Tag: Rebecca Norris Webb

  • Waves: Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb – LENSCRATCH

    Waves: Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb - LENSCRATCH

    Waves: Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb – LENSCRATCH

    Waves (Radius Books 2022) by creative partners Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb includes photographs and text that navigate the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. These photographs were captured by Alex and Rebecca in Cape Cod, Massachusetts from March 2020 through May 2021. Alex captured photographs of the expansive seascapes near his childhood town of

    via LENSCRATCH: http://lenscratch.com/2022/09/waves-alex-webb-and-rebecca-norris-webb/

    Many people were able to take advantage of the strange time and embrace nature. Yet there were those who couldn’t leave their homes, required to stay indoors. The photographs and poems in Waves illuminate this time with two voices, traversing the naturally occurring shifts within nature and home.

  • Text + Image: Rebecca Norris Webb: Night Calls – LENSCRATCH

    http://lenscratch.com/2021/07/rebecca-norris-wells-night-calls/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+lenscratch%2FZAbG+%28L++E++N++S++C++R++A++T++C++H%29
    Awash with lush, rich imagery and poetic text, Rebecca Norris Webb’s book Night Calls, published by Radius Books, is a gorgeous homage to her 99-year old physician father and to Rush County, Indiana – the small, rural county where both were born and raised. Photographed mostly at night and in the early morning, Rebecca mirrored her father’s work patterns, as he was often called to patients during the twilight hours. Accompanying her imagery of liminal stillness, landscapes of disorienting beauty and hints of decay, and portraits of former patients are her hand-written musings; bittersweet recollections of history and family ties, and deeper questions she poses directly to her father:
  • Blind – Retracing the Route of a Country Doctor in Rural Indiana

    Retracing the Route of a Country Doctor in Rural Indiana
    Inspired by the iconic work of W. Eugene Smith, Rebecca Norris Webb traces the route of her father, a country doctor, in the new book Night Calls.
  • Rebecca Norris Webb Night Calls – AMERICAN SUBURB X

    Rebecca Norris Webb Night Calls
    The sycamores I understand, each scale of their weathered bark is fit for a peelin’ from childish hands. Perhaps here and there a jackknife scratches into the tree skin an overture of young love. A rusted nail once precariously an iron protuberance is now enveloped by the same bark and it is sinking into the torso of the green and brown sycamore.  The nail’s head now reminds me of an awkward bellybutton as the skin of the tree stretches to accommodate its mass before the tree’s invisible maw can work its iron victim from sight. It is a slow process and the casual observation of the sinking nail will give little up to the viewer, but over time and over repeat returns, the nail’s “progress” can be seen as a testament to the march of all things.
  • Juxtapoz Magazine – Rebecca Norris Webb’s Night Calls

    https://www.juxtapoz.com/news/photography/rebecca-norris-webb-s-night-calls/
    Studying at the International Center of Photography in New York, Rebecca Norris Webb first came across W. Eugene Smith’s “Country Doctor,” his famous Life magazine photo essay. Webb was immediately drawn to the subject of Smith’s essay, Dr. Ernest Ceriani, a Colorado country doctor who was just a few years older than her father. She wondered: How would a woman tell this story, especially if she happened to be the doctor’s daughter?
  • 15 Photographers on How Imagination Shapes Their Work – Aperture

    15 Photographers on How Imagination Shapes Their Work
    From the Magnum Square Print Sale in Partnership with Aperture, Dawoud Bey, Nan Goldin, KangHee Kim and more reflect on the photograph’s potential to influence social and artistic images.
  • Redefining Street Photography with Alex and Rebecca Norris Webb – Photographs by Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb | Interview by Cat Lachowskyj | LensCulture

    https://www.lensculture.com/articles/rebecca-norris-and-alex-webb-redefining-street-photography-with-alex-and-rebecca-norris-webb
    Photography duo Alex and Rebecca Norris Webb offer insight into the evolution of their practice, and why the genre of street photography isn’t so easy to define.
  • A Photographic Duet Inspired by the Glittering “Violet Isle” of the Caribbean – Feature Shoot

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    A Photographic Duet Inspired by the Glittering “Violet Isle” of the Caribbean – Feature Shoot

    Over a period of 15 years, American photographers Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb made 11 trips to Cuba, each drawn to difference elements of this multi-faceted gem. Alex Webb explored the country’s street life, capturing scenes of everyday life set in a prism of vivid colors that glow under the Caribbean sun, while Rebecca Norris Webb was drawn to the resounding presence of animal life, photographing tiny zoos, pigeon societies, and personal menageries.

