In Conversation: The Photographs of Alice Austen and Christine Osinski

Although the world has changed dramatically over the past century, there are some things that have remained very much the same. A new exhibition makes that point with a series of photographs by two photographers who captured daily life on Staten Island on

Although the world has changed dramatically over the past century, there are some things that have remained very much the same. A new exhibition makes that point with a series of photographs by two photographers who captured daily life on Staten Island one hundred years apart

On the Edge on Staten Island

When Christine Osinski moved to Staten Island in the 1980s, she found the long-overlooked borough with a tough edge gave her a sense of freedom and distance from Manhattan.

Christine Osinski, a photographer and Cooper Union professor, came to know the borough’s otherworldliness in the early 1980s, when she and her husband were forced out of their Lower Manhattan loft and went looking for a house they could afford

Christine Osinski: Shoppers, Chicago, and Swimmers 1980-1996

When I first encountered Christine Osinski's Staten Island work at Photo Nola last year it was love at first sight and I featured it on Lenscratch. As I shared in Monday's post, not only did Christine go on to win a spot in the 2013 Critical Mass Top 50,

I believe that good work will eventually find a place in the world, regardless of how long it takes to find its way. It’s most important for photographers to continue to take pictures, regardless of the attention or lack of attention that the work initially receives. I get great pleasure from being a working artist, day in and day out. By continuing to work consistently, I feel I will be ready should opportunity knock.

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The move to Staten Island came a few years after studying for her Master’s at Yale in 1974. During that time, she recalls the all-male faculty in the photo department was initially dismissive of her photographs of people and often saw them as funny. “Once I got to Yale I began to recognize where I was from,” Osinski says. “There was a contrast between me and my working class roots compared to the backgrounds of the other students.”