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American Fraternity: An Illustrated Manual by Andrew Moisey | LENSCRATCH

When I first saw the book, American Fraternity, published by Daylight Books, I was intrigued by its beautiful old-fashioned, shiny leather cover. It looked like one of those books you find at your grandfather’s house, a precious object. Inside, I found black and white photos, printed on yellow pages, with images that are crude, and powerful, combined with excerpts of pledges, prayers and vows taken from an actual ritual fraternity manual that Andrew Moisey found on the ground after the fraternity was closed down.

Juxtapoz Magazine – Photography From The Fringe at House of Machines in LA

This weekend in Los Angeles, Iqvinder Singh has curated a group of photographers that capture life on the fringes, from gangs and cock fights to train hopping and trips to the desert, in an exhibition titled Outsiders Photography. The show is at House of Machines on the outer edges of LA’s Arts District. The show runs from 7-10pm, but honestly, who knows how late it’ll go…. check out the flyer and some of the work from the show below.

50 Years After Altamont: The End of the 1960s – The New York Times

The concert was featured in the documentary film “Gimme Shelter,” and a few photojournalists captured the experience. Among them was Bill Owens, who would soon rise to photographic fame for his seminal early 1970s project “Suburbia,” which cheekily documented the rise of the suburbs in California.

Jordan Gale: It Is What It Is | LENSCRATCH

In 2017, we featured the work of Jordan Gale as one of the Honorable Mention nods for the Lenscratch Student Award. I was moved by his work and it has stayed with me over the past two years. Jordan has an innate ability to tell stories, in particular his own–of family, poverty, and drug abuse. His insightful photographs and honest narration of what he has learned from who he was and where he came from is an amazing tribute to a young photographer. His images are dark, jittery, and truthful, perfectly capturing life on the edge.

Harvey Stein: Mexico Between Life and Death | LENSCRATCH

This is how Harvey Stein has come to know Mexico. Over the course of his fourteen trips there between 1993 and 2010, Stein captured the vibrancy of public ritual and myth in city streets as well as intimate moments of joy, irony, and grief. His photographs are presented in a new book titled Mexico Between Life and Death, published by Kehrer Verlag. The images in the book appear as small vignettes within the whole, as Stein seeks to inspect the many aspects of Mexican culture as it relates to death, religion, and myth. We see masks, dogs, children, expressions of affection or despair, dancing, and grieving – all a part of the celebration of death in Mexico not as an end to something, but a spoke in the wheel of life.

Magical Photos of Childhood Summers in a Small Austrian Village – Feature Shoot

In her project I am Waldviertel, Dutch photographer Carla Kogelman travels to the Austrian region of Waldviertel to the small village of Merkenbrechts, population less than 200. Here, Kogelman transports us into an eternal moment of fleeting childhood summers, a moment where time eclipses in that it is both fast with outdoor adventure, and slow with restless boredom—imagination and play often being its only respite.

A Mexican Photographer Explores the Enduring Bonds of Her Indigenous Culture – The New York Times

Among the indigenous people from Yalálag in Mexico’s Oaxaca state, these ties bind them to one another, no matter where they may have migrated in search of opportunity. Citlali Fabián’s parents hailed from there, moved to Mexico City, and returned to Oaxaca City, which is 90 grueling kilometers away from Yalálag. But no matter where Ms. Fabián lived, her heritage kept her — and others — close to the cradle of her people, who descended from the Zapotecs.

A Mexican Photographer Explores the Enduring Bonds of Her Indigenous Culture – The New York Times

Among the indigenous people from Yalálag in Mexico’s Oaxaca state, these ties bind them to one another, no matter where they may have migrated in search of opportunity. Citlali Fabián’s parents hailed from there, moved to Mexico City, and returned to Oaxaca City, which is 90 grueling kilometers away from Yalálag. But no matter where Ms. Fabián lived, her heritage kept her — and others — close to the cradle of her people, who descended from the Zapotecs.

A Mexican Photographer Explores the Enduring Bonds of Her Indigenous Culture – The New York Times

Among the indigenous people from Yalálag in Mexico’s Oaxaca state, these ties bind them to one another, no matter where they may have migrated in search of opportunity. Citlali Fabián’s parents hailed from there, moved to Mexico City, and returned to Oaxaca City, which is 90 grueling kilometers away from Yalálag. But no matter where Ms. Fabián lived, her heritage kept her — and others — close to the cradle of her people, who descended from the Zapotecs.