  • A Marriage of Lives and Photos – The New York Times

    [contentcards url=”https://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2017/08/29/a-marriage-of-lives-and-photos/?module=BlogPost-Title&version=Blog%20Main&contentCollection=Multimedia&action=Click&pgtype=Blogs&region=Body”]

    A Marriage of Lives and Photos – The New York Times

    The photographers Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb have produced a book, “Slant Rhymes,” that pairs images by each of them in diptychs. In an email exchange with James Estrin, they discussed the book, photography and their relationship.

  • Juxtapoz Magazine – “My Dakota: Photographs by Rebecca Norris Webb” @ The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland

    “My Dakota: Photographs by Rebecca Norris Webb” @ The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland

    “They say your first death is like your first love—and you’re never quite the same afterwards,” says Rebecca Norris Webb. The artist, who has long lived in New York City, embarked in 2005 to photograph her home state of South Dakota. After one of her brothers unexpectedly died the following year, her images began to change. Tones became more muted and delicate, the palette more autumnal

  • Dialogues: 36 Photographs & 20 Poems – The Eye of Photography

    Dialogues: 36 Photographs & 20 Poems

    Dialogues: 36 Photographs & 20 Poems is a new publication from 205-A and the first book in a series that explores the intersection between photography and poetry. The publishers, Aaron Stern and Jordan Sullivan worked in collaboration with poets Tom Sleigh and Will Schutt to bring together these unique pairings. The book features the photography of Ed van der Elsken, Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb, Alain Laboile, Emma Phillips, Mark Borthwick, Brian Merriam, Coley Brown, Jordan Sullivan and Aaron Stern. 

  • In Kodak’s Hometown, Memory and History

    20140623 lens webb slide W5EF blog480In Kodak’s Hometown, Memory and History

    Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb, a husband and wife photography team, documented Rochester after Eastman Kodak’s bankruptcy in their new book, “Memory City,” published by Radius Books. Their conversation with James Estrin has been edited.

  • Rebecca Norris Webb’s “My Dakota”

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    Link: Rebecca Norris Webb’s “My Dakota” – NYTimes.com

    It’s taken me much of life to understand and accept that my images are wiser than I am. It often takes me weeks and sometimes months to understand what they are trying to say to me.

  • Rebecca Norris Webb: ‘My Dakota’

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    Link: Rebecca Norris Webb: ‘My Dakota’ – LightBox

    Looking again at the work now that My Dakota is finally a book, I realize that I was photographing this particularly dark time in my life in order to try to absorb it, to distill it, and, ultimately, to let it go. Not only did my first grief change me, but making My Dakota changed me as well, both as a human being and as a bookmaker.

  • Alex Webb Rebecca Norris Webb

  • 'Violet Isle': Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb on their new photography book | RESOLVE

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    Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb are both photographers. They also happen to be married to one another. Alex, a member of Magnum Photos, is known for his lyrical street photography, collected in books including Istanbul, Crossings, and Amazon. Rebecca published her first photography book, The Glass Between Us: Reflections of Urban Creatures, in 2006 to wide acclaim. Just this month they released their first photo book together, Violet Isle, which explores Cuba through both their cameras, seen more clearly, in a way, from two different angles. (Not surprisingly, their joint blog is called “Two Looks.”)

    Link: ‘Violet Isle’: Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb on their new photography book | RESOLVE — the liveBooks photo blog
  • alex webb & rebecca norris webb – violet isle | burn magazine

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    Link: alex webb & rebecca norris webb – violet isle | burn magazine:

    (1) Both of you have heretofore been solo artists. What sacrifices did you make and/or what benefits are there to a collaboration? AW: From my perspective, the sacrifices were not great. Early on working in Cuba, I envisioned doing my own book, but I also wanted to do something different  –– something unlike any of my past books, as well as something different from any of the many past photographic books on Cuba. When Rebecca and I hit upon the notion of combining our work, this resolved these concerns of mine. I also found it very exciting to weave our two distinct bodies of work together to create a different kind of portrait of the island. In fact, I am more excited about this book than any other book of mine since Hot Light/Half-Made Worlds, my first book, which came out in 1986. RNW:  I was initially concerned that my fascination with Cuba was taking valuable time away from a project that I had always thought would be my second book, My Dakota, a project that had started out as an exploration of my relationship with the West––and specifically my home state of South Dakota––and ended up also becoming an elegy for my brother, Dave.  Now, I realize that bringing out the Cuba book before My Dakota was the right decision.  I needed more time and distance from my brother’s death to absorb and distill and let go of My Dakota.