11 Photographers on How To Finish a Body of Work

When should you bring a photographic project to an end? LaToya Ruby Frazier, Justine Kurland, Alec Soth, and more reflect on how to know when a series of work is complete.

Over the course of her career, curator and lecturer Sasha Wolf has heard countless young photographers say they often feel adrift in their own practices, wondering if they are doing it the “right” way. This inspired her to seek out insights from a wide range of photographers about their approaches to making photographs and a sustained a body of work, which are brought together in PhotoWork: Forty Photographers on Process and Practice. Structured as a Proust-like questionnaire, the responses from both established and newly emerging photographers reveal that there is no single path. Below, eleven artists respond to the question: How do you know when a body of work is finished?

Bryan Schutmaat:The Goddamn Interview

"In very broad terms, it seems that the work made in the West during the 20th century portrays a prolonged event – a disaster, you could say – that unfolded as modernity overtook the landscape and ideologies were instilled in American culture".

“In very broad terms, it seems that the work made in the West during the 20th century portrays a prolonged event – a disaster, you could say – that unfolded as modernity overtook the landscape and ideologies were instilled in American culture”.

Of Drought and Man in the West – The New York Times

Four photographers –  Christaan Felber, Bryan Schutmaat,Jake Stangel and Michael Friberg – were enlisted by photo editors  Luise Stauss and Ayanna Quint to document man’s mistakes and their consequences. Mr. Friberg, who has lived in the West for the last decade, thought he knew the issues facing the Colorado River. He soon discovered he was wrong.

LightBox | Time

Read the latest stories about LightBox on Time

As Breaking Bad fans become increasingly transfixed by imagery of the American West, Bryan Schutmaat’s haunting photographs of Western mountain men reveal an even darker landscape, without at meth-camper in sight.

CENTER AWARDS: Gallerist’s Choice Awards: 1st Place Winner: Bryan Schutmaat

CENTER's Gallerist's Choice Juror, Lauren Panzo is the Director at Pace/MacGill Gallery in New York.  Lauren selected Bryan Schtmaat to recieved the 1st place Award for his evocative project, Grays the Mountain Sends. Tomorrow we will feature 2nd and 3rd

This project combines portraits, landscapes, and still lifes in a series of photos that explores the lives of working people residing in small mountain towns and mining communities in the American West. Equipped with a large format view camera, and inspired by the poetry of Richard Hugo, I’ve aimed to hint at narratives and relay the experiences of strangers met in settings that spur my own emotions

Contemplative Portraits and Landscapes Explore Working People of the American West

Equipped with a large format view camera, and inspired by the poetry of Richard Hugo, I’ve aimed to hint at narratives and relay the experiences of strangers met in settings that spur my own emotions. Ultimately, this body of work is a meditation on small town life, the landscape, and more importantly, the inner landscapes of common men.—Bryan Schutmaat

1. Bryan Schutmaat

​Grays the Mountain Sends ​This project combines portraits, landscapes, and still lifes in a series of photos ​...

Shooting in the dark, with a handheld camera, in a vibrating helicopter, 5,000 feet above land sounds like a photographer’s nightmare. But Iwan Baan made it look easy.