Cédric Gerbehaye: A “Gentle Rough” Incursion in Sète

Q: Did you feel comfortable using only one camera? A: In deciding to make it my main tool, there was something of the order of the obvious, the instinctive, regarding the relation to the object first, and then the relation to the reality in which one inscribes oneself with this tool. With this camera and this set up, I have a sense of simplicity and lightness, certain discretion. In one of his texts, Hervé Guibert talks about the “gentleness of intrusion.” This is something I try to put in place and which has always attracted me to a photographic project. With this camera, I have the feeling that I’m getting closer to my subjects than with the tools I previously used.

Winter in Sète

This year, Cédric Gerbehaye spent December and January photographing in Sète, France, the sixth photographer to do so as part of an artist-in-residency program. Accustomed to working in conflict zones, such as Palestine, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and South Sudan, this experience presented Gerbehaye with the opportunity to photograph in a different way

Showcase: No Relief and Little Attention

Sexual violence, child soldiers, wounded refugees and malnutrition — there is no shortage of suffering in Congo. Amber Benham says that’s why Cédric Gerbehaye is there.

Sexual violence, civilian casualties, child soldiers, wounded refugees and malnutrition — there is no shortage of suffering in Congo. And that is what engaged the attention of Cédric Gerbehaye, 32, who left journalism school with some basic photography skills, determined to pursue conflicts like the brutal fighting among militias and the Congolese army, which has been going on more than a decade with little interest from Western journalists.

State of the Art: Perpignan Update: Tuesday at the Festival

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Jean-Jacques and I were also fascinated by two projects on the Congo: Vu photographer Cedric Gerbehaye’s Congo In Limbo and Getty photographer Brent Stirton’s images for Newsweek and National Geographic about Congo’s Virunga National Park.

Check it out here.