Matt Eich's The Seven Cities

"Everything seems somehow familiar and distant at the same time. It is as if time has wedged us between the fever dream of summer and the insoluble gaslighting conjured up from what was believed to be a significantly flawed, but tolerable near past"

“Everything seems somehow familiar and distant at the same time. It is as if time has wedged us between the fever dream of summer and the insoluble gaslighting conjured up from what was believed to be a significantly flawed, but tolerable near past”

Photographer Matt Eich examines and celebrates his local roots in his book ‘The Seven Cities’

"The Seven Cities" is the third in his series called "The Invisible Yoke." Here he looks at the people and places of Hampton Roads, and at the weight of memory.

Eich’s latest photography book, “The Seven Cities,” is a look at the places and people that make up Hampton Roads. It shows the variety that anyone can discover in an hour’s drive from an oyster roast in Suffolk to a Russian Orthodox Church service in Virginia Beach to an Amtrak bus station stop in Newport News. It also illuminates the grief, hope, anxiety and laughter of its people.

Matt Eich – Say Hello to Everybody, OK?

  Matt Eich Say Hello to Everybody, OK? [ EPF 2019 FINALIST ] In 2019-2020 I will be commuting from Charlottesville, Virginia to Washington, D.C. via train on a weekly basis. I also intend to walk …

In 2019-2020 I will be commuting from Charlottesville, Virginia to Washington, D.C. via train on a weekly basis. I also intend to walk the train line in intervals, photographing the scenes I encounter on its peripheries. I view the train line as an artery between my home in Charlottesville (where my heart stays), and Washington, DC, the seat of power in the United States. During my days in Washington, DC I will document the dichotomy between the powerful and the powerless. During my days in Charlottesville, I will photograph my own family, and my community. The background for these images are the final days of Trump’s first term in office, and the lead-up to the next Presidential elections. By juxtaposing powerful circles in Washington, DC with the recovering community of Charlottesville, VA, and the largely rural area in between, I will attempt to put my finger on the pulse of our country during this critical time.

Matt Eich: I Love You, I’m Leaving

At this particular time I have no one Particular person to grieve for, though there must Be many, many unknown ones going to dust I often recall this verse by Elizabeth Jennings from her poem In Memory of Anyone Unknown to Me when I view images that cause

I often recall this verse by Elizabeth Jennings from her poem In Memory of Anyone Unknown to Me when I view images that cause my heart to ache, that force me to empathize and consider the threads that join together our collective stories. The images in Matt Eich’s newest monograph, I Love You, I’m Leaving, published by Ceiba Editions, weave these threads into a complicated yet tender, semi-fictional portrait of a family enduring the chaos and elation of life. Every photograph is steeped in a familiar, heavy kind of tension that can be recognized by any viewer. We are invited to experience at once both pain and joy, love and frustration, closeness and distance, sharp reality and fleeting memory. Eich uses his camera to grasp at the apparitions of human experience, in his words, wrestling fragile memories into a permanent state. Everything from the cover image of a half-erased chalkboard, to the cyclical nature of the book sequence, echoes Eich’s attempts to construct something concrete from the intangible, creating at once a book object that feels both uniquely personal and profoundly universal.

Matt Eich – I Love You, I’m Leaving

Matt Eich I Love You, I’m Leaving [ EPF 2017 – FINALIST ] My introduction to photography was in childhood, as my grandmother was dying of Alzheimer’s disease. The hopelessness of …

My introduction to photography was in childhood, as my grandmother was dying of Alzheimer’s disease. The hopelessness of her plight triggered something within me, and when my grandfather handed me a camera, making photographs became a way of stabilizing the insecurity of memory and accessing emotional resonance. If we are at risk of forgetting too much of our world, and ourselves, photography is the antidote.

