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Examining Identity, Race and Responsibility Among White South Africans – The New York Times

Sydelle Willow Smith’s photos tease out the complexities of her white South African compatriots, who grapple with the question of national origin.

Juan Pablo Bellandi – The Tale Nobody Tells « burn magazine

My job as a Photographer of the pólice in Venezuela for more than two years has taught me through crude lessons to see myself as a policeman, with the particularity that I possess a camera.

Fashioning the Feminine Ideal in the Photos of Martine Gutierrez – Feature Shoot

Martine Gutierrez is a star, restoring performance art to its rightful place in the pantheon. As artist and muse, Gutierrez uses film and photography as a medium uses a crystal ball, gazing into the vast unknowable realm until an image occurs — a lyrical poem, a visual ode to the mellifluous construction of the feminine as a look, a lifestyle, and the glorious manifestation of luminous artifice.

Blue Earth Alliance: Richard Street: Knife Fight City and the Kingdom of Dust | LENSCRATCH

A hard-luck story from a hard-luck place, Richard Street’s “Knife Fight City and the Kingdom of Dust” takes us to Huron, the poorest town in California. Direct on-camera flash lends a Weegee-like aesthetic to desperate scenes of migrant men running afoul of the law, or a rival gang, or their own worst impulses. See a close overhead shot of EMTs resuscitating one field hand overdosing on black tar heroin, or of a different field hand being dragged kicking and screaming into a drunk tank by a police sergeant, the hand-to-hand human contact forming a perverse visual counterpoint of the Sistine Chapel ceiling. But Street aligns himself more pointedly with the empathetic tradition of Dorothea Lange, following immigrant agricultural workers after their workday to a lonely gully wilderness where they eke out an existence on the bank of a ditch, tending to their hand-built homes of cardboard and corrugated metal under a California sun. —Thomas Patterson

This City Is an Overcrowded, Illogical, Inhospitable Marvel – The New York Times

A generation before Kouwenhoven, Berenice Abbott captured this heathen beauty in a portfolio of photographs she called “Changing New York,” which was exhibited at the Museum of the City of New York in 1937. Her city is not a nesting ground for the people who lived there but a rivalry of individual egos craning to fill the horizon with their concrete and glass. If people live there, it is only because the buildings have not yet had time to crowd them out.

Blue Earth Alliance: Tim Matsui: Leaving the Life | LENSCRATCH

One of the remarkable aspects of Tim Matsui’s “Leaving the Life” is the work he’s done to make sure that the project is more than an affecting, well-told story. For Matsui, creating an award-winning documentary film was just the beginning. He ran a successful Kickstarter campaign to raise money to produce DVDs that he could use in his grassroots outreach. And he has helped aid and educate policymakers and others who are working to end sex trafficking of minors. Matsui pushes us to expand our thinking about the role visual storytellers can play in contemporary society. A longtime partner of Blue Earth, Matsui is currently fundraising for a follow-up film about the culture and politics creating the demand for sex buying.

Dave Heath: A Master of Photographing Solitude – The New York Times

In Dave Heath’s vision, even the smushed faces of young lovers smooching is a picture of loneliness and alienation. The woman’s eyes are slightly open, not meeting the gaze of her partner, whose head is tilted so far their faces misalign. The uncertain promise of intimacy and connection is revealed in a frame made so close one imagines kisser and kissee must have flinched when the shutter clicked.

Looking at San Francisco Through Hamburger Eyes – Feature Shoot

Back in 2001, brothers Ray and David Potes were putting out photo zines the old fashioned way. Ray would edit and art direct while Dave ran copies while working in a college copy department. The one titled Hamburger Eyes really stood out — and began attracting photographers who wanted to share their work.

