Matt Black’s ongoing project The Geography of Poverty, looks at designated “poverty areas” — with poverty rates of above 20 per cent as defined by the US census—and examines the conditions of powerlessness, prejudice, and pragmatism among America’s poor. Having travelled 100,000 miles across 46 American states—and Puerto Rico—he has found that, rather than being anomalies, these communities are woven into the fabric of the country, as much a reality as the so-called American Dream.

Depicting Poverty: Matt Black Pushes Documentary Photography to its Fullest Range - Reading The Pictures

Creating images that double as fine art, Matt Black is mapping how poverty is a major problem today, now, this minute and every minute. 

We know what poverty looks like: unpainted boards, empty windows and door frames, broken roofing. Or it could be sagging fences and telephone poles, or cracked pavement and graffiti-stained concrete walls. Or faded billboards and backlot signage with their ironic injunctions to “dream” or “save.” Or worn faces and bodies scarred by years of hard labor, want, and worry. Such stark, black and white images of abandonment and desolation have become the iconography of documentary photography. They also were a genuine artistic achievement and a major contribution to public life. If you doubt that, consider what it would have been to see only the sunny faces, gleaming suburbs, and beautiful vistas of commercial advertising.

Depicting Poverty: Matt Black Pushes Documentary Photography to its Fullest Range - Reading The Pictures

Creating images that double as fine art, Matt Black is mapping how poverty is a major problem today, now, this minute and every minute. 

Enter Matt Black, who has been doing really good work to document poverty in the US today. Note that I did not say “compelling” work or “powerful” work; frankly, I am sadly skeptical about the persuasive capacity of documentary photography today, and not because of the photographers. Even if the work does not persuade as it should, however, we need not let the venality and cowardice dominating politics and news media today keep us from learning. And Black has something to teach.

Magnum Gets an Injection of New Talent From Six Photographers | American Photo

This year the organization is considering a record number of new Magnum associates to potentially join their ranks: Matt Black, Carolyn Drake, Sohrab Hura, Lorenzo Meloni, Max Pinckers and Newsha Travakolian. To celebrate the history-making occasion Milk Gallery is currently hosting, Magnum Photos: New Blood, an exhibition that highlights the diverse points of view of each of these photographers.

The Fall of Flint

“You know what my biggest fear is? That people are going to forget about us.”

Photographer Matt Black has profiled over 100 cities across 39 states for his project The Geography of Poverty. He recently went to Flint, Michigan, for The Development Set

W. Eugene Smith Grants Honor Humanistic Photography

In the tradition of W. Eugene Smith, the winners of this year’s prizes have devoted themselves to documenting poverty in the United States, sexual assault in the military and the crisis of a failed state.

Matt Black received this year’s W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography for “The Geography of Poverty,” a project he started in California’s Central Valley where, after giving up his job as a newspaper photographer in the mid-1990s, he spent two decades documenting farming, migration and poverty.

Matt Black Awarded 2015 W. Eugene Smith Grant | American Photo

Photographer Matt Black has been awarded the 2015 W. Eugene Smith grant for his long-term documentary project The Geography of Poverty. Black started the project nearly two decades ago in California's Central Valley, where he grew up, and in 2014 set out on a cross-country trek to document poverty across America. He utilized Instagram to publish the work during his 18,000 mile road trip.

Geography of Poverty | msnbc

Poverty in America is concentrated in counties, regions, urban neighborhoods and reservations. Matt Black and Trymaine Lee document its current state.

This collection of work provides the ultimate retrospective look at a lifetime’s achievement. It includes the first photographs taken by Henri Cartier-Bresson, some of which have never been published, rarely seen work from all periods of his life, and a generous selection of classic photographs that have become icons of the medium.

2015 Magnum Nominees : The Future of Photojournalism – The Eye of Photography

From film-inspired Max Pinckers to war reporter Lorenzo Meloni, from Newsha Tavakolian’s insider’s view to the conceptual work of Richard Moose, from the lyrical Carolyn Drake to the classic approach of Matt Black, the six Magnum nominees for 2015 cover the full range of current documentary trends

Magnum Photos Blog

Michael Christopher Brown has been made an Associate Member Carolyn Drake has been made a Magnum Nominee Matt Black has been made a Magnum Nominee Newsha Tavakolian has been made a Magnum Nominee Max Pinckers has been made a Magnum Nominee Richard Mosse has been made a Magnum Nominee Lorenzo Meloni has been made a Magnum Nominee

Guerrero and the Disappeared

Matt Black’s portraits of life in Mexico’s poorest state since forty-three students went missing.

For years, the photographer Matt Black has been documenting life in impoverished indigenous communities of southern Mexico, for an ongoing project called “The People of Clouds.”

Magnum Foundation Emergency Fund 2015 Grants Announced

The Magnum Foundation Emergency Fund today announces, exclusively through TIME LightBox, the winners of its 2015 grants

This year’s selection of awardees are Massimo Berruti, Matt Black, Peter DiCampo, Emine Gozde Sevim, Curran Hatleberg, Guy Martin, Pete Muller, Elena Perlino, Nii Obodai Provencal, Asim Rafiqui and Peter van Agtmael

Watch almonds suck California dry

Photographer Matt Black highlights the stories behind California's nut boom—in the midst of an epic drought.

Photographer Matt Black highlights the stories behind California's nut boom—in the midst of an epic drought.

PDN Video Pick: Ed Kashi and Matt Black for The New Yorker | PDNPulse

For PDN’s January 2015 print edition, we spoke with photographer Matt Black about the photo essay he made for The New Yorker about the drought in California’s Central Valley. Black, who lives in Exeter, California, has been documenting the valley—which pr

Kashi proposed that he would shoot motion, and Black would shoot stills, and Johnson was quickly on board. Sky Dylan-Robbins, a video producer at The New Yorker, would edit their work into the 7-minute video that ran on newyorker.com.