6 Secrets to Great Portrait Lighting from Brian Smith - PhotoShelter Blog

For our guide, Growing Your Portrait Photography Business Part 2: Editorial and Commercial Photography, we talked to celebrity portrait photographer Brian Smith, who’s been shooting celebrities for 30 years. From Bill Gates to Anne Hathaway, Brian’s subje

How does Brian consistently produce amazing portraits? Besides being a dedicated people-person, a quick-thinker and above all, punctual, Brian knows how to make magic happen with light. Here, we gathered his six tips on lighting portraits from Part 2 of the Growing Your Portrait Photography Business Guide.

Video Interview: Brian Smith’s Secrets of Great Portrait Photography

He might photograph celebrities, but Brian Smith is a celebrity all his own. In this very popular webinar, Brian discussed everything from why photographers need to be 15-second psychoanalysts, to the importance of keeping a database of possible shoot locations in your head, to the benefits of putting subjects up on a pedestal or getting them down on your level – literally!

13 Digital Point-and-Shoot Cameras Used by the Pros - PhotoShelter Blog

About a year and a half ago, Grover put out the following question to the pro photographer community: What digital point-and-shoot camera are you using? Knowing how fast technology changes, we figured it was time for an update. So we went back to several

Knowing how fast technology changes, we figured it was time for an update. So we went back to several of the same photographers and asked them again, “What point-and-shoot camera do you use now  and in your opinion, what’s the best point-and-shoot camera?” Several of the same big-name pros like Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Brian Smith and photojournalist David Burnett gave their two-cents; we also posed the question on PhotoShelter’s Twitter and Facebook to get some fresh opinions.

THE BUSINESS OF EDITORIAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Brian Smith – A Picture’s Worth:

If you’re waiting to “raise your game” until you get your dream gig, you’ll never get it. I spent the first decade of my career and a newspaper photographer, and I put the same effort into my assignments for newspaper as I did on the freelance shoots for Rolling Stone.