A Small Voice Podcast – 142 – Michael Christopher Brown

American photographer Michael Christopher Brown was raised in the Skagit Valley, a farming community in Washington. After moving to New York City in 2005, he joined the Italian photo agency Grazia Neri in 2006. He then moved to Beijing, China, in 2009 and over the next two years put together a series of works from road and train trips across the country.

A War Photographer Talks About the Demands of Documenting Conflict

In April of 2011, a bombing in Libya killed photojournalists Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros, and injured Brown. This painful experience is an integral part of his new book, 'Libyan Sugar.'

Michael Christopher Brown's new book, Libyan Sugar, is about the Libyan revolution. Then again, in many ways, it's not. It's about being a photographer and bearing witness to life-changing events. It's about family and the lengths people go to in order to test themselves.

The Realities of a Revolution: The Libyan Crisis

Michael Christopher Brown's "Libyan Sugar" centers around the 2011 Libyan Revolution, detailed through photographs, journal entries, and written communication with family and colleagues. "Libyan Sugar" is a depiction of a youth uprising that quickly becam

Michael Christopher Brown's "Libyan Sugar" centers around the 2011 Libyan Revolution, detailed through photographs, journal entries, and written communication with family and colleagues. "Libyan Sugar" is a depiction of a youth uprising that quickly became a bloody civil war, through the eyes of a young photographer looking to make a difference

Surviving one of photojournalism's darkest moments - CNN

Michael Christopher Brown will never forget the first time he experienced armed conflict. He was documenting the Libyan conflict in 2011 when tragedy struck.

Photographer Michael Christopher Brown traveled by car into Libya with a digital camera in his hand and adventure in his heart. He intended to document an uprising, but as it escalated, he wanted -- no, needed -- to experience armed conflict

Magnum Photos Blog

Michael Christopher Brown has been made an Associate Member Carolyn Drake has been made a Magnum Nominee Matt Black has been made a Magnum Nominee Newsha Tavakolian has been made a Magnum Nominee Max Pinckers has been made a Magnum Nominee Richard Mosse has been made a Magnum Nominee Lorenzo Meloni has been made a Magnum Nominee

In Conversation with Michael Christopher Brown

Filters are a no-no, photobooks are like babies, and Instagram is a numbers-game

Shortly after arriving in Libya to cover the insurrection which would eventually topple Muammar Gaddafi, Brown dropped his camera. He made do as best he could and reported with his iPhone. Soon thereafter, assignments began to arrive requesting, specifically, that he use his phone for the story.

Musings: Michael Christopher Brown in Congo

While working on a project that was a mammoth photo editing task—our Congo story, published on our News site—I came across Michael Christopher Browns’s ironically lovely images from the Congo, taken between 2012 and 2013. The original news story is an 11,000 word piece that dives deep into Congo’s conflicted and violent history, and its strained yet hopeful relationship with the United Nations peacekeeping mission.

Homepage - Michael Christopher Brown

He sat down for a video interview with PDN at the Look3 Festival of the Photograph in Charlottesville, Virginia last month to explain the tools and techniques he uses to capture unguarded moments of everyday people on the streets of Chicago, New York and other cities

Michael Christopher Brown joins Magnum Photos [update]

In a message on Twitter posted earlier today, photographer Michael Christopher Brown has confirmed that he's Magnum Photos' new nominee. 'Proud and honored to be accepted as a nominee this year,' he wrote. In two years' time he will be able to resubmit hi

He sat down for a video interview with PDN at the Look3 Festival of the Photograph in Charlottesville, Virginia last month to explain the tools and techniques he uses to capture unguarded moments of everyday people on the streets of Chicago, New York and other cities

Witness: Libya

Tonight at 9 P.M., HBO is airing “Witness: Libya,” a documentary that follows the war work of the the photographer Michael Christopher Brown. It’s …

Tonight at 9 P.M., HBO is airing “Witness: Libya,” a documentary that follows the war work of the the photographer Michael Christopher Brown.

michael c. brown – the libyan republic

[slidepress gallery=’michaelchristopherbrown_thelybianrepublic’] Hover over the image for navigation and full screen controls  ESSAY CONTAINS EXPLICIT CONTENT EPF 2011 Finalist Mic…

Since arriving in Libya, I have tried to understand the situation. People swap facts, predictions and rumors, but the complexity of the conflict makes it impossible to fully comprehend. Once a picture is taken or a word is written it is already old news. There seems to be no way to catch up, as the database of history is filed before it is processed. And as a result I have become more confused. But I can attest to one reality, shown in these photographs. They form a loose record of my experience during the war in Libya.

LightBox | Time

Read the latest stories about LightBox on Time

“I didn’t go to Libya to cover a war, I went to cover an uprising,” said Brown, who was using an iPhone loaded with the Hipstamatic app after dropping his SLR on one of the first days he was there. “But then it became a war so I followed it, because that’s where the story was moving.”

michael c. brown – libya

[slidepress gallery=’michaelchristopherbrown_lybia’] Hover over the image for navigation and full screen controls ESSAY CONTAINS EXPLICIT CONTENT Michael Christopher Brown Libya play th…

Since arriving ten days ago, I have tried to understand the situation here in Libya. People swap facts, predictions and rumors, the news feeds me information, but the complexity of the conflict makes it impossible to fully comprehend. Once a picture is taken or a word is written it is already old news. There seems to be no way to catch up, as the database of history is filed before it is processed. And as a result I have become more confused. But I can attest to one reality, shown in these photographs. They form a loose record of my experience during the war in Libya.

michael christopher brown – sakhalin [EPF Finalist]

burn.jpg

burn magazine says:

Photographed predominantly in the broken, rusted, skeletons of communities around Sakhalin Island, Russia, these images explore the wintry atmosphere of a remote land and its people, long scarred from the Soviet era and left behind in modern times.