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Egyptian Photog Shawkan to Serve 5 More Years in Jail with Daytime Furlough | PDNPulse

Photojournalist Mahmoud Abou Zeid, known as Shawkan, was released from prison in Egypt on March 4, more than five years after he was arrested and more than a year after prosecutors had sought the death penalty in his case. However his release carries conditions: He has to report to a police station every day for the next five years and spend every night in jail.

The underground skate scene of ‘90s Brooklyn

In his project We Skate Hardcore, photographer Vincent Cianni captures a forgotten community finding freedom in skateboarding.

Bedroom shots: Alec Soth on the intimacy of personal space

Alec Soth seriously considered giving up photography, before a new project exploring human connection in the contemporary world drew him back in. ‘I can’t help it,‘ he admits. ‘I am who I am.’

Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South | LENSCRATCH

It is such a pleasure to introduce Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South. Over the next week, we will feature selections of images from each of the 56 artists included in the project, as well as accompanying essays, maps, and videos. This expansive, comprehensive, multimedia investigation into what it means to be of, from, by the American South in the first decades of the twenty-first century was co-curated by Mark Sloan director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Mark Long, professor of political science, both of whom are on the faculty of the College of Charleston, in South Carolina.

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All the world’s a stage in these photos of the ‘theater of life’ – The Washington Post

Alex Majoli has been a member of the legendary photo cooperative Magnum Photos for well over a decade. During that time, he has been so many places, including the conflict zones of Iraq, Afghanistan and Gaza and the streets of Egypt and Tunisia during the Arab Spring. He has also written several books, such as “Leros,” an examination of a psychiatric hospital on the Greek island of Leros; “Congo,” a collaborative work with fellow photographer Paolo Pellegrin about the African nation; and “Libera Me,” an interpretive book inspired by Luigi Pirandello’s “Six Characters in Search of an Author,” in which Majoli meditates on the notion that we are all “actors of life.” Majoli’s newest work continues to look at the idea that life is theatrical, but on a much larger scale. This work is on display at Le Bal in Paris until April 28. The work is also published in book form by Le Bal and Mack.

Shahidul Alam’s Photo Festival in Bangladesh Is ‘an Act of Defiance’ – The New York Times

Despite Mr. Alam’s arrest for speaking out against his country’s government, Chobi Mela continues to showcase photography beyond the Western viewpoint.

A Year of Quiet Contemplation Led to the Rebirth of Alec Soth’s Photography – The New York Times

After taking a break from photography, Alec Soth has returned to capture the quietness and lyricism of people residing in their own homes.

The Disturbing True Story Behind the Iconic ‘Afghan Girl’ Photo

Tony Northrup recently decided to create a video celebrating photographer Steve McCurry’s most famous photo, the iconic “Afghan Girl” portrait featured on the cover of National Geographic. But upon researching the shot, Northrup learned the other, more disturbing side of the story that’s more hidden from public view.

Beautiful Deaths – Witness

These are Goya’s Disasters of War, a series of 82 prints made between 1810 and 1820 that show the horrors of war and its aftermath during the Spanish Napoleonic Wars. They are etchings, not photographs, but they are complete in their depiction of atrocity; there is death, mutilation, torture, execution, rape, pillage, starvation, sorrow, disgust and despair in unflinching detail. They show the effect of war on the civilian population and, in his etchings of the aftermath of the war and the restoration of a flawed monarchy and church, the ways in which suffering, corruption and war are linked to wider structures of power.

Alex Majoli : « Today, the world is covered with images »

The Italian-born photographer presents his “Scene” series at the BAL in Paris until April 28th. Armed with an imposing device made with electronic flashes as in a studio, Alex Majoli catches the image of a group of people in strong situations, sometimes in events of the news. It questions the way of doing photojournalism today and tries to capture the theatricality of the world. He gave an interview to The Eye of Photography.

Finding Echoes of Today’s Headlines in Central America’s Proxy Wars in the 1980s – The New York Times

Scott Wallace spent a good part of that era in Central America covering these proxy wars, whose effects are still being felt today in the debate over immigration, gangs and intervention in Venezuela. Yet for a region that is just a few hours away by plane, there has often been a great disconnect. Mr. Wallace, who developed a deep interest in Latin America during college, saw himself as someone who could perhaps become a bridge of sorts between north and south.

Hinda Schulman: Dear Shirley | LENSCRATCH

Love is a funny thing…it takes us to our highest highs and lowest lows. Our love life marks our personal histories and shapes the course of our lives. Photographer Hinda Schuman has documented the people she has loved in “an intimate and highly personal account of what it is like to live through the unraveling of relationships — both heterosexual and lesbian”. Through photographs and text her storytelling is a new book, Dear Shirley, A True Story published by Daylight Books, with forewords by Magdalena Sole and Sunil Gupta.  Hinda states, “Dear Shirley is about the power of photographs to unleash feelings and insights about both the beauty and horror of real life. I consider myself a visual storyteller. I use images –with and without text to create stories. I point the camera at myself as often as I look outward. This book tells the real life true story of the dissolution of two marriages: Jeremy after 10 years & Susan after 27 years.”

Looking Through the Eyes of a Daughter of the American South – Feature Shoot

Beginning in the mid-1970s, American artist Rosalind Fox Solomon traveled across the South creating a powerful series of photographs that reveal the state of the nation during the first decade following the Civil Rights Movement. It is here in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, and South Carolina that we are privy to the complex interconnection of life rooted in the triumphs, tragedies, and traumas of the past.

Wing Chan : Urbanmontage

f22 foto space presents Wing Chan’s ‘Urbanmontage’ exhibition. Combining Chan’s signature ‘Urban-Tapestry’ and ‘Urban-Graphis’ pieces, many of the works in the exhibition are shown for the first time. Chan’s photomontages create a new lens through which we can encounter our urban landscapes in a different light. Through his work, Chan encourages an intimate connection between us and our environment. The images are not only strikingly rhythmic; they also stimulate reflection and introspection. With a creative mix of angularity and fluidity, Chan’s photomontages encourage us to take a closer look at the harmony and beauty within the apparent chaos of urban living, thus allowing the city’s true fabric to shine.

The Myths and Realities of Artistic Collaborations | LENSCRATCH

On Saturday, March 9th at 9 am, there will be a panel discussion on The Myths and Realities of Artistic Collaborations presenting two collaborative projects: Wig Heavier than a Boot, a project by Photographer David Johnson and Poet Philip Matthews and Fade Like a Sigh, by Photographers Rana Young and Zora J Murff. During this presentation, both collaborative duos will discuss their projects’ concepts, how they established the collaborative endeavor and how they learned to build consensus and problem solve together. The panelists will provide keen insights on the most effective strategy for collaborations and a few suggestions on what not to do when working with someone else, from the idea to exhibition.

Winners of the 2019 Underwater Photographer of the Year Contest – The Atlantic

Organizers of the Underwater Photographer of the Year contest announced the winning photographers and images for this year, and the photographer Richard Barnden, from the U.K., was named Underwater Photographer of the Year 2019. More than 5,000 images were submitted by photographers from around the world. Prizes and commendations were handed out in categories including Wide Angle, Macro, Wrecks, Behavior, Portrait, Black and White, Compact, Up and Coming, and in British waters, Wide Angle, Living Together, Compact, and Macro Shots. UPY was once again kind enough to share some of this year’s honorees with us below, with captions written by the photographers.

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