Tag: Lois Bielefeld

  • The 2021 Lenscratch Student Prize: 26 to Watch – LENSCRATCH

    http://lenscratch.com/2021/07/2021-lenscratch-student-prize-26-to-watch/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+lenscratch%2FZAbG+%28L++E++N++S++C++R++A++T++C++H%29
    Every year we seek to celebrate the next generation of photographic artists through our Student Prize Awards program. 2021 was a stellar year for photography, not only with a record number of excellent submissions, but the work itself reflected deep thinking and profound subject matter that it made it very difficult for the jurors to narrow down the selections. Before we begin the celebration of our 7 winners tomorrow, we wanted to shine a light on 26 photographers that you should have (and keep) on your radar, artists who may be at the beginning of their photography journey but are already working at an elevated level, creating work that is deeply meaningful, especially in a time when change is critical. Congratulations to all! – Aline Smithson
  • On Collaboration: On Belonging by Nirmal Raja and Lois Bielefeld | LENSCRATCH

    [contentcards url=“http://lenscratch.com/2019/12/on-collaboration-on-belonging-by-nirmal-raja-and-lois-bielefeld/”]

    On Collaboration: On Belonging by Nirmal Raja and Lois Bielefeld | LENSCRATCH

    Responding to increasing racial polarity in the United States, interdisciplinary artist Nirmal Raja and photographer Lois Bielefeld have launched two collaborative projects, reaching across race lines to explore identity, place, and belonging. Their initial project, Reaching Through 5 ½ yards, 8497 Miles, examines the role of cultural markers and our visual understanding of race.

  • This Is What Dinnertime Looks Like in Different Households – Feature Shoot

    [contentcards url=”http://www.featureshoot.com/2017/07/dinnertime-looks-like-different-households/”]

    This Is What Dinnertime Looks Like in Different Households – Feature Shoot

    “I’m super nosy about people’s habits,” Milwaukee photographer Lois Bielefeld admits. “I’ve always craved going into people’s homes- it’s inspiring, curious. It gives so many sometimes subtle and sometimes blatant insights about someone.”