A Hidden American Anger

Life in Ohio's proud but economically abandoned small towns

Just over a decade ago, Matt Eich started photographing rural Ohio. Largely inhabited by what is now known as the “Forgotten Class” of white, blue-collar workers, Eich found himself drawn to the proud but economically abandoned small towns of Appalachia

I spent 10 years photographing Appalachia

Carry Me Ohio: the place that taught me to see

Matt Eich: More than a decade ago, I arrived broken hearted in the Appalachian region of southeast Ohio. I was fascinated by the haunting hills, the winding roads, and found myself photographing everything: the smokey bars, the strip mines and in the homes of these forgotten communities.

The Sellers Way: Lessons on Life, Love, and Connectedness

One day, while wandering a small village in southeastern Ohio, I stumbled on a rugged-looking man and his two sons cleaning up muddy dirt bikes at a car wash. Most of the folks I had encountered up until this point were incredibly distrustful of outsiders

Matt Eich: One day, while wandering a small village in southeastern Ohio, I stumbled on a rugged-looking man and his two sons cleaning up muddy dirt bikes at a car wash. Most of the folks I had encountered up until this point were incredibly distrustful of outsiders, so I was immediately drawn in by his open demeanor. He seemed just as curious about me as I was about him.

Getty Images Announces 2015 Grant Winners

Photographers doing personal projects on social issues that often go overlooked received $10,000 each today from the 2015 Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography.

Matt Eich, 29, received his second Getty grant for his project on poverty, heroin, and the oil and gas industries in southeastern Ohio. It is a continuation of his work from 2006 to 2012 in the area and will be published in the book “Carry Me Ohio” by Sturm and Drang next year.

Matt Eich: The States Project: Virginia

I first met Matt Eich in 2011 when we were on a three-person panel at the Savannah College of Art and Design. I had long admired his work and accomplishments when I discovered how young he was and that he had been helping support a beautiful family of fou

His photographs are made with an abundance of affection, curiosity, and integrity, no matter where he is or who he is photographing.

Matt Eich – Sin and Salvation in Baptist Town

Matt Eich Sin and Salvation in Baptist Town [ EPF 2014 SHORTLIST ] For the last four years I have been drawn to Greenwood, Mississippi like a moth to a flame. Since 2010, I have explored a complex …

After years of making documentary images, I have grown frustrated with what photography is, and more interested in what it could be. I started making 6×7 images, a mixture of landscapes, documentary photographs, and most importantly, collaborative portraits. In this work I begin to blend these different representations of place with an emphasis on creating work that is less about my perspective as an outsider, and more about how the people I am photographing wish to be portrayed.

HotShoe

Matt Eich is a young American with a passion for photographing the people of the land that he calls home. Having recently exhibited his series, The Invisible Yoke, in New York, Alia Thomas caught up with him to find out more about photographing the American Condition.  

A Look Inside the Gritty World of Alligator Hunting in Louisiana - Feature Shoot

Virginian photographer Matt Eich examines the world of Louisiana "gator country," capturing those who hunt, farm, and live off of the scaly, prehistoric creatures of the deep South. Considered the largest animal in North America, the centuries-old industr

Virginian photographer Matt Eich examines the world of Louisiana “gator country,” capturing those who hunt, farm, and live off of the scaly, prehistoric creatures of the deep South

Down South: Greenwood Revisited

Last week, the Virginia-based photographer Matt Eich hosted The New Yorker’s Instagram feed from Greenwood, Mississippi, which he has been documenting for the past several years, for a project about the town’s race and class disparity.

Matt Eich – Fear & Self Loathing in America

Matt Eich Fear and Self Loathing in America [ EPF 2013 SHORTLIST ] ESSAY CONTAINS EXPLICIT CONTENT For the last eight years I have catalogued the American experience in pictures, trying to understa…

My generation lives in a constantly changing world, swept down a river of information with our eyes to the future and a shrinking awareness of the past.

Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography: Matt Eich

For the past three years Matt Eich has made the journey to Greenwood, Mississippi, to document the everyday lives of the local people. Using the Getty Editorial Grant he now plans to develop this into a large-scale participatory project that will bring members of the community together