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Jules Spinatsch: Semiautomaticphotography – AMERICAN SUBURB X

“Economically speaking, the transactions and values associated with perhaps what we may call “surrogate images” will inform society without society’s intervention into the process”.

Portrait of Britain 2019: Shortlisted and winning photographers – British Journal of Photography

Every September for the past three years, Portrait of Britain has taken over high streets, rail stations, shopping malls and airports across the United Kingdom, transforming JCDecaux screens into celebrations of the many faces of modern Britain, and its contemporary photographic talent. This year is no different. As much a celebration of photography as a celebration of our country’s people, Portrait of Britain has become the largest contemporary portrait exhibition ever held.

The Photography of Margaret Bourke-White – The Atlantic

Margaret Bourke-White was born in New York City in 1904, and grew up in rural New Jersey. She went on to study science and art at multiple universities in the United States from 1921 to 1927, then began a successful run as an industrial photographer, making notable images of factories and skyscrapers in the late 1920s. By 1929, she began working for magazine publishers, joining both Fortune and, later, LIFE. She spent years traveling the world, covering major events from World War II to the partition of India and Pakistan, the Korean War, and much more. Bourke-White held numerous “firsts” in her professional life—she was the first foreign photographer allowed to take pictures of Soviet industry, she was the first female staff photographer for LIFE magazine and made its first cover photo, and she was the first woman allowed to work in combat zones in World War II. Gathered here, a small collection of the thousands of remarkable images she made over a lifetime—Margaret Bourke-White passed away in 1971, at age 67, from Parkinson’s disease.

Visa pour l’Image returns with a focus on press freedom and fake news – British Journal of Photography

The 31st international festival of photojournalism delivers a programme of hard-hitting reportage in an era when increasing hostility threatens freedom of the press

Visa pour l’Image returns with a focus on press freedom and fake news – British Journal of Photography

The 31st international festival of photojournalism delivers a programme of hard-hitting reportage in an era when increasing hostility threatens freedom of the press

Lakes, jails and ice-skating bears: the world’s best photojournalism – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian

The International Festival of Photojournalism takes place in Perpignan, France, every year. Here, photojournalists uncover stories – from war to ecocide – that the powerful would often rather keep secret

Surfing in the Age of the Omnipresent Camera | The New Yorker

On a recent, sunny Friday morning, a group of journalists and photographers gathered on the roof deck of the Surfrider Malibu, a boutique hotel that looks out over the iconic surf break for which it’s named. We were there for a demo of a new feature from Surfline, an iPhone app best known for its surf forecasts. Called Sessions, the feature captures the waves surfers ride and downloads the videos to their phones. “The pro guys have their personal filmers documenting their every ride,” Dave Gilovich, Surfline’s chipper, sixty-seven-year-old brand director, said. “Well, Surfline Sessions is for the everyman.”

Photographers on Photographers: Emily Hamilton Laux and Dale Niles | LENSCRATCH

This month, we feature our annual August project, Photographers on Photographers, where visual artists interview colleagues they admire. Thank you to all who have participated for their time, energies and for efforts. Today we are happy to share this interview with Emily Hamilton Laux‘s interview with Dale Niles. – Aline Smithson and Brennan Booker

Mason Silva is capturing the grind of life on the road

Pro skater Mason Silva is entering a new phase of his career. In an industry famed for chewing up talent and spitting them out, he has embraced film photography as a way to stay grounded in the present – preserving moments of magic in the process.

After the fall: documenting the end of the caliphate – British Journal of Photography

In September 2017, Ivor Prickett met Nadhira Aziz, sat in a plastic chair 15 feet from where an excavator was digging through the ruins of her home in Mosul, Iraq. “At times, she was engulfed in dust as the driver dumped mounds of stone and parts of her house beside her,” Prickett writes in his remarkable new book, End of the Caliphate, published by Steidl. “But she refused to move.” He stayed there with her, until eventually they found the remains of two women – Mrs Aziz’s sister and niece, who had been killed by an airstrike that hit the home in June, three months prior.

Should Street Photography be Illegal? – PhotoShelter Blog

Street photography has a long history of candidly capturing subjects, but in today’s climate, does intent matter? In this episode of Vision Slightly Blurred, Sarah and Allen contemplate the work of photographers Daniel Arnold, Garry Winogrand, Diane Arbus, Mary Ellen Mark, Susan Meiselas, Philip Lorca Dicorcia, Vivan Maier, and Martha Cooper.

Cruising Down “The Boulevard” of the San Fernando Valley During the 1970s – Feature Shoot

Growing up in the San Fernando Valley of Southern California during the 1950s and ‘60s, American photographer Rick McCloskey spent his youth cruising Van Nuys Boulevard every Wednesday night. His family home, just one city block from “The Boulevard” was located a few blocks from the famed Bob’s Big Boy Restaurant, home of the All-American meal: burgers and milkshakes.

A Rediscovered Archive from California in the Seventies | The New Yorker

Sometime in 2002, the photographer Michael Jang went to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and dropped off some of his old pictures that he had recently rediscovered. At the time, the museum’s photography department had an open-submission policy; the curators would consider work that anyone brought in. Though Jang had worked locally as a successful professional photographer, he had all but forgotten about the work he had done in the seventies, when he was an art student who snuck into lavish parties, went to punk shows, and wandered the streets. The museum soon called him back, adding some of his work to its permanent collection and later exhibiting it as part of a show about California. Jang’s images were mischievous and quirky, full of visual jokes about how the rich and famous and the freaks and burnouts weren’t all that different from one another. In the years since, Jang has spent more time digging through his archives. The result is a stunning monograph, “Who Is Michael Jang?” (A related exhibition, “Michael Jang’s California” will be on exhibit at the McEvoy Foundation for the Arts, in San Francisco, from September 27th to January 18, 2020.)

Juxtapoz Magazine – The Art of Warez Documents the Lost ANSI Art Scene

British artist-filmmaker Oliver Payne and American painter Kevin Bouton-Scott have joined forces to produce a new documentary that tells an almost forgotten story of the ANSI scene. The Art Of Warez covers the days before the Internet when early hackers and online pirates created an original and, even today, a virtually unknown art movement.

Juxtapoz Magazine – Sophie Green’s Photographs of Spiritualist African Churches in London

Sophie Green’s series Congregation celebrates Southwark’s Aladura Spiritualist African churches and congregations. “Often referred to as ‘white garment’ churches, my images engage with these rarely documented dynamic communities who unite each weekend for Sunday service.”

Juxtapoz Magazine – Sophie Green’s Photographs of Spiritualist African Churches in London

Sophie Green’s series Congregation celebrates Southwark’s Aladura Spiritualist African churches and congregations. “Often referred to as ‘white garment’ churches, my images engage with these rarely documented dynamic communities who unite each weekend for Sunday service.”

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