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From Wired:

The plot doesn’t make much sense, either. V blows up a building, liquidates a bunch of high-powered enemies and threatens to overthrow the powers that be. The government’s response? To send two cops to track him down. Two cops! Some police state.

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From Rob Galbraith:

Canon has posted updaters or installers for several of its digital SLR software applications. Available for download are Digital Photo Professional (DPP) 2.1, EOS Utility 1.0, CameraWindow DSLR 5.3R2 (Windows), ZoomBrowser EX 5.6.0 (Windows) and ImageBrowser 5.6.1a (Mac).

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From Christopher Morris of the photo agency VII:

This is my personal look into the visit of U.S. President George W. Bush to India, Pakistan and Afghanistan in March 2006.

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From UC Berkeley News:

Jackie Spinner, Washington Post staff writer and author of “Tell Them I Didn’t Cry,” an account of a year spent in Baghdad starting in May 2004, disagreed that reporters in Iraq are prevented from telling both sides. “I think we’re getting 90 percent of the story,” she said. When disbelieving guffaws rang out from the audience, she retorted, “Excuse me, have you been there?”

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From DPReview:

Epson Japan has today announced a subtly improved version of its unique R-D1 Digital Rangefinder Camera. Just like the R-D1 the R-D1s features the a six megapixel APS-C size sensor and supports Leica M and L mount lenses. New features include a ‘Quick View’ record review function, RAW+ JPEG support, Adobe RGB color space, image parameter control, long exposure noise reduction and higher playback magnification.

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From PDN:

The two journalists were among at least eight foreigners abducted by Palestinian gunmen in response to an Israeli raid on a Palestinian prison in the West Bank city of Jericho, according to various news reports.

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From we make money not art:

The artist has parked six cars outside the synagogue and attached their exhaust pipes to the building using plastic tubes. It is then filled with deadly gas. Visitors are invited to go inside one by one wearing a gas mask, escorted by a firefighter. Before being allowed in, they have to sign a disclaimer stating they realise the room is full of carbon monoxide.

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From hustler of culture:

Reception, Saturday, April 1st, 2006
7pm to 11pm
Runs through, Saturday, April 29th, 2006

White Walls
835 Larkin Street
San Francisco, CA 94109

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From some blog:

On Saturday, at the game, when Pruitt was introduced in the starting lineup, the chants began: “Victoria, Victoria.” One of the fans held up a sign with her phone number.

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From the photo agency VII:

The war in the Democratic Republic of Congo may have ended in 2004, but every week, hundreds of people continue to die, most from illnesses easily treatable in times of peace. In a country where cholera, ebola, malaria, and even the plague are endemic, war turned disease into a slow-burning weapon of mass destruction. James Nachtwey visited the DRC in the summer of 2005 and witnessed the pain and suffering of the Congolese, the horrors of war, the ravages of disease, the dead and the dying.

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From the BBC, meet Mirjana, Marija, and Marko:

He brought the town two major attractions – an amusement park called Bambiland and the glittering Madonna disco.

In November 2001 he was charged with threatening a pro-democracy demonstrator in Pozarevac with a chainsaw. But he had long since fled to Moscow.

He described himself as “gentle and “sensitive” but “prone to depression”.

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From the New York Times:

White House officials will not say whether Mr. Bush overruled the Secret Service in making the trip, or even if he was told not to go. But it is no secret that the service was in a state of anxiety during his time in Islamabad.

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From the New York Times:

The war was barely a week old when Gen. Tommy R. Franks threatened to fire the Army’s field commander.

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From the New York Times:

On his computer screen, Jake R. Sanowski scrutinizes a short video of a baby eating its first pickle. Next is a skit of a woman getting drunker over the course of a meal at which, it turns out, her dining companion is a dog. That is followed by a clip of a band playing a song, but the lighting is so dim that the screen is nearly black. “I feel really bad for it,” Mr. Sanowski said.

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From the BBC:

But Mr Uges believed Mr Milosevic took rifampicin to get “a one-way ticket to Moscow” for treatment.

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From Wired:

This, as it turns out, is a new revolution in games: the anti-HUD movement. Recently, several new games have renounced the HUD. In Doom 3, the ammo count for your chain gun is displayed not in a floating bar, but on the headstock of the gun. Peter Jackson’s King Kong doesn’t offer a scrap of onscreen artificial data: Adrien Brody’s voice calls out the ammo count each time you reload, and low health is denoted by shaky, blurry vision.

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From Wired:

“All of us who run the TPB are against the copyright laws and want them to change,” said “Brokep,” a Pirate Bay operator. “We see it as our duty to spread culture and media. Technology is just a means to doing that.”

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