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Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – 28 September 2018 – Photojournalism Now

This week on Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – Anthropocene, an expansive and immersive multimedia exhibition opens in Canada featuring the work of Edward Burtynsky (above), plus Getty Reportage Grant winners 2018.

Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – 21 September 2018 – Photojournalism Now

This week on Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up Chinese-born, Perth-based photo artist Tami Xiang’s new work Peasantography: Family Portrait and American photojournalist Chuck Fishman’s Re-Generation: Jewish Life in Poland.

Voices of African Photography: Dancing with Casablanca’s light – The Washington Post

Voices of African Photography is a 10-part series presented in partnership with the African Photojournalism Database, a joint project of Everyday Africa and World Press Photo, to highlight the work of 10 African photographers and photojournalists.

Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – 14 September 2018 – Photojournalism Now

This week on Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up the spotlight is on New York. If you’re looking for a nostalgic view of Greenwich Village check out Village Voice staff photographer Fred W. McDarrah: New York Scenes at Steven Kasher. In keeping with historical tropes is The New Beginning for Italian Photography: 1945-1965 at Howard Greenberg. And for a contemporary view of photography, the seventh edition of Photoville kicks off in Brooklyn.

What Is Missing From Photography | PDNPulse

It has been bugging me for a while now, there is just something that is missing from photography. From my personal work to the majority of photographers out there. I’m talking about the photos on your feeds, be it personal to commercial. It has been bugging me and I finally found out what it is, what is missing from photography, is stories.

How We Came to Know His Fall – Witness

That is, until an image came in from Richard Drew, a photographer for the Associated Press. A man in a simple white shirt and black pant ensemble, with one leg bent, in the upper third. His frame symmetrically dividing the North and South tower. He was falling, arms by his side, seemingly resigned to his fate. And in that moment, Margaret O’Connor was both a sifter and potential victim of casualty.

Celebrating 30 years of photojournalism at Visa pour l’Image – The Washington Post

Beyond the exhibitions and screenings, where hundreds of thousands of visitors can discover or rediscover some of the best of photojournalism produced around the world, Visa pour l’Image, the annual photography festival held in Perpignan, France, is also a meeting place.

The photographer turning oral histories into stunning images

In Congo Tales: Told by the People of Mbomo, Pieter Henket has created a visual library of personal histories, telling the story of one small town in the Republic of Congo.

Crippling costs of war reporting and investigative journalism

The cost of war reporting and investigative journalism is becoming prohibitive for media outlets, campaigners have warned.

With Internet giants like Google and Facebook soaking up advertising revenue while using the content of traditional media for free, quality journalism has been caught in a double bind, experts say.

Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – 31 August 2018 – Photojournalism Now

This week on Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – part two of the Visa pour l’image feature celebrating the international festival of photojournalism’s 30th edition. Plus Magnet Docklands launches with a fundraiser for the Human Rights Law Centre. Next week, 7 September there won’t be a post as we’re taking a short break!

Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – 24 August 2018 – Photojournalism Now

The 30th edition of the world’s preeminent photojournalism festival opens in the southern French town of Perpignan on 1st September for two weeks. For those who have not attended, Visa is amazing, overwhelming, fantastic!

Four to Follow #10 – Witness

While the issues, regions and approaches of this month’s stories are incredibly diverse, a passion for visual storytelling links the four APJD members — Eman Helal, Nourredine Ahmed, Etinosa Yvonne and Victoire Douniama. Each began a career in a different field before deciding to pursue photography full time.

Photographers on Photographers: Carolyn Russo on Isabel Corthier | LENSCRATCH

It was in 2011 at the Lishui Photo Festival in China, where I first met Isabel Corthier. I was drawn to her black and white portraits and her positive energy that comes with a wonderful Belgian-French accent and carefree laugh. It was obvious how anyone would be at ease in front of her camera. She had just received the Golden Award from the China International Digital Photography Art Exhibition Contest for her photographs in Africa. She told me her plans to sell off her worldly possessions in Belgium, for an upcoming move to Africa, and I thought she was courageous. We haven’t seen each other since parting ways in China, but we have stayed in touch via the internet and are now working together for her photographs to appear in an upcoming Smithsonian exhibition.

Pulitzer Prize Winning Photojournalist Carol Guzy Shares Lessons Learned In 35 Years In The Biz – Southampton Village & Surrounding Areas – 27east

As a photojournalist, Carol Guzy has documented an incredible amount of turmoil, upheaval and human suffering in her long career—first for the Miami Herald in the early 1980s, and then, beginning in 1988, at The Washington Post, where she was a staff photographer for almost three decades.Along the way, Ms. Guzy racked up some very impressive accolades, chief among them four Pulitzer Prizes for photography. She is one of just four people and the only journalist to have won that many.

Google’s Latest Doodle Honors War Photographer Gerda Taro

“Though she was tiny in stature, Gerda Taro had the heart of a giant,” Google writes. “Known as ‘the little red fox,’ the ginger-haired photographer fearlessly turned her camera lens to capture sensitive and critical images of conflict around the world, producing powerful black-and-white images that informed readers of the newspaper Ce Soir.

Nat Geo: We Went ‘Too Far’ in Linking Starving Polar Bear to Climate Change

“[B]ut there was a problem: We had lost control of the narrative,” writes Mittermeier in a new Nat Geo story for the August 2018 issue. “The first line of the National Geographic video said, ‘This is what climate change looks like’—with ‘climate change’ highlighted in the brand’s distinctive yellow.

NY Daily News Cuts All Photographers

The New York Daily News slashed its editorial staff in half this week, and among the casualties of the layoffs was the entire team of photographers. The paper, which called itself “New York’s Picture Newspaper” for over 70 years, now has zero staff photographers.

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