2020 Infinity Award: Lifetime Achievement—Don McCullin

Sir Don McCullin. He photographed his first open conflict essay about the civil war in Cyprus in 1964. In 1966 he began an eighteen-year affiliation with the London Sunday Times Magazine, covering major conflicts and battlefields — the Congo, Biafra, Israel, Vietnam, Cambodia, Northern Ireland, Bangladesh, Lebanon, El Salvador, Iraq, and Syria — and became recognized both as a master of black-and-white photography and as a legendary war photographer. He is the author of more than twenty books, including his acclaimed autobiography, Unreasonable Behaviour. Previous recognition includes two Premier Awards from World Press Photo, the 2006 ICP Infinity Awards Cornell Capa Award, and the 2016 Master of Photography at Photo London. He was made Commander of the British Empire in 1993, and was knighted in 2017. His work has been exhibited worldwide, including a full retrospective of his career presented by London’s Tate Britain in 2019.

Seeing War Abroad and at Home Through the Eyes of Don McCullin - Feature Shoot

Local Boys in Bradford 1972 Don McCullin – Near Checkpoint Charlie, Berlin 1961 Londonderry 1971 At the age of 83, British photojournalist Sir Don McCullin decidedly declared, “I’m not an…

At the age of 83, British photojournalist Sir Don McCullin decidedly declared, “I’m not an artist” — while standing inside a major retrospective of his work now on view at the Tate in London through May 6, 2019.

Beyond the Myth of the War Photographer

In “Shooting War,” the psychiatrist Anthony Feinstein explores the complexity of photographers’ day-to-day work covering conflict and human depravity.

The psychiatrist Anthony Feinstein explores this complexity in his book, “Shooting War” (Glitterati Editions). Starting with a single, striking image from each photographer, Dr. Feinstein profiles 18 conflict photographers, including Don McCullin, Tim Hetherington and Corinne Dufka, and examines their motivations, traumas, and, most important, their resilience.

Photographer Don McCullin reflects on a life on the front line

Don McCullin has seen enough of war and suffering to last a lifetime. From Cyprus to the Congo, he has captured some of the most powerful photographs of our time. The shell-shocked U.S. Marine gripping his gun with a long, bewildering stare. A starving tw

(CNN)Don McCullin has seen enough of war and suffering to last a lifetime. From Cyprus to the Congo, he has captured some of the most powerful photographs of our time. The shell-shocked U.S. Marine gripping his gun with a long, bewildering stare. A starving twentysomething mother trying to breastfeed her child in Biafra.

Photo London 2016: Editors’ Preview - Photographs will be exhibited at the 2016 Photo London | LensCulture

DON’T MISS OUT: A fresh and selective early preview of just a fraction of the wide ranging array of photography that will be on display (and for sale) at Photo London, May 19-22, 2016

Other highlights of the program include the live, participatory production of the "largest-ever Ambrotype portrait" by the London duo Walter and Zoniel on the opening night of the fair. Legendary photojournalist Don McCullin will present some of his work and take part in a public conversation with the Tate Modern's Simon Baker. Over 20 other world-class photographers will also present their work in a series of conversations and presentations—from Martin Parr to Nadav Kander, David Maisel and many more.

Top Photographers Protest Museum Decision

“This government, they’ve got their hatchet out and they are hacking away at the arts."

More than 80 prominent photographers and artists—including war photographer Don McCullin, photo critic Sean O’Hagan and book publisher Michael Mack—are demanding a reversal on the controversial decision to move a historic photo archive from Bradford to London.

Don McCullin at War

The legendary photographer counsels those seeking conflict: look close to home at the social wars being waged every day.

The documentary film “McCullin” by Jacqui Morris had its American debut at the Museum of Modern Art this week, and an updated version of the book “Don McCullin” was reissued this year by Aperture. Mr. McCullin, who is represented by Contact Press Images, spoke this week with Michael Kamber, who has photographed conflict in Africa and the Middle East for The New York Times and is the founder of the Bronx Documentary Center. Their conversation has been edited.

Extraordinary New Book Unveils the Untold Stories of the World's Greatest Photojournalists - Feature Shoot

The duty of a photojournalist, according to many, is to remain detached in a moment of crisis, to compartmentalize scenes of violence and war from the goings on of everyday life. As suggested by Italian journalist Mario Calabresi in his extraordinary book

As suggested by Italian journalist Mario Calabresi in his extraordinary book Eyes Wide Open, however, the best storytellers are those who allow themselves to be submerged within often painful events, to forgo absolute objectivity in favor of something rarer: a precarious marriage of impartiality and intimate involvement. In interviews with ten photographers who have not only documented but in many ways shaped the course of history—Steve McCurry, Josef Koudelka, Don McCullin, Elliott Erwitt, Paul Fusco, Alex Webb, Gabriele Basilico, Abbas, Paolo Pellegrin, and Sebastiao Salgado

The Tri-X factor

Kodak’s Tri-X is the film the great photographers love. Anton Corbijn, Don McCullin and Sebastião Salgado tell Bryan Appleyard why

Kodak's Tri-X is the film the great photographers love. Anton Corbijn, Don McCullin and Sebastião Salgado tell Bryan Appleyard why

The "Shame of Memory" Haunts a War Photographer

With the looming crisis in Syria as backdrop, conflict photographers and photo editors of multiple generations debate the value and power of the imagery that emerges from war.

A 13th-century church is a fitting location for the exhibition of war photographs by Don McCullin, a man intent on paying public penance. Most photographers would be proud of the honors and accolades showered on Mr. McCullin at Perpignan’s Visa Pour l’Image festival this week. Instead, he recoiled in shame, as if the words had wounded him.