Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – 7 February, 2020

This week on Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – the 10th annual Women’s show at Magnet Galleries, Melbourne, plus a review of Dr. Lauren Walsh’s exceptional book, Conversation…

For those of us who work in journalism the myth of the cavalier photojournalist who rushes toward conflict with zeal is well established. Robert Capa’s famous comment about photographers needing to get close to the action in order to capture the best picture is part of industry folklore. Don McCullin has spoken about the adrenalin rush of going to war, likening it to drug addiction. Tim Page’s antics during the Vietnam War have been immortalised in pop culture, Dennis Hopper’s character in the movie Apocalypse Now modelled on the British photographer. Yet while there are those who are lauded as celebrities, the vast majority of conflict photojournalists work in the background, committing themselves to covering some of the world’s darkest moments, to bearing witness to history, largely invisible to the outside world. Glory and money do not motivate them. In fact, these days it is more difficult to make ends meet than ever before. So what drives an individual to the frontline or to document the depths of human misery?

Photos. En Irak, la fuite éperdue des civils de Mossoul

Début juin, le photojournaliste Laurent Van der Stockt suivait les hommes des forces spéciales irakiennes. Dans Mossoul, il a vu des centaines de civils surgir parmi les ruines pour fuir les combats.

Le photojournaliste Laurent Van der Stockt a assisté à cette journée au cours de laquelle des centaines d’habitants ont surgi parmi les ruines

Fleeing Mosul

Five photographers document the flow of refugees escaping the Iraqi city

Over the last six weeks, five photographers—Maria Turchenkova, Laurent Van der Stockt, Jan Grarup, Ivor Prickett and Emin Ozmen—have documented Iraq’s push against ISIS and the resulting flow of refugees. They speak to TIME LightBox.