Clay Maxwell Jordan: Nothing’s Coming Soon | LENSCRATCH

Clay Maxwell Jordan, photographer and musician, has a new monograph, Nothing’s Coming Soon, published by Fall Line Press. The photographs of the American South were inspired by the Buddhist belief that “life is suffering” and a place where grace and beauty is juxtaposed with loss and decay.  The book is “a poetic, existential meditation on the human condition”and includes an essay by eminent photography critic and chair of Stanford University Department of Art, Alexander Nemerov.

Dmitry Markov: #DRAFT #RUSSIA

“They are not just ‘social photographs,’ as many people see them, they are my personal encounters and scenes. Every added picture is another chapter of my own history. And when I am asked why I go after ‘life’s unpleasant side,’ I reply, ‘because I am a part of it.’” – Dmitry Markov, 2017

Photos of Lesbian Lives Meant to Inspire a Movement – The New York Times

Joan E. Biren began to photograph at a time when it was almost impossible to find authentic images of lesbians and aimed to help build a movement for their liberation.

After ISIS: Photographing the Ruins of Raqqa and Mosul | Time

Homes make a city. More than buildings, roads, schools, markets, hospitals and shops, it’s homes and the people who live in them that create the life of a place. The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria conquered Raqqa, which it named its first capital, and eventually the Iraqi city of Mosul, where it declared its caliphate, in order to control millions of those lives. Between these twin capitals, ISIS militants ruled with a level of cruelty and madness almost unknown in our time.

After ISIS: Photographing the Ruins of Raqqa and Mosul | Time

Homes make a city. More than buildings, roads, schools, markets, hospitals and shops, it’s homes and the people who live in them that create the life of a place. The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria conquered Raqqa, which it named its first capital, and eventually the Iraqi city of Mosul, where it declared its caliphate, in order to control millions of those lives. Between these twin capitals, ISIS militants ruled with a level of cruelty and madness almost unknown in our time.

What if Mexico Still Included California, Nevada and Texas? – The New York Times

Tomas van Houtryve followed Mexico’s long-forgotten northern boundary to meet families who have lived in the region, now forming part of the United States, for centuries.

Two years on: a photographic tribute to Standing Rock

Photographer Ryan Vizzions looks back on one of the largest protest movements in American history: what’s changed since, and what he hopes will come next.

Garie Waltzer: The States Project: Ohio | LENSCRATCH

Garie Waltzer’s personal evolution as a photographer in some ways mirrors the wildly radical transformation of the medium itself during the past 50 years. After working as a painter as an undergraduate student, she embraced analog photography; later, she described her relationship to the medium as being “infused with a love of process and materials” and her work as straddling “the boundaries of what was considered ‘photographic.’” Waltzer was an early adopter of digital imaging, working with scanners and Apple computers in the 1980s; she combined digital output from imaging machines intended for business applications with drawing and other expressive techniques to create large-scale color electrostatic collages. Her hybrid use of imaging technologies and painterly strategies continued throughout the 1990s and into the early 2000s. But, just when, as she describes it, “the avalanche of digital work” revolutionized photography, Waltzer took a hiatus – and when she returned to photography, she came back to the analog world.

Juxtapoz Magazine – From Mail Art to Memes: SFMOMA’s “snap + share”

If sharing is caring, we are a very invested species. In the center of SFMOMAs snap+share exhibit, a landslide of glossy photos, the physical manifestation of pictures uploaded on a sharing site in a single, cascade from the walls. Filling the room like high tide, Erik Kessels installation is what Senior Curator Clement Cheroux calls a “massification” of images. Impossible to walk through without lingering over a photo amid the peaks and valleys of images, the piece overwhelms, amuses and gives pause.

Finding Fraternity and Politics in Algerian Soccer – The New York Times

The sport is so popular in the North African nation and the region, that it’s been given the Marxist treatment: “We call it the opium of the people,” Fethi Sahraoui said. Since 2015, Mr. Sahraoui has photographed roughly 30 games in his hometown, Mascara, and in neighboring Relizane. The result is “Stadiumphilia.”

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