Beyond the Myth of the War Photographer

In “Shooting War,” the psychiatrist Anthony Feinstein explores the complexity of photographers’ day-to-day work covering conflict and human depravity.

The psychiatrist Anthony Feinstein explores this complexity in his book, “Shooting War” (Glitterati Editions). Starting with a single, striking image from each photographer, Dr. Feinstein profiles 18 conflict photographers, including Don McCullin, Tim Hetherington and Corinne Dufka, and examines their motivations, traumas, and, most important, their resilience.

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The Last Patrol, Sebastian Junger’s third and final chapter in a trilogy of films about war and its devastating effects on soldiers, came to fruition after he and documentary photographer Tim Hetherington made plans to walk from Washington D.C. to New York City along railroad lines.

Tim Hetherington: Portraits of the blind

In these photographs, Tim Hetherington takes a look at the eyes of those who cannot see. From 1999 to 2003, the late photographer visited the Milton Margai School for the Blind in Sierra Leone. Most of these sightless children were victims of the civil war, which began in 1991. Some were mutilated by rebel fighters while others were blinded by shrapnel.

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“War gives you meaning,” he said, “an appreciation of life, and a chemical rush.  That’s good. If anything else gave you all that, I’d be doing it every day. War is giving you these things that everyone seeks and presents it in a package. You never get those three things together in anything else. You can go skydiving but that’s not meaningful, it’s just an indulgence. War is everything.”

New Movie Explores Life and Work of Tim Hetherington Through His Family and Friends | PDNPulse

There’s a long moment of dread near the beginning of Sebastian Junger’s new film about the life and death of Tim Hetherington. A video camera pans around a car full of journalists covering the uprising in Libya in April 2011. Hetherington and Chris Hondro

There’s a long moment of dread near the beginning of Sebastian Junger’s new film about the life and death of Tim Hetherington. A video camera pans around a car full of journalists covering the uprising in Libya in April 2011. Hetherington and Chris Hondros are among them. As the car sets off through war-ravaged streets, Hetherington can be overheard asking, “Which way is the front line from here?”

Tim Hetherington, Indelible on Film

A new documentary by Sebastian Junger explores the life and work of his friend and colleague Tim Hetherington.

“When people came in for Tim’s memorial in New York in May 2011, some were journalists who’d been with Tim during the attack,” Sebastian said in a recent interview. “So I just thought I wanted to talk to them, interview them about what had happened.” Soon, his exploration of Tim’s death, and life, turned into a full-length documentary, “Which Way Is the Frontline From Here: The Life and Times of Tim Hetherington.” Backed by HBO, which also bankrolled “Restrepo,” it will run on April 18, two days before the second anniversary of Tim’s death.

Inside the War Machine: New Documentary Maps an Epic Photo Career

Tim Hetherington is trying to explain why he documents war. He launches into a cliché about violence and the "human experience" but quickly stops, laughs and says, "No, that sounds too fucking bullshit." It's the opening scene from HBO's new documentary a

It’s the opening scene from HBO’s new documentary about Hetherington called Which Way Is the Front Line From Here? The Life and Time of Tim Hetherington. The film, which airs April 18, is a posthumous recounting of one of the most impressive photojournalism careers to date, directed by one of Hetherington’s close colleagues, Sebastian Junger.

Guy Martin, CJ Chivers Give Testimony in Inquest Into Tim Hetherington’s Death | PDNPulse

The Coroner’s Court in Westminster, UK, carrying out an inquest into the death of photographer Tim Hetherington concluded that his death was “unlawful,” The Independent reports.  The photojournalist and documentary-film maker died April 20, 2011 in a mort

chilling reading for anyone who knew the two slain photographers

The life and death of Tim Hetherington

When Sebastian Junger began to piece together the last hours of photographer killed in Libya, it led to him making a film about his friend's life.

When Sebastian Junger began to piece together the last hours of a photographer killed in Libya, it led him to make a film about his friend's life, a work which receives its world premiere on Sunday.

Sebastian Junger's Tim Hetherington Doc to Premiere at Sundance | PDNPulse

“Which Way is the Front Line from Here? The Life and Time of Tim Hetherington,” Sebastian Junger’s documentary about the life and work of his friend and colleague, the award-winning photographer, will premiere at the Sundance Film Festival in January in P

Vice photographer Robert King apparently lied on his Facebook page and Twitter in order to protect McAfee. Like McAfee, he claimed that the geodata in the photo had been manipulated to conceal their true location. This explanation, of course, made no damn sense at all. If McAfee and King were trying to conceal their location by spreading disinformation, why immediately admit to it?

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A new book, Photographs Not Taken, conceived and edited by photographer Will Steacy compiles personal essays written by more than 60 photographers about a time when they didn’t or just couldn’t use their camera.

Tim Hetherington’s legacy: A mother’s perspective on her son’s war photography

Judith Hetherington talks about her son’s legacy on the eve of his first major posthumous solo exhibition.Judith Hetherington talks about her son’s legacy on the eve of his first major posthumous solo exhibition.Judith Hetherington talks about her son’s l

“I didn’t really worry,” Judith Hetherington, mother of “Restrepo” co-director Tim Hetherington said. “I didn’t because I don’t think we can do anything about it. Tim had chosen his path.” In nine days, it will be the one-year anniversary of his death in Libya. Thursday will be the opening of his first posthumous solo exhibition.

Tim Hetherington’s last photos

Magnum, who now distribute Tim Hetherington’s work (not without controversy), have just made available in their archive The Libya Negs: Tim Hetherington’s Last Images. Included in the selection is an image captioned “LIBYA. Misurata. April 20, 2011. Tim’s last photograph.”