The Significance of a Personal Project

My daily stroll through the newly-built but already-decaying park near my apartment in Hanoi while listening to Spotify on a brisk (by Southeast Asia

When I arrived back in Hanoi I was accompanied by a truck load of credit card debt from gear purchased that I didn’t need and a year left at university that I would never finish. My plan was to focus on personal projects and use my time shooting my projects as my version of my final year of school. I was intrigued by a book I found in San Francisco by Philip Jones Griffiths about victims of agent orange and I wanted to do my own version of this story.

The Magnificent One: Philip Jones Griffiths by Donna Ferrato and Emmanuel Trousse — duckrabbit

I haven’t had a chance to watch this yet because I’m training a group of people in London, but I’m...

Legendary anti-war photographer and author of Viet Nam Inc, Philip Jones Griffiths, gives the interview of a lifetime only 48 hours before he died in at his home in London on March 19, 2008

Mythical power: Understanding photojournalism in the Vietnam War - David Campbell

Photojournalism in the Vietnam War is often said to have had the power to change the course of the conflict. But this power is mythical.

"This is significant for photojournalism’s understanding of its historical role and potential power. Many of the visual icons we now associate with the war – the photographs of Larry Burrows, Philip Jones Griffiths, Don McCullin and others – were either rejected by the American media, published after the event, or were simply unrepresentative of the majority coverage. "

Look 3 Report: Donna Ferrato on Philip Jones Griffiths, Don McCullin, and Complicated Relationships | PDNPulse

Donna Ferrato brought a quick wit and joie de vivre to an onstage interview with NPR personality Alex Chadwick at the LOOK3 photo festival in Charlottesville on Friday afternoon. A unifying theme of their wide-ranging discussion was Ferrato’s belief in th

Donna Ferrato brought a quick wit and joie de vivre to an onstage interview with NPR personality Alex Chadwick at the LOOK3 photo festival in Charlottesville on Friday afternoon. A unifying theme of their wide-ranging discussion was Ferrato’s belief in the life-affirming power of emotional intimacy and mutual respect that has informed her work and career.

The Dauntless Spirit – Philip Jones Griffiths: 1936-2008

Peter Howe:

f you knew Wales, you knew Philip Jones Griffiths. To the end of his life he remained true to his Welshness, which defined him with a power that few environments exert. Both he and his birthplace are rife with contradictions. It is a breathtakingly beautiful land, and relentlessly bleak, a land of strong communities made up of fierce individualists, where physical poverty has produced spiritual richness. Philip’s personality reflected this duality. He was a cynical idealist; a serious man with a playful wit; his mind was analytical but his soul was passionate; profoundly moral he could be wickedly lascivious; he was opinionated but compassionate. The one area of his life that was without contradiction, and which dominated him to his last day, was his craft. He was without compromise, without hesitation and without deviation a photographer, one of the greatest photojournalists this profession has been proud to call its own.

Check it out here.

Philip Jones Griffiths 1936-2008 – Magnum Photos

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It was Philip’s consummate skill as a picture maker, carefully able to draw the viewer closer and closer to his subjects through his emotionally-charged compositions that lent such power to his work. Philip was always concerned with individuals – their personal and intimate suffering more than any particular class or ideological struggle. And the strength of his vision, that inspired so many of us, led Henri Cartier-Bresson to write of Philip: “not since Goya has anyone portrayed war like Philip Jones Griffiths.”

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War photographer Philip Jones Griffith dies at 72

British photojournalist Philip Jones Griffiths, known for his unflinching coverage of the Vietnam war, died on Tuesday aged 72, the Magnum photo agency said.
    Born in Wales in 1936, Griffith Jones launched his career as a freelancer for Britain’s Observer newspaper in 1961, covering the Algerian war in 1962 before travelling across central Africa.
    In a career that took him to more than 120 countries, Griffith Jones covered everything from Buddhism in Cambodia, drought in India, poverty in Texas or the legacy of the Gulf war in Kuwait.

Check it out here.