B: Q & A with Jeffrey Ladd

Q & A with Jeffrey Ladd

Not off the top of my head but they would send emails with a selection of people’s work asking our thoughts and who we would support for ‘inclusion’. And it was mostly just a rehash of every silly pun picture I have seen before and not interesting to me. That’s why I said, whoever they invite that they should just replace me because I lost interest in that language of photography. That pissed off some people.

Found: James Blair on Recording History | PROOF

Found: James Blair on Recording History

Jim Blair is an innovator, but not in the contemporary, technology-focused use of that word. Jim’s photography particularly broke new ground in content for National Geographic from 1960 to 1994. He, along with a handful of other like-minded photographers, stretched what “science” could encompass by arguing that social and environmental problems should be included in the dialogue that National Geographic was having with its readers.

Stephen Wilkes: Time Machine — zPhotoJournal

Stephen Wilkes: Time Machine

I see a lot out there and what I see is people who have talent and work hard…or think they work hard…but the priority they need to get to that special place is going to escape them. They don’t understand that the level of passion and drive that you have to have to be really successful in this business today is amplified. Everybody has a camera and it’s incredible who you’re competing with. So my advice is something Jay Maisel once told me, “You gotta eat, sleep, breathe and drink it. And if you don’t do that, find something else to do!” 

Go Behind the Scenes with Celebrity Photographer Jeff Riedel – LightBox

Go Behind the Scenes with Celebrity Photographer Jeff Riedel

This week on #LightBoxFF, we speak to commercial and editorial photographer Jeff Riedel, (@jeff_riedel_polariods) whose meticulous approach to photography has not only landed his work on the pages of GQ, Vanity Fair, Rolling Stone and Vogue, but has also helped him accumulate a massive collection of Polaroids, which he has used for years to test and fine-tune variables during shoots and is now posting to his Instagram feed.

A Conversation with Martin Parr | burn magazine

A Conversation with Martin Parr

When I try a new technique, I always do it first on the beach. There are about six phases of my photography career, black and white, then wide angle with medium format, etc., etc., but I always try them out on the beach first because it’s like an experimental laboratory for me. You have all these people, you can do different things, so this is no exception. It is really like the last chapter of exploration. So inevitably, therefor, I begin at the beach first.