Ignacio Colo – At the Same Time « burn magazine

Eduardo and Miguel Portnoy are two 50-year-old twins from Buenos Aires, Argentina. They live together, they have never been apart since they were born, and today they are all alone in this world. Their family passed away with time: their parents, their only brother, also their uncles. They don’t have any close friends. They do everything alone. But they are never alone, because they have each other. The only support they have, their last safety net, is the Jewish community, that gives them employment, helping them materially but also, to a certain extent, emotionally. But, all in all, their main support is the love they have for each other and that symbiosis so typical of twins. The two of them are their only shelter, built upon love, loneliness and vulnerability.

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Días Eternos – The Leica camera Blog

Venezuelan photographer Ana María Arévalo spent a long time living abroad. When she returned to her homeland in 2017, she found a country in a deep state of crisis. She began her Días Eternos series by photographing women being held in detention centres. Many of them have been imprisoned arbitrarily and languish there for months or even years before coming to trial. For Arévalo, the image of the inhuman conditions these women experience while they wait, was a reflection of the crisis in Venezuela. We spoke with the photographer about closeness, respect and the advantages of the Leica Q, an inconspicuous, quiet camera.

A Photographer Confronts His Family’s Tragic Past in Colombia’s War – The New York Times

Colombia’s bloody conflict left Andres Cardona an orphan. After years of covering how political violence devastated others, he now looks at how it changed his life forever.

The 2019 Ordinary Animals Exhibition | LENSCRATCH

Lewis Hine said a wonderful thing a long time ago: “We should be photographing two things. The things that should be put right and the things that should be appreciated.” David Hurn used to have this quote on his wall when he was teaching. When I learned of this, it made me appreciate that a Magnum photographer such as David Hurn didn’t have to be a war photographer to create an important image. There are subjects more on the domestic side that interest me more. Hope, humor, empathy are qualities I value in a photograph.

American Fraternity: An Illustrated Manual by Andrew Moisey | LENSCRATCH

When I first saw the book, American Fraternity, published by Daylight Books, I was intrigued by its beautiful old-fashioned, shiny leather cover. It looked like one of those books you find at your grandfather’s house, a precious object. Inside, I found black and white photos, printed on yellow pages, with images that are crude, and powerful, combined with excerpts of pledges, prayers and vows taken from an actual ritual fraternity manual that Andrew Moisey found on the ground after the fraternity was closed down.

American Fraternity: An Illustrated Manual by Andrew Moisey | LENSCRATCH

When I first saw the book, American Fraternity, published by Daylight Books, I was intrigued by its beautiful old-fashioned, shiny leather cover. It looked like one of those books you find at your grandfather’s house, a precious object. Inside, I found black and white photos, printed on yellow pages, with images that are crude, and powerful, combined with excerpts of pledges, prayers and vows taken from an actual ritual fraternity manual that Andrew Moisey found on the ground after the fraternity was closed down.

Juxtapoz Magazine – Photography From The Fringe at House of Machines in LA

This weekend in Los Angeles, Iqvinder Singh has curated a group of photographers that capture life on the fringes, from gangs and cock fights to train hopping and trips to the desert, in an exhibition titled Outsiders Photography. The show is at House of Machines on the outer edges of LA’s Arts District. The show runs from 7-10pm, but honestly, who knows how late it’ll go…. check out the flyer and some of the work from the show below.

50 Years After Altamont: The End of the 1960s – The New York Times

The concert was featured in the documentary film “Gimme Shelter,” and a few photojournalists captured the experience. Among them was Bill Owens, who would soon rise to photographic fame for his seminal early 1970s project “Suburbia,” which cheekily documented the rise of the suburbs in California.

Jordan Gale: It Is What It Is | LENSCRATCH

In 2017, we featured the work of Jordan Gale as one of the Honorable Mention nods for the Lenscratch Student Award. I was moved by his work and it has stayed with me over the past two years. Jordan has an innate ability to tell stories, in particular his own–of family, poverty, and drug abuse. His insightful photographs and honest narration of what he has learned from who he was and where he came from is an amazing tribute to a young photographer. His images are dark, jittery, and truthful, perfectly capturing life on the edge.

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