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Life in Miami on the Knife’s Edge of Climate Change | The New Yorker

When a hurricane approaches, the air tingles. The sea does strange things. In minutes, the sky can turn from azure blue to slate gray. Turbulence comes out of nowhere. You can picture what follows, and many photographers do, but you will find no images of catastrophe in Anastasia Samoylova’s “FloodZone.” She is looking for other things, the subtler signs of what awaits the populations that cluster along shorelines. What is it to live day by day on a climatic knife’s edge? What psychological state does it demand? Hurricanes are sudden and violent; sea-level rise is insidious and creeping. The low-level dread of slow change, and the shock of sudden extremes. Climate and weather.

Life in Miami on the Knife’s Edge of Climate Change | The New Yorker

When a hurricane approaches, the air tingles. The sea does strange things. In minutes, the sky can turn from azure blue to slate gray. Turbulence comes out of nowhere. You can picture what follows, and many photographers do, but you will find no images of catastrophe in Anastasia Samoylova’s “FloodZone.” She is looking for other things, the subtler signs of what awaits the populations that cluster along shorelines. What is it to live day by day on a climatic knife’s edge? What psychological state does it demand? Hurricanes are sudden and violent; sea-level rise is insidious and creeping. The low-level dread of slow change, and the shock of sudden extremes. Climate and weather.

Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – 16 August 2019 – Photojournalism Now

This week on Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – a review of Kevin Bubriski‘s new book Legacy in Stone: Syria Before War. Plus don’t forget the Contemporary Centre for Photography‘s inaugural Photo Fair is on this weekend in Melbourne.

Deconstructing the Visual Language of Group Photography – Feature Shoot

In Amonth Others: Photography and the Group, now on view at The Morgan Library & Museum in New York through August 18, 2019, Joel Smith, the Morgan’s Richard L. Menschel Curator brings together more than 60 works from the 1860s through the present that explore that which we have long taken for granted as a photographic archetype.

A personal journey through modern Iraqi Kurdistan

Photojournalist Sebastian Meyer weaves his documentary photography of a conflicted region with his own heartbreaking journey of friendship and loss.

Juxtapoz Magazine – Marco Marzocchi Reevaluates His Whole Family History in New Book

Marco Marzocchi’s photography is the search for people, atmospheres and places of the past that mix with the present in order to define it and make sense of it. It is beauty in everyday simplicity and in those small details that hide joy, fear, or pain, elements that combine like in a poem. His work alternates impulsiveness and rationality, both in shooting and editing. But nothing is casual. Everything is traced back to a narrative that is both introspective and open to the outside world. A succession of questions and answers and yet more questions, to give meaning to deep dynamics, to facts from the past, to love, to photography itself.

Margeaux Walter – Believe Me « burn magazine

As I navigate a world of surveillance cameras, drones, social media, “smart” phones, and facial recognition software, I find myself in a constant struggle with both visibility and invisibility. Anonymity is becoming harder, yet so is being seen. “Believe Me,” a title inspired by Trump’s most frequently used two-word phrase, is a series of photographs resembling surveillance images that one might find in Google Earth.

Scenes from A Pivotal Era in the Gentrification of Miami Beach – Feature Shoot

British photographer and filmmaker Barry Lewis was in the mix, documenting the early years of gentrification in his new book Miami Beach 1988-1995 (Hoxton Mini Press). His photographs bring us back to a pivotal time in the city’s history, when the power brokers were able to capitalize on a community profoundly devastated, and begin to erase them from what little they were able to retain.

Manmade Patterns and Uncanny Shadows Photographed From Above by JP and Mike Andrews | Colossal

U.K.-based brothers JP and Mike Andrews began taking aerial photographs of the Earth after a year-long trip experiencing the incredible landscapes found in the Australian Outback. Using a drone, the pair have continued to capture natural and manmade scenes across the world, stumbling upon unique patterns that can only be discerned from above. JP and Mike are attracted to sights that exemplify how “weird and wonderful the world can look from above,” such as the shadow from a cargo ship imitating the shape of a city skyline, or a loaded parking lot creating a dense fabric of interlocking lines.

Hubert Barre – Le Quartier St. Antoine « burn magazine

Ah matočka, they are really poor! And what a mess! But it is hardly surprising: the whole family lives in a single room, divided by small screens, for their decency.

“Food is the new rock’n’roll”! We interviewed legendary music photographer and cook extraordinaire, Kerstin Rodgers – Feature Shoot

If you like music, it’s very likely that you’ve seen the work of Kerstin Rodgers, one of the prime documentarians of the punk scene in London and one of the most influential rock’n’roll photographers of all time.

Juxtapoz Magazine – Taken From Memory: 25 Years of Photographs by Sheron Rupp

Taken From Memory is the result of a 25-year long-time project by American photographer Sheron Rupp. Searching for connections to her own biographical past, Rupp took these photographs in rural America looking to find a piece of someone elses life to give her a sense of belonging.

Denis Defibaugh: North by Nuuk, Greenland after Kent | LENSCRATCH

Projects featured over the next several days were selected from our most recent call-for-submissions. I was able to interview each of these individuals to gain further insight into the bodies of work they shared. Today, we are looking at the series North by Nuuk, Greenland after Kent, by Denis Defibaugh.

Steve Davis – Pride in America

Pride in America is a loose-knit series of images taken from the mid 1970’s to the mid 1980’s. Most of the images were created in northern Idaho by a young man bent on chronicling his friends and events.  We were the Idaho punk pioneers, or so we thought.  We have mostly gone our own ways since then.  The initial impetus of this series was for no reason other than to share with some of the subjects captured, but I hope others might relate to the people and era I present in this work.

Hannes Jung – How is life? « burn magazine

My story “How is Life?” is not just about photography. I worked together with the protagonists and asked them to write down their personal story. These statements (see the captions) are an essential part of this project.

I photograph life not death because death cannot be seen. Maybe you can’t take pictures of the wind. But you could try to catch the consequences of the wind, bending trees and rolling waves.

Juxtapoz Magazine – Interview: Shane Lavalette’s Photographic Journey Across Switzerland

American photographer Shane Lavalettes latest project, Still (Noon), is a photographic journey across Switzerland and meditation on history and the transformative power of time. Invited to participate in a group exhibition titled “Unfamiliar Familiarities. Outside Views on Switzerland,” Lavalette dove into the archives of Swiss photographer Theo Frey (1908-1997), uncovering unexpected connections with his own work and ultimately using a 1939 journey of Freys as a starting point for his project. Travelling to the same twelve villages that Frey did, he found himself reflecting on the constantly evolving meaning of photographs. “I considered the ways in which Freys photographs have different implications now than the day that they were made,” Lavalette explains, “and how the meaning of my own images will undoubtedly transform with age as well. Photographs, I realized, are much like mountains. Though we think of images as fixed and still, what we see in them is always shifting, however slowly, with time.”

A journey to the frontlines of the fight for animal rights – Feature Shoot

The photojournalist Aitor Garmendia stands outside a farm in Italy, accompanied by investigators from the animal rights group Essere Animali. Inside, there are thousands of pigs, all bred and raised for meat. It’s the dead of night. All is silent. There are guards inside. “You have one minute,” the investigation coordinator tells Garmendia. He slips inside, turns on the light, and photographs what he sees.

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