Greg Brophy: The Iron Triangle

Greg Brophy’s series, The Iron Triangle, pays homage to the disappearing steel-clad landscape and the working class champions of Willets Point, Queens, New York. Brophy set out to photograph the neighborhood to document the area before sanitized, and homogenous structures displace the current social fabric in a proposed redevelopment by the city. Unfortunately, a convention center or sterile shopping center will soon take its place.

In this photographer’s home town, stepping out of the house is a risk

When people step out of their houses in my home town, they tell their loved ones, “I hope to see you again” — there’s no guarantee they will make it back. I started photographing Kirkuk in 2007. The security situation has been bad since 2003, but it took a turn for the worst with the war against the Islamic State. The war is very close to the city and people are scared. The economy worsened and there are fewer jobs. Arabs are suspicious of the Turkmen and Peshmergas and the other way around. There are still explosions and kidnappings. The city has long been a dangerous place, a flashpoint for Iraq’s many ethnic and sectarian conflicts.

The latest issue of Dog Food

Dog Food 5 has just arrived on the scene and introduces the newly formed KRISIS photo agency on the world stage. Follow their exploits from the Island of Lesbos to the depths of Syria. The editors created Archive articles from Kurdistan to Canada. Including a new photo manifesto, trigger-fingers, and a tribute to a photographer that has left us. Can you identify every photographer on the cover? Dog food is free and free for all

Chris Bickford – Legends of the Sandbar

Legends of the Sandbar is an homage to the surf culture of the Outer Banks of North Carolina, written and photographed by Christopher Bickford. It is an ode to the wild and wooly weather of the Banks, their shape-shifting sandscapes, their salt-battered architecture, and the commitment of a waterlogged band of misfits to a life lived on the fringes of American civilization. It is a portrait of a place, a people, and a passion, a drama set upon a wayward string of earth dangling on the edge of the continental shelf. It bears testimony to the raw beauty of lives lived close to the edge, the kinetic artistry of surfing in a challenging aquatic environment, and the ragged glory of a boondock community tuned to the savage power of the storm-tossed Atlantic Ocean.

The World’s Best Photo?

Still, the jurors were “quite split” on the award, said Stuart Franklin, the jury chairman and a member of the international photographic cooperative Magnum Photos, who did not vote for Mr. Ozbilici’s image. He said that it was difficult to say much about deliberations because of a nondisclosure agreement jurors signed. The image, he said, was a hard-hitting news photo that was “extraordinarily well taken” by a man who has “my total respect.” But Mr. Stuart worried about “amplifying a terrorist message in some way” by giving the photo the top prize.

World Press Photo: Photo of Assassination Wins Top Prize

Burhan Ozbilici’s photograph is intense and haunting. Shot in the seconds following the assassination of Andrey Karlov, Russia’s ambassador to Turkey, it shows the gunman, Mevlüt Mert Altıntaş, standing next to the lifeless body, with one hand pointing to the sky and the other still holding the gun. On his face, we can read his fury and determination, making Ozbilici’s photograph one of the most intense images of 2016.

The Winning Photos from DJI’s 2016 SkyPixel Photo Contest

DJI has announced the winning photos of its 2016 SkyPixel Photo Contest, which honors the best aerial and drone photos captured around the world using DJI camera drone equipment. The grand prize winner this year is the photo above, titled “Fishermen close the net” by Ge Zheng.

A Photographer’s View of a Battle to Destroy ISIS

This fall, I spent six weeks with the writer Luke Mogelson, following an élite Iraqi police unit called the Mosul swat team as its members fought to take back their city from the forces of the Islamic State. The story, which Luke wrote and I photographed, was called “The Avengers of Mosul”—the men were seeking vengeance not just for the threat to their country as a whole but also for the murders of family members by isis. Nearly every fighter had suffered this kind of loss, and many of them had family still living in peril in Mosul. The men welcomed us on their campaign, and shared with us their provisions, their blankets and mats, their seats in the trucks, and their stories.

Richard Mosse on Using a Military Grade Camera to Find Signs of Life in Refugee Camps

On a tip from a friend, Mosse bought a military-grade camera meant for long-range battle surveillance that doesn’t see visible light. Instead, this camera sees heat and produces crisp black-and-white images that are exposed based on the relative warmth of everything in the frame. Mosse then used this camera, intended to track and target, as a way to document displacement and the daily fight for survival by the refugees living in camps across Europe for a new project called Heat Maps.

Greetings from Uzbekistan, the Country that Grows Cotton in the Desert

London-based photographer Marco Barbieri has always been interested in countries where politics and religion play a central role in people’s lives. He decided to travel to Uzbekistan after seeing images from the disappearing Aral Sea, but his initial plan became much more than he thought it would. His photo series Water in the Desert places water in the country’s broader context, and reveals how a dictatorship can turn logic upside down and make the absurd an acceptable part of daily life.

Enrique Metinides, criminal photographs in Mexico City

From 1948 until his forced retirement in 1979, the Mexican photographer Enrique Metinides took thousands of images and followed hundreds of stories in and around Mexico City. And what images and stories they were: car wrecks and train derailments, a bi-plane crashed on to a roof, street stabbings and shootings in the park, apartments and petrol stations set alight, earthquakes, accidental explosions, suicides, manslaughters, murder.

From Artificial Intelligence to Intelligent Imaging

we need more smartness in our photo lives: we’re taking way too many photos, which are way too difficult to keep track of, way too hard to enhance into must-keep masterpieces, and way too time-consuming to combine with other content into enticing collages, multimedia trailers, or printed photobooks

California Sunday Magazine Wins National Magazine Award for Photography

The California Sunday Magazine received the 2017 National Magazine Award for Photography in a ceremony held Tuesday in New York City. Pacific Standard took home the award for Feature Photography, which honored “Adrift,” a story about the refugee crisis shot by Francesco Zizola aboard search-and-rescue boats in the Mediterranean Sea.

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